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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Dapper Drake LTS Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux is starting to become more popular in the world today. I am seeing more and more people choose Linux for their servers than Windows. True the price tag of zero might be an influence but Linux offers a different feel to the world of operating systems. On June 1 Ubuntu released the newest version of its Linux distro named Dapper Drake LTS (long term support). For Linux novices like me it is very nice to either run the live CD for a little bit or partition off and install.

Linux 101: Establish more effective security capabilities with OpenSSH

Filed under
HowTos

Longtime Linux administrators know that SSH, the "Secure Shell" protocol, is one of the most handy and potentially critical utilities in their software toolbox. This document explains how OpenSSH, an open source implementation of SSH, works and how it can play an important role in your Linux environment.

Top Ten Reasons to use Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Top Ten Reasons to use Ubuntu: Now that I am officially “switched”, I will outline the reasons why Ubuntu rises to the top of other Linux variants available.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: SUSE Linux Enterprise Arrives

Filed under
Linux

If anyone was surprised about the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server or Desktop (SLES or SLED) 10 this week, we would like them to contact us and let us know where they were on vacation because it sounds like seclusion we could use.

Secure messenger to guard against totalitarian governments

Filed under
Software

Aged geeks should remember the Cult of the Dead Cow (CDC) well. The hacker group was particularly famous for its easy-to-use Back Orifice spyware trojan has released an open source client that secures your instant messenger communications over the Internet.

New UFO: Alien Invasion Release 2.0-rc4

Filed under
Gaming

UFO: AI is a turn based overhead tactical combat sim with research trees. Your mission is to fight back against the alien horde attempting to invade Earth. UFO: Alien Invasion is out with a new release in their 2.0 cycle.

Linux free, easy & secure

Filed under
Linux

The operating system would be free and open, and based around Unix – the commercial operating system used all over the world by companies, governments and universities. The project received overwhelming support, and nobody could have known then that, in just a few years, it would become one of the most powerful operating systems in existence.

Microsoft Promises

Filed under
Microsoft

Every nursing home posts a Patients Rights list. In our world, Microsoft has recently announced "Twelve Tenets to Promote Competition". It is designed to serve the same purpose as posting patient rights in nursing homes.

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JBoss Denies Novell Claim of License Change

Filed under
SUSE

Red Hat Inc's JBoss division has denied that it has made any licensing changes that would have prompted Novell Inc to drop its Java application server from its SUSE Linux Enterprise distribution.

Web Browser Smackdown: IE7 vs. Firefox 2 vs. Opera 9

Filed under
Software

Right at this moment, big changes have or are about to occur in three well-known browsers: Internet Explorer is finally being updated, with version 7 in its third beta and almost ready to roll out the door; Firefox is also ripening an upgrade beta for its Version 2.0—it's in beta 1; and finally Opera, which has a devoted but smaller following, has recently come out with Version 9.0. So, three new browsers in the same year, after no action for a half decade. How do they stack up?

Dual-booting Windows and Linux the easy way

Filed under
HowTos

The Gnome Partition Editor Live CD is a simple tool that will shrink a (usually "the") Windows partition on your hard drive, then make Linux partitions almost automatically. These four videos step you through the process of downloading GPartEd (the program's nickname) from SourceForge.net, defragmenting Windows, shrinking your Windows partition, and installing the three most commonly-used Linux partitions. As a free bonus, a fifth video will show you how to uninstall Linux and stretch your shrunk-down Windows partitition until it once again takes up your whole hard drive.

SCO Claims IBM Destroyed Crucial Evidence

Filed under
Misc

The SCO Group versus IBM lawsuit is growing ever more desperate--and ever more weird. The latest twist: Buried in a new filing from SCO is a claim that International Business Machines destroyed evidence.

Galician Government Representative Meets KDE Translators

Filed under
KDE

Last Saturday, a representative from the Galician Government in Spain met members of the Trasno project. This project includes Free Software volunteer translators for the Galician language, from a wide range of Free software projects including KDE.

Free and Open Source Software at the United Nations

Filed under
OSS

A digital divide exists between communities in their access to computers, the Internet, and other technologies. This article looks at how various United Nations agencies use free and open source software to meet the goal of putting technology at the service of people around the world.

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Security: The adventure continues — SELinux

Filed under
HowTos

An advantage of upgrading to the latest Fedora Core version (5) is the latest and greatest in SELinux advances. I mentioned in a previous article that a plethora of Linux kernel improvements were available, and SELinux was one of them.

Please Submit your Open Source Resume in Word

Filed under
Misc

I had email today from Studio B. Apparently they are looking for technical writers in some specific areas. I'm neither interested nor qualified (and if elected, I will not serve) but I had to raise my eyebrows at this kicker: If this is of interest, please submit your resume, in Microsoft Word format...

A Gentoo diary part 1

Filed under
Gentoo

It's been a while since I promised to write about my Gentoo desktops. In the intro, I gave some general information about Gentoo, and explained my setup. This time I set up an old 300 mHz server with Gentoo, tried to make distributed compiling work, learned a bit more about Windowmaker, tried to get a Broadcom Wireless card working on a laptop, switched to Grub, and finally got rid of Xmms.

