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Wednesday, 13 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
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Elisa 0.0.80 Released

Filed under
KDE

Elisa is a music player designed to be simple and nice to use.

Elisa allows to browse music by album, artist or all tracks. The music is indexed using either a private indexer or an indexer using Baloo. The private one can be configured to scan music on chosen paths. The Baloo one is much faster because Baloo is providing all needed data from its own database. You can build and play your own playlist.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Publisher of Linux Journal says November was its last issue

    The magazine has also completed its 2017 archive which it would normally sell but will now be sent to subscribers for free.

    “It has been a great run, folks,” concluded Fairchild. “A big hats-off to everyone who contributed to our birth, our success and our persistence over these many years. We’d run the credits now, but the list would be too long, and the risk of leaving worthy people out would be too high. You know who you are. Our thanks again.”

  • ARB_get_program_binary Implementation Lands In Core Mesa, Intel Driver

    The past few weeks Intel developers working on their Mesa open-source graphics driver have been working on the ARB_get_program_binary OpenGL extension so it actually works for applications wanting to use this extension to retrieve a compiled shader/program by the driver.

    ARB_get_program_binary makes it possible to easily get a binary representation of an OpenGL program object. That binary can then be supplied later on back to the OpenGL driver for execution, if the application wants to function as an offline compiler or handle its own caching to avoid recompilation of GLSL source shaders on future runs, etc. ARB_get_program_binary is required by OpenGL 4.1 and Mesa's support for it up until now was just saying it didn't support any formats for the binary programs.

  • 24 Must Have Essential Linux Applications In 2017

    What are the must have applications for Linux? The answer is subjective and it depends on for what purpose do you use your desktop Linux. But there are still some essentials Linux apps that are more likely to be used by most Linux user. We have listed such best Linux applications that you should have installed in every Linux distribution you use.

  • Ubuntu-Based Peppermint OS 8 Respin Brings Back Advert Blocker, Adds New Theme

    The developers of the Ubuntu-based Peppermint OS distribution have released today the first respin of the Peppermint OS 8 series.

    Launched earlier this year on May 28, Peppermint OS 8 is based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and brought major new features. Now, the Peppermint 8 Respin is here with a bunch of improvements and the latest software releases, including the Nemo 3.4.7 file manager, OpenVPN 2.4.4 VPN implementation, and Linux kernel 4.10.0-40.

  • Rebuilt packages for Plasma5 (ktown)

    The updates in Slackware-current this week (icu4c, poppler, libical) broke many programs in my Plasma5 ‘ktown’ repository, to the extent that the complete Plasma 5 desktop would no longer start.

    That is the fun of using the bleeding edge – if something disruptive happens in slackware-current you’ll have to wait for the 3rd party repositories to catch up. And I am one of those 3rd party packagers.

  • LattePanda Delta and Alpha boards with Intel chips, Windows and Linux support hit Kickstarter

    The little boards look like a cross between a Raspberry Pi and an Arduino (which makes sense, since it’s an Arduino-compatible device with Leonardo coprocessor and 80 GPIO connectors). But the LattePanda Alpha are Windows and Linux compatible PCs with Intel processors and significantly more RAM than you get with most tiny computers in this category.

  • Gear Fit2 Pro exclusively available for pre-order on Flipkart India

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu: Mir and Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
Ubuntu

Compiler/Development News

Filed under
Development
GNU
BSD
  • LLVM 5.0.1 Expected For Release Next Week

    While the LLVM 5.0.1 bug-fix release was originally expected last month, after going through three release candidates the stable version is now expected to arrive next week.

    Tom Stellard of Red Hat announced on Thursday that 5.0.1-rc3 has been tagged. He expects this to be the final release candidate and to then officially declare v5.0.1 next week.

  • DTrace & ZFS Being Updated On NetBSD, Moving Away From Old OpenSolaris Code

    The NetBSD operating system has been working on updating their DTrace and ZFS implementations.

    Chuck Silvers with the NetBSD project has been working on updating their DTrace and ZFS code. Up to now NetBSD has been relying upon outdated ZFS/DTrace code that originated from the OpenSolaris code-base. As many of you know, OpenSolaris hasn't been a thing now for many years since Oracle acquired Sun Microsystems.

