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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 17 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 15 (Olivia) falko 09/06/2013 - 11:33am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 08/06/2013 - 2:41pm
Poll Ubuntu srlinuxx 08/06/2013 - 1:21pm
Story The Wayland Situation: Facts About X vs. Wayland srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:02pm
Story The trouble with UEFI Boot, and a helping hand from a BIOS firmware update srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:01pm
Story Why we need an Anti-Virus in Linux? srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:00pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.10 (Part 1) srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 9:17pm
Story Ubuntu holds its own srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:42pm
Story Fedora Day Two: Customisation srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:39pm
Story Young maker says Raspberry Pi is way to go srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:38pm

Turbocharged awk

Filed under
HowTos

In a previous article, I covered the basics of awk and presented a small application to reformat address book data. Now, I'll show you how to turbocharge awk. You can improve the performance of your awk programs by uncovering bottlenecks in your code with the help of a profiler, hunting for bugs with XREF, and using Awka to increase speed.

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Filed under
HowTos

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc.. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.

Wildcard hosting with Apache and Bind

Filed under
HowTos

If you have control over your DNS you can setup 'wildcard hosting', which means you can have a webserver accept connections for any given subdomain. This can be enormously useful for community websites, or other hosting purposes.

IBM vs. SCO: Now it's IBM's turn

Filed under
Legal

For months, years, it's all been about what SCO could discover about IBM, Linux, and Unix. The shoe's on the other foot now, as the US District Court in Utah has revealed that IBM has launched discovery motions against Microsoft, Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard, and BayStar Capital.

Ubuntu eyes gadgets

Filed under
Ubuntu

Three developers have launched a project to bring Ubuntu, a popular Debian-based desktop Linux distribution, to embedded Linux devices.

Open Source Clone of Windows Not a Ripoff?

Filed under
OS

In January of this year, allegations were levied against ReactOS that some code may well have been inappropriately taken from Windows NT and found its way into the open source clone. In response the ReactOS development team stopped development and downloads and began a detailed audit of their code base.

Sun shines on patch automation firm

Filed under
Linux

Sun has agreed to acquire Aduva, a small company whose products automate the installation of software patches on large numbers of Solaris or Linux computers.

Toying with a different beast: Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

I decided to investigate Linux myself, and attempt to install it on my old laptop computer. This article describes the process I’ve been through and the results, which have been interesting to say the least.

Fedora Core 5 Benchmarks

Filed under
Reviews

Since the inception of the Fedora Core Project, thanks in part to Red Hat, Fedora has been largely leading the way for other distributions to be based upon it as well as setting the bar for future Linux distributions. Just how prepared is Fedora Core 5 for hitting prime time? We shall see today as we evaluate some of its possibilities.

Pixel Image Editor Gives Graphics Goodness

Filed under
Reviews

Pixel is a multi-award-winning, multi-platform image editor aimed at the Adobe Photoshop market. Its features include layers, a wide range of effects, exporting to Web photo galleries, color management, animation, Web image maps, and more.

Linux Consultant Survey Results Are In

Filed under
Linux

Several months ago, I had the idea to contact as many Linux consultants as possible to find out how they are using Linux for their clients. Drawing on my own experiences, I came up with a list of 12 pointed but open-ended questions that would collect opinions about and uses of Linux from people who work with it on a daily basis.

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New DHCP For Linux?

Filed under
Linux

A new DHCP client for Linux is set to take advantage of an expected new feature in a future Linux kernel by automatically recognizing when a Linux user has disconnected from a particular DHCP server and look for a new connection.

Widespread Linux Practice May Violate License

Filed under
Linux

A common practice among embedded Linux developers almost certainly violates the Linux license, according to research conducted by software attorneys Jay Michaelson and Christopher Holst.

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Quake 4 1.1 Beta Update

Filed under
Gaming

id software released a beta update for Quake 4 which fixes issues and adds gameplay elements throughout both single and multiplayer - including a forecemodel option, a one-minute warning for tournament matches,Quake4 Linux fixed pure server autodownloading, Hyper-Threading Technology support, smooth stairjumping and a ton of multiplayer specific fixes.

How to get reports on OpenOffice 2.0 Base, part one

Filed under
HowTos

With databases, it's important not just to put things in correctly, but to get them out correctly. You can slam data into your database all day long, but if you can't eventually print it out for your employees, your accountant, or that nice man from the IRS, you're not playing with a full database.

Linux 101: Simplify your life with Linux package managers

Filed under
HowTos

Package managers, which are included in many Linux distributions, can simplify the overall decision making process and save you time and frustration.

Among Linux music players, Banshee really wails

Filed under
Reviews

Over the last few years, the number of Linux music players has mushroomed, providing a variety of applications to suit different people. I've tried several Linux music players since I started using the operating system, but none of them were perfect for my requirements. I recently tried out an increasingly popular music player, Banshee, and have found a new personal favourite.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.