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Monday, 20 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Give Your Ubuntu Desktop a Flat Look Using Arc Theme arindam1989 18/08/2018 - 2:06pm
Story Opera 55 Released with Dark Theme Support, New Layout Page and many more improvements arindam1989 18/08/2018 - 2:02pm
Story Linux Apps Land On Beta Channel For A Lot Of Chromebooks Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2018 - 11:36am
Story Games: Planetary Annihilation, La-Mulana 2, SteamOS Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2018 - 11:23am
Story Software: Castero, Skrooge, gtk-vnc Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2018 - 11:12am
Story Oracle Yields GraphPipe Roy Schestowitz 1 18/08/2018 - 11:08am
Story Graphics: Intel and AMD Developments Roy Schestowitz 18/08/2018 - 9:40am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2018 - 12:22am
Story Zephyr Project Embraces RISC-V with New Members and Expanded Board Support Rianne Schestowitz 18/08/2018 - 12:07am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/08/2018 - 11:28pm

A Quick Look At The Windows Server vs. Linux Performance On The Threadripper 2990WX

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

One of the frequent requests/comments stemming from the launch-day Windows 10 vs. Linux benchmarks on the new AMD Threadripper 2990WX were questions about whether this 32-core / 64-thread processor would do better with Windows Server given Microsoft's obvious tuning of that Windows flavor to high core/thread counts... Well, here are some initial figures with Windows Server 2016 and a Windows Server 2019 preview.

Given the immense interest and speculation about the Windows Server performance on the AMD Threadripper 2990WX, to see if it would give Linux better competition relative to Windows 10, I ran some initial benchmarks so far. I am still doing some more Windows vs. Linux exploration and benchmarking (a lot of other interesting tests from this new hardware) while for today are the Windows Server 2016/2019 results alongside the other operating system tests on this 2990WX system.

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Major Zorin OS Linux Release Is Coming This Fall Based on Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Shipping with the updated HWE (Hardware Enablement) stack from the recently announced Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release, which is powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), as well as an updated X graphics stack, Zorin OS 12.4 brings all the latest software and security updates from the Ubuntu repositories, along with performance enhancements and bug fixes.

"Zorin OS 12.4 introduces an updated hardware enablement stack. The newly-included Linux kernel 4.15, as well as an updated X server graphics stack," reads the release announcement. "In addition, new patches for system vulnerabilities are included in this release, so you can have the peace of mind knowing that you’re using the most secure version of Zorin OS ever."

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Linux Kernel 4.18 Gets First Point Release, It's Now Ready for Mass Deployments

Filed under
Linux

Linux kernel 4.18 was released on Sunday, August 12, 2018, by Linus Torvalds, and it's currently the most advanced kernel series available for Linux-based operating systems. The first point release, Linux 4.18.1, is now available, which marks the Linux 4.18 kernel series as stable and ready for mass deployments.

All Linux OS vendors are now urged to adopt the latest Linux 4.18 kernel series for their operating systems on supported architectures as it brings various new features, improvements, and updated drivers for better hardware support. Linux kernel 4.18.1 is now available for download from kernel.org or our software portal.

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Stable kernels 4.18.1, 4.17.15, 4.14.63, 4.9.120 and 4.4.148

Filed under
Linux

CentOS Linux 7.5 Operating System Is Now Available for IBM POWER9 Architecture

Filed under
Red Hat

Released back in May 2018, CentOS Linux 7.5 is based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system and supported 32-bit (i386), 64-bit (x86_64), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (PPC64el), PowerPC 64-bit (PPC64), and ARMhf architectures. However, the initial release only supported IBM POWER8 processors, but it's now available for IBM POWER9 processors too.

"I am pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7 (1804) for POWER9 processors (ppc64le - powerpc 64-bit little endian). This release is derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 ALT," said James O'Connor. "Note this release is 99% equivalent to the existing CentOS 7 Linux 7 (1804) for POWER8 processors (ppc64le - powerpc 64-bit little endian)."

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Ubuntu, Debian, RHEL, and CentOS Linux Now Patched Against "Foreshadow" Attacks

Filed under
Red Hat
Security
Debian
Ubuntu

Both Canonical and Red Hat emailed us with regards to the L1 Terminal Fault security vulnerability, which are documented as CVE-2018-3620 for operating systems and System Management Mode (SMM), CVE-2018-3646 for impacts to virtualization, as well as CVE-2018-3615 for Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX). They affect all Linux-based operating system and machines with Intel CPUs.

