Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Only in America? Copyright Law Key to Global Free Software Mode

Filed under
OSS

The existence of legal systems without robust enforcement of copyright law, in countries where software development is a highly robust enterprise, is a serious threat to the free software model.

Using Gmail as GNOME’s default mailer (v1.1)

Filed under
HowTos

I started using Gmail as my primary mail application a little over a year ago. For the most part, it has been a pleasurable experience. However, to my knowledge there has not been a simple way to make Gmail your default mailer in GNOME. My latest shell script changes all this.

How To Save Traffic With Apache2's mod_deflate

Filed under
HowTos

In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure mod_deflate on an Apache2 web server. mod_deflate allows Apache2 to compress files and deliver them to clients (e.g. browsers) that can handle compressed content which most modern browsers do.

PBS Special: Living Online - Good or Bad

Filed under
Web

Back in late March, I detailed some of the ways that computers and the Internet had changed my life. I use Google News to check breaking news. I use online services such as Evite to organize face-to-face activities. I communicate with more people through email than by phone or in person. I buy gifts online.

Puppy Linux founder comments on the OLPC project

Filed under
OLPC

Puppy Linux still wants to be the Linux operating system that powers the laptop computers in the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project, distro originator Barry Kauler says in an article published May 13 on the Puppy OS website.

Book review: User Mode Linux by Jeff Dike

Filed under
Reviews

Freesoftware Magazine chimes in with their take on User Mode Linux by Jeff Dike. This following the review from All About Linux carried this weekend.

Gentoo 2006.0: Elbow grease required

Filed under
Gentoo
Reviews

I've been toying with Gentoo 2006.0 off and on since it was released in February. Gentoo is a solid distribution, but it takes a little more work than most users might expect to get the distribution up and running.

The pragmatic desktop Linux user

Filed under
Linux

Sometimes, you can't get what you want. That's the point Robin "Roblimo" Miller makes in his pained confession at NewsForge, that when it comes to the video production that makes up 10 percent of his work time, it's best done using Camtasia, a proprietary Windows-only program. Argh!

But, what can you do?

New Tuxlab looks to community for sustainability

Filed under
Ubuntu

A new model for sustainably implementing computer laboratories in underprivileged schools is being piloted by Tuxlabs, a division of the Shuttleworth Foundation. Tuxlabs has partnered with a Sowetan entrepreneur, who will sell services in a school's open source laboratory to the community once the school day ends.

KDE and Business: AEI Interview

Filed under
KDE

Continuing in a series of interviews with businesses that benefit KDE and benefit from KDE, we investigate AEI (Analytical Engineering, Inc), a Midwestern engineering firm founded in 1994. In an interview originally conducted by Aaron Seigo, AEI's design engineer and author Caleb Tennis discusses AEI's IT needs and KDE's involvement.

Goodwill launches open-source intranet

Filed under
OSS

Wanting to give its large and far-flung community of users better online access to shared knowledge and to one another, Goodwill Industries International has overhauled its extranet portal. By using an open-source system Goodwill was able to develop its entire new extranet for less than one-fourth the cost.

Fujitsu Veteran to Lead Open Source Development Labs Japan

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a global consortium dedicated to accelerating the adoption of Linux and open source software, has announced it has appointed Takashi Kunai as its new director of Japan.

Open Source Group Pushes Corporate Social Networking

Filed under
OSS

The new program may be more germane to IT professionals at small and mid-size businesses, suggested Adam Braunstein, an analyst at Robert Frances Group. Most large companies are already involved in some open source projects, so the ground-level questions have been answered.

n/a
n/a
n/a

CLI Magic: A better CD encoder

Filed under
HowTos

A better CD encoder (abcde) is a console-based utility that grabs tracks off audio CDs and converts them to MP3, Ogg Vorbis, and other formats using backend programs such as cdparanoia and cdda2wav for grabbing tracks, and oggenc and lame for encoding them.

Nmap: A valuable open source tool for network security

Filed under
Software

Arguing for an increase in your IT security budget is often an arduous task, so many administrators turn to free open source tools to help get the job done. But how can they rely on tools with no commercial support and that never get past the beta version? Well, if you think like that, you need to think again.

Find open files with lsof

Filed under
HowTos

For a heavy-duty investigative or forensics tool, look no further than lsof. It comes bundled with pretty much every Linux distribution, and it's an indispensable program. The name of the tool stands for "list open files," and that's exactly what it does, with an amazing amount of detail.