  • Intel Continues Tuning Glibc's Performance: More FMA'ing

    Intel continues contributing performance optimizations to the GNU C Library (glibc) for allowing various functions to make use of modern processor instruction set extensions.

    Glibc this year has seen FMA optimizations, its per-thread cache enabled, AVX optimizations, and other performance work contributed in large part by Intel engineers. Glibc isn't gaining weight this holiday season but is continuing to be optimized for speed.

WordPress 4.9.1

Filed under
OSS
Security
Debian
  • WordPress hit with keylogger, 5,400 sites infected
  • WORDPRESS 4.9.1

    After a much longer than expected break due to moving and the resulting lack of Internet, plus WordPress releasing a package with a non-free file, the Debian package for WordPress 4.9.1 has been uploaded!

    WordPress 4.9 has a number of improvements, especially around the customiser components so that looked pretty slick. The editor for the customiser now has a series of linters what will warn if you write something bad, which is a very good thing! Unfortunately the Javascript linter is jshint which uses a non-free license which that team is attempting to fix.  I have also reported the problem to WordPress upstream to have a look at.

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Ionic, one of Madison's top startups, prepares to launch its first commercial product

    They decided early on to open up their code to other developers, in the spirit of the open-source model. Lynch said they looked to other startups, like the document-storage tool MongoDB, as models for creating open-source software as a startup. The idea was that by making it free and open, Ionic Framework would be able to grow its user base more quickly. Lynch added that most other companies making developer toolkits at the time were offering commercial products, so it made sense to offer something free.

  • Practical Ways to Improve Your Open Source Development Impact

    Open source programs are sparking innovation at organizations of all types, and if your program is up and running, you may have arrived at the point where maximizing the impact of your development is essential to continued success. Many open source program managers are now required to demonstrate the ROI of their technology development, and example open source report cards from Facebook and Google track development milestones.

  • Intel Supports open source software for HPC

    OpenHPC is a collaborative, community effort that initiated from a desire to aggregate a number of common ingredients required to deploy and manage High Performance Computing Linux clusters including provisioning tools, resource management, I/O clients, development tools, and a variety of scientific libraries. Packages provided by OpenHPC have been pre-built with HPC integration in mind with a goal to provide re-usable building blocks for the HPC community. Over time, the community also plans to identify and develop abstraction interfaces between key components to further enhance modularity and interchangeability. The community includes representation from a variety of sources including software vendors, equipment manufacturers, research institutions, supercomputing sites, and others. This community works to integrate a multitude of components that are commonly used in HPC systems, and are freely available for open source distribution. We are grateful for the efforts undertaken by the developers and maintainers of these upstream communities that provide key components used in HPC around the world today, and for which this OpenHPC community works to integrate and validate as a cohesive software stack.

  • Overcoming challenges when building great global communities

    Today's open source communities include people from all around the world. What challenges can you expect when establishing an online community, and how can you help overcome them?

    People contributing to an open source community share a commitment to the software they’re helping to develop. In the past, people communicated by meeting in person at a set place and time, or through letters or phone calls. Today, technology has fostered growth of online communities—people can simply pop into a chat room or messaging channel and start working together. You might work with someone in Morocco in the morning, for example, and with someone in Hawaii that evening.

  • Google's DeepVariant Deep-Learning Technology Goes Open-Source
  • Mozilla Awards Research Grants to Fund Top Research Projects

    We are happy to announce the results of the Mozilla Research Grant program for the second half of 2017. This was a competitive process, with over 70 applicants. After three rounds of judging, we selected a total of fourteen proposals, ranging from building tools to support open web platform projects like Rust and WebAssembly to designing digital assistants for low- and middle- income families and exploring decentralized web projects in the Orkney Islands. All these projects support Mozilla’s mission to make the Internet safer, more empowering, and more accessible.

  • Quest: crossing the DevOps database chasm

    In order to embrace open source, DBAs need the tools at hand to ensure they do not become overwhelmed.

  • Facebook, Google, Red Hat, IBM revisit open source licencing

    Four of the largest players in the open source arena – Facebook, Google, Red Hat and IBM – have joined forces to promote predictability in open source licensing, by committing to extend additional rights to rectify open source licence compliance errors.

    Michael Cunningham, Red Hat's executive vice president and general counsel, said this was in line with the four organisations' belief in promoting greater fairness and predictability in licence enforcement and the growth of participation in the open source community.