"It was discovered that memory present in the L1 data cache of an Intel CPU core may be exposed to a malicious process that is executing on the CPU core. This vulnerability is also known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF). A local attacker in a guest virtual machine could use this to expose sensitive information (memory from other guests or the host OS)," reads the Ubuntu security advisory.

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Hands-on with Linux Mint Debian Edition 3 Beta

Filed under
Debian
HowTos

I have been out of touch for the past six months, because I accepted a teaching position in Amsterdam. The amount of time that required, and the weekly commute from Switzerland (yes, really, weekly), was vastly more than I expected, and left me no time to do justice to my blog. But now I am back again, and determined to manage my time more effectively and keep up with blogging.

Although I haven't been writing, I certainly have been keeping up with news and developments in the Linux world. What really inspired me to get busy and write again was the announcement of LMDE 3 (Cindy) Beta. Hooray! How long have we been waiting for this? It feels like years. Oh, that's because it has been years.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Theo on the latest Intel issues

    Theo de Raadt (deraadt@) posted to the tech@ mailing list with some background on how the latest discovered Intel CPU issues relate to OpenBSD.

    [...]

    These 3 issues (CVE-2018-3615, CVE-2018-3620, CVE-2018-3646) together
    are the currently public artifacts of this one bug.

  • Putting Stickers On Your Laptop Is Probably a Bad Security Idea

    Mitchell said political stickers, for instance, can land you in secondary search or result in being detained while crossing a border. In one case, Mitchell said a hacker friend ended up missing a flight over stickers.

  • Video Shows Hotel Security at DEF CON Joking About Posting Photos of Guests' Belongings to Snapchat

    But the room check captured on video suggests the walkthroughs are subject to abuse by hotel personnel who may use them as opportunity to snoop on guests or take and post images for amusement. And accounts of other searches that involved hotel security staff refusing to show ID or showing insufficient ID, and displaying bullying and threatening behavior to guests in occupied rooms, raises questions about the legality of the searches and the tactics and training of security personnel.

  • Researchers in Finland detect vulnerability in password management software

    Researchers identified a security gap in more than 10 applications used by millions around the world, including an app used by Finland's population registry.

  • Trump ends Obama-era rules on US-led cyberattacks: report

     

    The memorandum required that an extensive interagency process take place before the U.S. government embarks on any cyberattacks. Trump reversed the rules to try and ease some of those restrictions, which critics argued were detrimental to launching the attacks quickly, according to the Journal.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Debian Turns 25! Here are Some Interesting Facts About Debian Linux

Filed under
Linux

One of the oldest Linux distribution still in development, Debian has just turned 25. Let’s have a look at some interesting facts about this awesome FOSS project.
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Linux Foundation Zephyr Project Attracts IoT Developers and Tech Giants

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation has always been committed to welcoming companies and organizations of all sizes as part of its heritage and ongoing vision for opening technology for all to experiment with and to build things.

The Zephyr Project, an open source project to build a real-time operating system (RTOS) for the Internet of Things (IoT), announced last week they grew their community of contributors with support for more than 100 developer boards and the addition of six new members.

These industry and academic leaders include Antmicro, DeviceTone, SiFive, the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, The Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS) and Northeastern University.

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GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • How to install Linux apps on your Chromebook

    Chromebooks are great because they're simple: there's a lot you can get done with web services without exposing yourself to the troubles and security issues that plague more complex platforms.

    But if you need to do a bit more with your Chromebook, you have a few options. Most Chromebooks these days allow you to install apps from the Google Play Store, which should fill most productivity gaps. If not, you'll soon have one more option: installing Linux apps. To be clear, you've been able to install Linux apps on Chromebooks for years because Chrome OS is Linux. But, it's about to get much easier.

  • Top 5 Features Still Missing From Chrome OS

    Google’s Chrome OS gets a lot of things right, and the platform has evolved considerably over the years. Not only does it offer an always up-to-date version of the Chrome browser, but there are also Android apps, stylus input, and even Linux support on some devices. However, Chrome OS is far from perfect. You have to make compromises if you choose to live with a Chromebook, but you shouldn’t have to make quite this many. Here are the top five things Google should fix.

  • Walmart's selling an all-aluminum Chromebook with a comfy keyboard for just $220

    If you’re not considering a Chromebook when you're shopping for a notebook, you’re doing it wrong. Google's low-cost laptops are typically light, fast, secure, and have almost everything you need for remote work a.k.a. the Internet. Today, you can get in on the action for a great price. Walmart is selling the Acer Chromebook 14 (CB3-431-C6ZB) for $220. That’s about $30 to $40 cheaper than you’d usually pay for this laptop.