Shuttleworth computer labs ransacked

Filed under
Misc

Two of the computer laboratories set up in Cape Town schools by the Shuttleworth Foundation were ransacked during the three-week school holiday which ended on Friday.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: More Xbash Scare (Relies on Already-Compromised Systems), CCTV Weakness, and Red Hat's 'DevSecOps' Buzzwording

  • Windows, Linux Servers Beware: New Malware Encrypts Files Even After Ransom Is Paid
    Ransomware skyrocketed from obscurity to infamy in no time flat. Headline-grabbing campaigns like WannaCry, Petya and NotPetya preceded a substantial increase in the number of small attacks using similar techniques to extort unwary internet users. Now, researchers at Palo Alto Networks have revealed new malware that carries on NotPetya's legacy while combining various types of threats into a single package. The researchers, dubbed Unit 42, named this new malware Xbash. It's said to combines a bot net, ransomware and cryptocurrency mining software in a single worm and targets servers running Linux or Windows. The researchers blame an entity called the Iron Group for Xbash's creation, which has been linked to other ransomware attacks. The malware is thought to have first seen use in May 2018.
  • Xbash Malware Deletes Databases on Linux, Mines for Coins on Windows
  • CCTV Cameras Are Susceptible To Hacks; Hackers Can Modify Video Footage
    A vulnerability has been discovered in video surveillance camera software that could allow hackers to view, delete or modify video footage. A research paper published by Tenable, a security firm, has revealed a vulnerability named Peekaboo in the video surveillance systems of NUUO. By exploiting the software flaw, hackers can acquire the admin privileges and can monitor, tamper and disable the footage.
  • Tenable Research Discovers “Peekaboo” Zero-Day Vulnerability in Global Video Surveillance Software
    Tenable®, Inc., the Cyber Exposure company, today announced that its research team has discovered a zero-day vulnerability which would allow cybercriminals to view and tamper with video surveillance recordings via a remote code execution vulnerability in NUUO software — one of the leading global video surveillance solution providers. The vulnerability, dubbed Peekaboo by Tenable Research, would allow cybercriminals to remotely view video surveillance feeds and tamper with recordings using administrator privileges. For example, they could replace the live feed with a static image of the surveilled area, allowing criminals to enter the premises undetected by the cameras.
  • 5 ways DevSecOps changes security
    There’s been an ongoing kerfuffle over whether we need to expand DevOps to explicitly bring in security. After all, the thinking goes, DevOps has always been something of a shorthand for a broad set of new practices, using new tools (often open source) and built on more collaborative cultures. Why not DevBizOps for better aligning with business needs? Or DevChatOps to emphasize better and faster communications? However, as John Willis wrote earlier this year on his coming around to the DevSecOps terminology, “Hopefully, someday we will have a world where we no longer have to use the word DevSecOps and security will be an inherent part of all service delivery discussions. Until that day, and at this point, my general conclusion is that it’s just three new characters. More importantly, the name really differentiates the problem statement in a world where we as an industry are not doing a great job on information security.”

What is the relationship between FSF and FSFE?

Ever since I started blogging about my role in FSFE as Fellowship representative, I've been receiving communications and queries from various people, both in public and in private, about the relationship between FSF and FSFE. I've written this post to try and document my own experiences of the issue, maybe some people will find this helpful. These comments have also been shared on the LibrePlanet mailing list for discussion (subscribe here) Being the elected Fellowship representative means I am both a member of FSFE e.V. and also possess a mandate to look out for the interests of the community of volunteers and donors (they are not members of FSFE e.V). In both capacities, I feel uncomfortable about the current situation due to the confusion it creates in the community and the risk that volunteers or donors may be confused. The FSF has a well known name associated with a distinctive philosophy. Whether people agree with that philosophy or not, they usually know what FSF believes in. That is the power of a brand. When people see the name FSFE, they often believe it is a subsidiary or group working within the FSF. The way that brands work, people associate the philosophy with the name, just as somebody buying a Ferrari in Berlin expects it to do the same things that a Ferrari does in Boston. To give an example, when I refer to "our president" in any conversation, people not knowledgeable about the politics believe I am referring to RMS. More specifically, if I say to somebody "would you like me to see if our president can speak at your event?", some people think it is a reference to RMS. In fact, FSFE was set up as a completely independent organization with distinct membership and management and therefore a different president. When I try to explain this to people, they sometimes lose interest and the conversation can go cold very quickly. Read more

Android Leftovers

Things Gateway - Rules Rule

A smart home is a lot more than just lights, switches and thermostats that you can control remotely from your phone. To truly make a Smart Home, the devices must be reactive and work together. This is generally done with a Rule System: a set of maxims that automate actions based on conditions. It is automation that makes a home smart. There are a couple options for a rule system with the Things Gateway from Mozilla. First, there is a rule system built into the Web GUI, accessed via the Rules option in the drop down menu. Second, there is the Web Things API that allows programs external to the Things Gateway to automate the devices that make up a smart home. Most people will gravitate to the former built-in system, as it is the most accessible to those without predilection to writing software. This blog post is going to focus on the this rules system native to the Things Gateway. Read more