    According to Cunningham, Red Hat believes that enforcement of open source software licences should be judged by whether the activity fosters or discourages adoption of the software and collaboration and participation in open source development.

  • Open-source design can democratise healthcare, says Sabine Wildevuur

    "Normally, you make something, you close it down, and you sell it. Open design, on the other hand, is all about sharing your knowledge of design with others," she says.

  • Mozilla's new voice recognition model, fixing the GPL, and more news

    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we look at Mozilla's new speech recognition model, how big players in open source are moving to help the GPL, and more.

  •  

  • Open Source Biolab Uses 3D Bioprinting Platform to Fabricate Complex Earlobe Vasculature

    3D printing technology has made a big impact in the medical field, in more ways than one, including bioprinting and biofabrication. The Institute for Development of Advanced Applied Systems, or Institute IRNAS, located in Slovenia, operates Symbiolab, an open source-based biolab that focuses on the development of future-proof 3D biofabrication. The lab works on innovative biomaterials research, and also develops biomedical research applications and hardware solutions, including its Vitaprint 3D bioprinting platform. The open source Vitaprint was developed in-house at Symbiolab, and the platform includes demo files, protocols, and hardware.

  • Open source suicide: This 3D-printable ‘death pod’ provides painless euthanasia

    Dr. Philip Nitschke is concerned about a different aspect, though. He is one of the most outspoken proponents of euthanasia, referring to deliberate intervention taken by a person to end his or her life to relieve suffering. And as the founder and director of the pro-euthanasia group Exit International, he is using tech to help his cause. Working alongside Netherlands engineer Alexander Bannick, Nitschke developed a 3D-printed euthanasia machine called Sarco which, he claims, could serve a valuable social purpose.

    [...]

    There will no doubt be plenty of controversy about the creation of Sarco, just as there is around the wider topic of euthanasia. But it’s definitely an example of open-source 3D-printing models we’ve not considered before.

  • New Antitrust Division Chief Prioritizes Regulation of Standard Setting Organizations

    As we discussed in our May 2017 article, the current head of the DOJ’s Antitrust Division, Makan Delrahim, brings considerable intellectual property experience to the division. Delrahim started his legal career at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative as deputy director for intellectual property rights. He later served on the Intellectual Property Task Force while serving a stint at the DOJ in the early 2000s. Then-acting Antitrust Division Chief R. Hewitt Pate referred to Delrahim as a “patent lawyer.” Therefore, it is not surprising that, in a Nov. 10 maiden speech at the University of California’s Transactional Law and Business Conference, Delrahim chose to discuss antitrust violations in IP licensing, specifically urging federal and state antitrust enforcement agencies to prioritize review of standard setting organizations (SSOs).

Microsoft EEE and Holes

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Best Gnome distro of 2017

Filed under
GNOME

And the winner is …

Well, I’ve never ever believed I’d say this, but being objective and all, it’s an Arch-based distribution that gets the highest accolade in this test – Antergos 17.9! Do mind, it’s not perfect, but it does offer a reasonably rounded experience with some really interesting (and unique) features. Like most small projects, it does suffer from obvious lack of manpower needed to tackle the usability papercuts, but on the other hand, it brings in innovation that is not apparent in other distributions, and it also provides a solid baseline for day-to-day use, without compromising on stability, and without ever disclosing its geeky DNA.

My experience with Antergos 17.9 shows a distribution that is relatively sprightly, focuses on usability, offers excellent driver support, and tries to balance beauty with functionality. It still struggles gluing all these together, but there do not seem to be any fundamental flaws. It also manages to showcase Gnome in a very positive light, which cannot be said of pretty much any other candidate that I’ve had a chance to test this year. If anything, the outcome of 2017 is satisfying in its own right, even though I did struggle and suffer a lot while playing and testing these different distributions. But in one sentence, if you do need a Gnome distro, this is the best that I can offer and recommend. And it wouldn’t be a bad recommendation either. All right, that was two sentences.

Conclusion

Back in December 2016, I said Gnome is slowly recovering. Scratch that. It was a brief flicker of hope, and it’s gone. It would seem the direction has reversed, and the Gnome desktop is becoming less usable. Its overall design remains stubbornly unchanged while the quality and stability are constantly deteriorating.