Microsoft Versus Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

OSCON 2018 Events Coverage by LWN

Filed under
OSS
  • Using AI on patents

    Software patents account for more than half of all utility patents granted in the US over the past few years. Clearly, many companies see these patents as a way to fortune and growth, even while software patents are hated by many people working in the free and open-source movements. The field of patenting has now joined the onward march of artificial intelligence. This was the topic of a talk at OSCON 2018 by Van Lindberg, an intellectual-property lawyer, board member and general counsel for the Python Software Foundation, and author of the book Intellectual Property and Open Source. The disruption presented by deep learning ranges from modest enhancements that have already been exploited—making searches for prior art easier—to harbingers of automatic patent generation in the future.

  • Diverse technical topics from OSCON 2018

    The O'Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON) returned to Portland, Oregon in July for its 20th meeting. Previously, we covered some retrospectives and community-management talks that were a big part of the conference. Of course, OSCON is also a technology conference, and there were lots of talks on various open-source software platforms and tools.

    An attendee who was coming back to OSCON after a decade would have been somewhat surprised by the themes of the general technical sessions, though. Early OSCONs had a program full of Perl, Python, and PHP developer talks, including the famous "State of The Onion" (Perl) keynote. Instead, this year's conference mostly limited the language-specific programming content to the tutorials. Most of the technical sessions in the main program were about platforms, administration, or other topics of general interest, some of which we will explore below.

LWN on Linux Kernel: Scheduler, Speck, and WireGuard

Filed under
Linux
  • Scheduler utilization clamping

    Once upon a time, the only way to control how the kernel's CPU scheduler treated any given process was to adjust that process's priority. Priorities are no longer enough to fully control CPU scheduling, though, especially when power-management concerns are taken into account. The utilization clamping patch set from Patrick Bellasi is the latest in a series of attempts to allow user space to tell the scheduler more about any specific process's needs.

    Contemporary CPU schedulers have a number of decisions to make at any given time. They must, of course, pick the process that will be allowed to execute in each CPU on the system, distributing processes across those CPUs to keep the system as a whole in an optimal state of busyness. Increasingly, the scheduler is also involved in power management — ensuring that the CPUs do not burn more energy than they have to. Filling that role requires placing each process on a CPU that is appropriate for that process's needs; modern systems often have more than one type of CPU available. The scheduler must also pick an appropriate operating power point — frequency and voltage — for each CPU to enable it to run the workload in a timely manner while minimizing energy consumption.

  • Reconsidering Speck

    The Speck cipher is geared toward good performance in software, which makes it attractive for smaller, often embedded, systems with underpowered CPUs that lack hardware crypto acceleration. But it also comes from the US National Security Agency (NSA), which worries lots of people outside the US—and, in truth, a fair number of US citizens as well. The NSA has earned a reputation for promulgating various types of cryptographic algorithms with dubious properties. While the technical arguments against Speck, which is a fairly simple and straightforward algorithm with little room for backdoors, have not been all that compelling, the political arguments are potent—to the point where it is being dropped by the main proponent for including it in the kernel.

  • WireGuarding the mainline

    The WireGuard VPN tunnel has been under development — and attracting attention — for a few years now; LWN ran a review of it in March. While WireGuard can be found in a number of distribution repositories, it is not yet shipped with the mainline kernel because its author, Jason Donenfeld, hasn't gotten around to proposing it for upstreaming. That changed on on July 31, when Donenfeld posted WireGuard for review. Getting WireGuard itself into the mainline would probably not be all that hard; merging some of the support code it depends on could be another story, though.

    WireGuard implements a simple tunneling protocol allowing network traffic to be routed through a virtual private network provider. It has been developed with an eye toward smallness, ease of verification, and performance, rather than large numbers of features. It is, according to the patch posting, "used by some massive companies pushing enormous amounts of traffic". Some effort has gone into making WireGuard widely available, an effort that has helped to create a significant user community. But the ultimate way to make this kind of software widely available is to get it into everybody's kernel; that requires upstreaming.

Software: Selenium, Password Managers, MAAS

Filed under
Software
  • Testing web applications with Selenium

    Whenever one is engaged in large-scale changes to a software project, it is nice to have some assurance that regressions are not being introduced in the process. Test suites can be helpful in that regard. But while the testing of low-level components can be relatively straightforward, testing at the user-interface level can be harder. Web applications, which must also interact with web browsers, can be especially challenging in this regard. While working on just this sort of project, your editor finally got around to looking at Selenium WebDriver as a potential source of help for the testing problem.