Linux Tips: take control of your bash_history

Filed under
HowTos

I use bash (as my preferred shell) most of the day. And bash history is a very important feature of bash that saves me much time by recalling previous commands I have typed. Here are some tricks on how you can optimize with some simple configurations settings the usage your bash history.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Security: SSL, Microsoft Windows TCO, Security Breach Detection and SIM Hijackers

  • Why Does Google Chrome Say Websites Are “Not Secure”?
    Starting with Chrome 68, Google Chrome labels all non-HTTPS websites as “Not Secure.” Nothing else has changed—HTTP websites are just as secure as they’ve always been—but Google is giving the entire web a shove towards secure, encrypted connections.
  • Biggest Voting Machine Maker Admits -- Ooops -- That It Installed Remote Access Software After First Denying It [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO]
    We've been covering the mess that is electronic voting machines for nearly two decades on Techdirt, and the one thing that still flummoxes me is how are they so bad at this after all these years? And I don't mean "bad at security" -- though, that's part of it -- but I really mean "bad at understanding how insecure their machines really are." For a while everyone focused on Diebold, but Election Systems and Software (ES&S) has long been a bigger player in the space, and had just as many issues. It just got less attention. There was even a brief period of time where ES&S bought what remained of Diebold's flailing e-voting business before having to sell off the assets to deal with an antitrust lawsuit by the DOJ. What's incredible, though, is that every credible computer security person has said that it is literally impossible to build a secure fully electronic voting system -- and if you must have one at all, it must have a printed paper audit trail and not be accessible from the internet. Now, as Kim Zetter at Motherboard has reported, ES&S -- under questioning from Senator Ron Wyden -- has now admitted that it installed remote access software on its voting machines, something the company had vehemently denied to the same reporter just a few months ago.
  • Bringing cybersecurity to the DNC [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO. Microsoft Exchange was used.]
    When Raffi Krikorian joined the Democratic National Committee (DNC) as chief technology officer, the party was still reeling from its devastating loss in 2016 — and the stunning cyberattacks that resulted in high-level officials’ emails being embarrassingly leaked online.
  • Getting Started with Successful Security Breach Detection
    Organizations historically believed that security software and tools were effective at protecting them from hackers. Today, this is no longer the case, as modern businesses are now connected in a digital global supply ecosystem with a web of connections to customers and suppliers. Often, organizations are attacked as part of a larger attack on one of their customers or suppliers. They represent low hanging fruit for hackers, as many organizations have not invested in operationalizing security breach detection. As this new reality takes hold in the marketplace, many will be tempted to invest in new technology tools to plug the perceived security hole and move on with their current activities. However, this approach is doomed to fail. Security is not a "set it and forget it" type of thing. Defending an organization from a breach requires a careful balance of tools and operational practices -- operational practices being the more important element.
  • The SIM Hijackers

    By hijacking Rachel’s phone number, the hackers were able to seize not only Rachel’s Instagram, but her Amazon, Ebay, Paypal, Netflix, and Hulu accounts too. None of the security measures Rachel took to secure some of those accounts, including two-factor authentication, mattered once the hackers took control of her phone number.

GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Windows Spying

  • Changes [Pop!_OS]

    For the last 12 years, my main development machine has been a Mac. As of last week, it’s a Dell XPS 13 running Pop!_OS 18.04.

    [...]

    Take note: this is the first operating system I’ve used that is simpler, more elegant, and does certain things better than macOS.

  • System76 Opens Manufacturing Facility to Build Linux Laptops
    As it turns out, System76 is making the transition from a Linux-based computer seller, into a complete Linux-based computer manufacturer. The Twitter photos are from their new manufacturing facility. This means that System76 will no longer be slapping their logo on other company’s laptops and shipping them out, but making their own in-house laptops for consumers.
  • Extension adding Windows Timeline support to third-party browsers should have raised more privacy questions
    Windows Timeline is a unified activity history explorer that received a prominent placement next to the Start menu button in Windows 10 earlier this year. You can see all your activities including your web browser history and app activity across all your Windows devices in one place; and pickup and resume activities you were doing on other devices. This is a useful and cool feature, but it’s also a privacy nightmare. You may have read about a cool new browser extension that adds your web browsing history from third-party web browsers — including Firefox, Google Chrome, Vivaldi, and others — to Windows Timeline. The extension attracted some media attention from outlets like MSPoweruser, Neowin, The Verge, and Windows Central.

Public money, public code? FSFE spearheads open-source initiative

Last September, the non-profit Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) launched a new campaign that calls for EU-wide legislation that requires publicly financed software developed for the public sector to be made publicly available under a free and open-source software license. According to the ‘Public Money, Public Code’ open letter, free and open-source software in the public sector would enable anyone to “use, study, share, and improve applications used on a daily basis”. The initiative, says the non-profit, would provide safeguards against public sector organizations being locked into services from specific companies that use “restrictive licenses” to hinder competition. The FSFE also says the open-source model would help improve security in the public sector, as it would allow backdoors and other vulnerabilities to fixed quickly, without depending on one single service provider. Since its launch, the Public Money, Public Code initiative has gained the support of 150 organizations, including WordPress Foundation, Wikimedia Foundation, and Tor, along with nearly 18,000 individuals. With the initiative now approaching its first anniversary, The Daily Swig caught up with FSFE spokesperson Paul Brown, who discussed the campaign’s progress. Read more