Still, an odd distro or two manage to rise above the mediocrity and provide a relatively reasonable desktop session, Gnome notwithstanding. For 2017, Antergos is Dedoimedo’s Gnome choice. You get an okay mix of everything, solid performance, a stable behavior, and a few glitches just to keep you on your toes. Most impressive is the graphics stack support, very elegant looks, and tons of great software. If you’ve never considered Arch in its many guises and sacrificial forms, then Antergos seems like a good starting point.

But wait, what if I don’t like Gnome, you asketh? Despair not! In the coming days, we will also look at what Xfce and Plasma have to offer. It shall be most interesting. Stay tuned.

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Also: OSK update

PR: Bergmannos – New Linux-Based Os for Mining

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Bergmann Team has developed a new Linux-based OS for mining BergmannOS, that enables full control over the rigs and automatization of the cryptocurrency mining. Since December 11, 2017 during the entire period of ICO BergmannOS the participants will have access to a shippable beta version of the software complex for miners.

Already in the beta version of BergmannOS miners will be able to estimate the benefits of the main functions of the system. Users are guaranteed 24/7 real time control of the devices, auto and manual tuning of the units, autotuning of video cards (after first update), warning messages in the event of failures, reports on unites’ work, marketing quotation of crypto currencies and news from crypto world. User-friendly interface makes the usage of the system easier.

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Free Software Foundation Fun For Xmas

Filed under
GNU

If you're looking for festive presents for programmers, the Free Software Foundation has some options that combine open software street cred with supporting open source and the GNU philosophy.

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is a not for profit organization founded in the mid 80s to support the free software movement. Its founder was Richard Stallman, who also launched the GNU Project in the 80s to create an operating system like UNIX but entirely free. The FSF initially used its funds to pay developers to write free software for the GNU project, and once that was achieved, funds have been used to support the free software movement legally and structurally.

Most of the choices in the FSF shop do come down to items with the word GNU on them - I was hoping for some furry GNU hats or slippers, but sadly (or perhaps fortunately) this wasn't a choice.

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Debian 9.3 and Debian 8.10 released

Filed under
Debian
  • Updated Debian 9: 9.3 released

    The Debian project is pleased to announce the third update of its stable distribution Debian 9 (codename "stretch"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

    Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "stretch" media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

  • Updated Debian 8: 8.10 released

    The Debian project is pleased to announce the tenth update of its oldstable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

    Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "jessie" media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 "Stretch" and 8.10 "Jessie" Have Been Officially Announced

    The Debian Project announced this morning the general availability of the Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 and Debian GNU/Linux 8.10 point releases of the Stretch and Jessie series.

    While Debian GNU/Linux 9.3 is the third maintenance update to the Stretch series, the latest stable release of the operating system, Debian GNU/Linux 8.10 represents the tenth point release of the Jessie branch, which is the oldstable distribution of Debian since the release of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch." Both include the latest security updates published through the official repositories.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and Kubernetes Articles

Filed under
Server
  • Deletion and Garbage Collection of Kubernetes Objects

    With the Kubernetes container orchestration engine, concepts and objects build on top of each other. An example we described previously is how deployments build on top of replica sets to ensure availability, and replica sets build on top of Pods to get scheduling for free.

    What exactly happens when we delete a deployment? We would not only expect the deployment itself to be deleted, but also the replica sets and pods that are managed by the deployment.

  • Kubernetes Preview: 'Apps Workloads' Enabled by Default, Windows Capabilities Move Forward

    Kubernetes 1.9 will feature a ready-for-prime-time Apps Workloads, Windows functionality moving into beta and forward moves in storage.

  • Salesforce is latest big tech vendor to join the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Salesforce announced today that it was joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the open-source organization that manages Kubernetes, the popular open-source container orchestration tool.

    It is the latest in a long line of big name companies, joining the likes of AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal, all of whom joined in a flurry of activity earlier this year. Most of these other companies have more of a cloud infrastructure angle. Salesforce is a SaaS vendor, but it too is seeing what so many others are seeing: containerization provides a way to more tightly control the development process. Kubernetes and cloud native computing in general are a big part of that, and Salesforce wants a piece of the action.

  • How the Cloud Native Computing Foundation Is Advancing Cloud Projects

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) kicked off its Kubecon CloudNativeCon North America conference on Dec. 6 with a host of announcements about its' expanding open-source cloud efforts. The CNCF is home to the Kubernetes container orchestration system as well as 13 additional cloud project that enable organizations to build cloud native architectures.