    The overall goal of the Selenium project is automating the task of dealing with web browsers (from the user side). The WebDriver component, in particular, provides an API allowing a program to control a browser and observe how the browser reacts. There are many potential applications for this kind of functionality; it could be used to automate any of a number of tiresome, web-oriented tasks that resist the use of simpler tools, for example. But perhaps the most obvious use case is regression-testing of web applications.

    The Selenium code is distributed under version 2.0 of the Apache license; it is available on GitHub. The WebDriver component offers API bindings for a number of languages, including Java, JavaScript, C#, Perl, PHP, Python (2 and 3), and Ruby. Your editor, naturally, was interested in the Python bindings. Fedora 28 packages the relatively old 3.7.0 release from December 2017, which is discouraging, but the current 3.14.0 release can be had from PyPI. One must also obtain a "driver" for one or more specific browsers; your editor has been using geckodriver to test with Firefox.

  • Best Free Linux Password Managers

    A password manager is a utility which helps users store and retrieve passwords and other data. Most password managers use a local database to hold the encrypted password data.

    In modern society, people face a bamboozling amount of information to retain. Most people read a considerable amount of information online on a regular basis. Whether you conduct business online, read for your job, or just read for pleasure, the internet is a vast source of information. Retaining that information on a long-term basis can be difficult. However, some nuggets of information need to be recalled quickly. Passwords are one such example.

    As a computer user, you’ll no doubt have numerous passwords to remember. Sites have arbitrary rules for various services. For example, a site may insist on a minimum number of characters, capital letters, numerals, and special characters which make choosing the same password for each site to be impossible. More importantly, there are good security reasons not to duplicate passwords. Password reuse and simple, easy-to-guess passwords are difficult issues. If you’re using the same password on more than one site, you risk having several accounts stolen if any one of them is breached.

  • MAAS 2.4.1 released!

    MAAS 2.4.1 has now been released and it is a bug fix release. Please see more details in discourse.maas.io [1].

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

A Fresh Look At The NVIDIA vs. Radeon Linux Performance & Perf-Per-Watt For August 2018

With NVIDIA expected to announce the Turing-based GeForce RTX 2080 series today as part of their Gamescom press conference, here is a fresh look at the current NVIDIA Linux OpenGL/Vulkan performance with several Pascal graphics cards compared to AMD Polaris and Vega offerings. Additionally, with these latest Linux drivers, the current look at the performance-per-Watt. It will be interesting to learn more about the GeForce RTX 2080 series in a short time, which will surely deliver significantly better performance and power efficiency improvements over the GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" hardware. But for a current look at how those cards are running under Linux, this morning are benchmarks for the GeForce GTX 1060, GTX 1070 Ti, GTX 1080, and GTX 1080 Ti while using the latest NVIDIA 396.51 graphics driver. For the competition on the AMD side was the Radeon RX Vega 64 and RX 580 (the GTX 1060 / RX 580 included in this article for a more mature look at the Linux driver support, namely for the AMDGPU+RADV/RadeonSI side). The Radeon tests were done with the latest Linux 4.18 AMDGPU DRM state and using Mesa 18.3-dev from the Oibaf PPA as of 19 August. Read more

Latest Deepin Linux Release Promises to Consume Less Memory Than Ubuntu, Windows

Coming just two months after the Deepin 15.6 release that introduced new Light and Dark themes, Deepin 15.7 is now available with a focus on performance. It smaller ISO size by removing unnecessary components and optimizing the core system structure, better power optimization for laptops for up to 20 percent battery life, and improved memory usage. "Deepin 15.7 has made a series of adjustments and optimizations in memory usage. In the standard configuration, the boot memory has decreased from 1.1G to 830M, and reduced to less than 800M on a discrete graphics card," wrote the devs in today's announcement, where they compared the memory consumptions of Deepin 15.7, Deepin 15.6 and other operating systems on the same computer. Read more

Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Daily Lives Now Ship with Yaru Theme by Default

We've been waiting for this moment for a couple of weeks now and we're proud to be the first to report that the Yaru theme developed by various members of the Ubuntu Linux community has now finally been enabled by default in the daily builds of the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system. Of course, we immediately took a screenshot tour of the Yaru theme on today's Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) daily build so we can show you how great it looks. We think it's a professional theme that matures Ubuntu to the next level, and it is definitely a step in the right direction for the look and feel of the Ubuntu Desktop. Read more