    Among the announcements at the event, which has over 4,000 attendees, are new members as well as multiple project updates, including 1.0 releases from the containerd, Jaeger, CoreDNS and Fluentd projects.

Why the Zephyr Project Uses Vendor HALs

Filed under
Linux

The use of vendor-supplied HALs (Hardware Abstraction Layers) in open source projects has been a source of ongoing discussion. At the October ELC Europe conference in Prague, we took up the topic again.

In “Using SoC Vendor HALs in the Zephyr Project,” Zephyr Project contributor Maureen Helm, an MCU Software Architect at NXP, discussed the pros and cons of using vendor HALs. Ultimately, she argued that that the benefits far outweigh the tradeoffs. This viewpoint was expanded upon in a recent Zephyr Project blog post by Helm and Frank Ohlhorst.

The main reason for using vendor-supplied HALs is to reduce coding and testing time. The Zephyr Project maintains and develops the lightweight Zephyr OS for microcontroller units (MCUs), the number and variety of which have soared in recent years.

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Security: FUD, Let’s Encrypt, Updates, and 'Nature'

Filed under
Security
  • The Hidden Costs of Open Source Security Software [Ed: Using the Microsoft-connected Black Duck to badmouth FOSS again]
  • Let’s Encrypt Looking Forward to 2018

    Let’s Encrypt had a great year in 2017. We more than doubled the number of active (unexpired) certificates we service to 46 million, we just about tripled the number of unique domains we service to 61 million, and we did it all while maintaining a stellar security and compliance track record. Most importantly though, the Web went from 46% encrypted page loads to 67% according to statistics from Mozilla - a gain of 21 percentage points in a single year - incredible. We’re proud to have contributed to that, and we’d like to thank all of the other people and organizations who also worked hard to create a more secure and privacy-respecting Web.

  • Security updates for Friday
  • 'Nature' Editorial Juxtaposes FOIA Email Release With Illegal Hacking [sic]

    The release of these emails by a person who has a clear point-of-view on the issue, however, has led to yet another discussion of the proper way of publishing raw documents. Nature, one of the more respected and widely read science publishers, mentions the release of these emails in the same breath as emails that were obtained by illegal hacking [sic] in an editorial published this week:

Devices: Raspberry Pi Alternatives and New Boards

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

FreeBSD and OpenBSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

Bodhi Linux 4.4 Released with Linux Kernel 4.13, Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Bodhi Linux 4.4 comes three months after the Bodhi Linux 4.3 release to add all the latest software updates and security patches from the repositories of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system. It's an incremental update that doesn't require you to reinstall your system.

"This is a normal update release and it comes three months after the release of Bodhi 4.3.1. Existing Bodhi 4.x.y users do not need to reinstall as the primary goal of this update release is to simply keep the current ISO image up to date," writes Jeff Hoogland in today's announcement.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distro to Get a New Look with Debonaire Desktop Theme

Q4OS is a small GNU/Linux distribution based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE). It's explicitly designed to make the Microsoft Windows to Linux transition accessible and more straightforward as possible for anyone. Dubbed Debonaire, the new desktop theme uses dark-ish elements for the window titlebar and panel. Somehow it resembles the look and feels of the acclaimed Arc GTK+ theme, and it makes the Q4OS operating system more modern than the standard look offered by the Trinity Desktop Environment. Read more

today's leftovers

Software: GIMP, VLC, Cryptsetup, Caprine, KWin and NetworkManager

  • GIMP 2.9.8 Open-Source Image Editor Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing
    GIMP 2.9.8, a development version towards the major GIMP 2.10 release, was announced by developer Alexandre Prokoudine for all supported platforms, including Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released
    Newly released GIMP 2.9.8 introduces on-canvas gradient editing and various enhancements while focusing on bugfixing and stability. For a complete list of changes please see NEWS.
  • It Looks Like VLC 3.0 Will Finally Be Released Soon
    VLC 3.0 is something we've been looking forward to for years and it's looking like that big multimedia player update could be released very soon. Thanks to Phoronix reader Fran for pointing out that VLC 3.0 release candidates have begun to not much attention. VLC 3.0 RC1 was tagged at the end of November and then on Tuesday marked VLC 3.0 RC2 being tagged, but without any official release announcements.
  • cryptsetup 2.0.0
  • Cryptsetup 2.0 Released With LUKS2 Format Support
    A new major release is available of Cryptsetup, the user-space utility for dealing with the DMCrypt kernel module for setting up encrypted disk volumes. Cryptsetup 2.0.0 is notable in that it introduces support for the new on-disk LUKS2 format but still retaining support for LUKS(1). The LUKS2 format is security hardened to a greater extent, more extensible than LUKS, supports in-place upgrading from LUKS, and other changes.
  • Caprine – An Unofficial Elegant Facebook Messenger Desktop App
    There is no doubt Facebook is one of the most popular and dynamic social network platform in the modern Internet era. It has revolutionized technology, social networking, and the future of how we live and interact. With Facebook, We can connect, communicate with one another, instantly share our memories, photos, files and even money to anyone, anywhere in the world. Even though Facebook has its own official messenger, some tech enthusiasts and developers are developing alternative and feature-rich apps to communicate with your buddies. The one we are going to discuss today is Caprine. It is a free, elegant, open source, and unofficial Facebook messenger desktop app built with Electron framework.
  • KWin On Wayland Without X11 Support Can Startup So Fast It Causes Problems
    It turns out that if firing up KDE's KWin Wayland compositor without XWayland support, it can start up so fast that it causes problems. Without XWayland for providing legacy X11 support to KDE Wayland clients, the KWin compositor fires up so fast that it can cause a crash in their Wayland integration as KWin's internal connection isn't even established... Yep, Wayland compositors are much leaner and cleaner than the aging X Server code-base that dates back 30+ years, granted most of the XWayland code is much newer than that.
  • NetworkManager Picks Up Support For Intel's IWD WiFi Daemon & Meson Build System
    NetworkManager now has support for Intel's lean "IWD" WiFi daemon. IWD is a lightweight daemon for managing WiFi devices via a D-Bus interface and has been in development since 2013 (but was only made public in 2016) and just depends upon GCC / Glibc / ELL (Embedded Linux Library).

Linux Foundation: Servers, Kubernetes and OpenContrail

  • Many cloud-native hands try to make light work of Kubernetes
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation, home of the Kubernetes open-source community, grew wildly this year. It welcomed membership from industry giants like Amazon Web Services Inc. and broke attendance records at last week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon conference in Austin, Texas. This is all happy news for Kubernetes — the favored platform for orchestrating containers (a virtualized method for running distributed applications). The technology needs all the untangling, simplifying fingers it can get. This is also why most in the community are happy to tamp down their competitive instincts to chip away at common difficulties. “You kind of have to,” said Michelle Noorali (pictured), senior software engineer at Microsoft and co-chair of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America & Europe 2017. “These problems are really hard.”
  • Leveraging NFV and SDN for network slicing
    Network slicing is poised to play a pivotal role in the enablement of 5G. The technology allows operators to run multiple virtual networks on top of a single, physical infrastructure. With 5G commercialization set for 2020, many are wondering to what extend network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) can help move network slicing forward.
  • Juniper moves OpenContrail's SDN codebase to Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks has announced its intent to move the codebase for OpenContrail, an open-source network virtualisation platform for the cloud, to the Linux Foundation. OpenContrail provides both software-defined networking (SDN) and security features and has been deployed by various organisations, including cloud providers, telecom operators and enterprises to simplify operational complexities and automate workload management across diverse cloud environments.
  • Juniper moves OpenContrail’s codebase to Linux Foundation, advances cloud approach
    Juniper Networks plans to move the codebase for its OpenContrail open-source network virtualization platform for the cloud to the Linux Foundation, broadening its efforts to drive more software innovations into the broader IT and service provider community. The vendor is hardly a novice in developing open source platforms. In 2013, Juniper released its Contrail products as open sourced and built a user and developer community around the project. To drive its next growth phase, Juniper expanded the project’s governance, creating an even more open, community-led effort.
  • 3 Essential Questions to Ask at Your Next Tech Interview
    The annual Open Source Jobs Report from Dice and The Linux Foundation reveals a lot about prospects for open source professionals and hiring activity in the year ahead. In this year’s report, 86 percent of tech professionals said that knowing open source has advanced their careers. Yet what happens with all that experience when it comes time for advancing within their own organization or applying for a new roles elsewhere?