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Monday, 10 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How to install Iceweasel : Ubuntu (6.06.1 / 6.10)

Filed under
HowTos

I have put together a few quick steps to installing Iceweasel for anyone that would like to try the new browser, or would prefer it over the trademarked Firefox.

Convert MythTV Shows to iPod Video and DVDs

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HowTos

If you record TV shows using your MythTV DVR, you may want to play them on an iPod, a PSP, or even through a Windows Media Center system. Another desire might be to burn your recordings onto a DVD.

Sirjavabean's ASCII Art generator

Filed under
Misc

Generates ASCII Art (both the "pure", or black and white, and colour, or colour, varieties) from any JPEG, GIF or PNG you care to send it.

ASCII Art generator

openSUSE 10.2 RC 1 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

We're in the homestretch now. The only planned release candidate of openSUSE 10.2 was released a few days ago and final is expected to be released to the public on December 7. From this point on only showstopper and security bugfixes get integrated, so we are able to get a real good idea of 10.2 from this rc. I must say, from what I've seen, this is going to be a great release.

Save time use MySQL auto completion for database or table names

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HowTos

There is a quick way to type both MySQL database and table names quickly by enabling MySQL auto completion feature. This is called automatic rehashing.

Retrieve bug reports from the Debian Bug Tracking System using apt-listbugs

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HowTos

apt-listbugs is a tool which retrieves bug reports from the Debian Bug Tracking System and lists them. Especially, it is intended to be invoked before each upgrade by apt in order to check whether the upgrade/installation is safe.

Thank you, openSUSE (from a FreeBSD guy)

Filed under
Linux

In my previous blog entry I wrote about the joys of upgrading hardware and having it Just Work (tm) in the Free Software operating system of your choice. Of course, I have not explored all the possibilities yet.

Cleanup Maildir folders (archive/delete old mails)

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HowTos

Maildir saves each mail in a separate file, it is much easier than it used to be to manipulate the mails. Everyone can write some simple script to do some cleanup based on its needs. A while ago I have stumbled across this python script that does most of the things I needed to cleanup maildir folders.

Look Out Windows, Here Comes Xandros Desktop Pro V4

Filed under
Linux

When XANDROS Desktop was released as the “Platform for Your Digital Life” I felt that they had finally brought the Linux Desktop to the mainstream. Now, I find that they have made it even easier for Novice and experienced Linux users with their all new, just released XANDROS DESKTOP PROFESSIONAL VER 4.

Gnome-Theme-Manager to Support Color Scheme Customization

Filed under
Software

One thing lacking in Gnome is the ability to change the color scheme of your chosen theme. More precisely, gnome-theme-manager doesn’t currently allow you to customize your colors. You can change your icons, window borders, and controls, but you can’t change the color scheme. The color scheme is set within the chosen Theme itself and currently cannot be easily changed/edited by a user. This is about to change.

Playing with partitions 2

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HowTos

Previously on Playing with partitions I discussed how I fdisked an SD Ram card now as promised here is how I repartitioned a running server with an active oracle database.

UWC Head of Computer Science declares: “we will completely rid ourselves of Novell”

Filed under
SUSE

As the custodian of IT at UWC, I will be pursuing a full
investigation into a total exit strategy for all Novell products from
the University of the Western Cape.

Create backup of all packages using APTonCD in Ubuntu

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HowTos

APTonCD is a tool with a graphical interface which allows you to create one or more CDs or DVDs (you choose the type of media) with all of the packages you’ve downloaded via APT-GET or APTITUDE, creating a removable repository that you can use on other computers.

Might Red Hat Be Forced Into a Deal with Microsoft Similar to Novell's?

Filed under
Linux

Moglen is concerned that worried customers - and ergo falling revenues - could force Red Hat into a deal with Microsoft similar to Novell's and Ballmer keeps baiting the hook by saying he's "willing to do the same deal with Red Hat and other Linux distributors," giving Red Hat's base the ammo it needs.

Pepper Pad offers Linux-based Web tablet for sofa surfing

Filed under
Linux

It seems like a great idea: making a computer that's somewhere between the size of a cell phone and a laptop, for people to carry around and surf the Web. The Pepper Pad 3 is a new entry in this difficult field. It's a big slab-style tablet, almost 6 by 12 inches wide and an inch thick, with a small keyboard and a 7-inch touch screen.

Mark Shuttleworth issues divisive invitation to openSUSE developers

Filed under
Linux

Tensions are already high over Novell's patent agreement with Microsoft, but Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth's invitation to openSUSE developers "concerned about the long term consequences" has kicked the tension up a notch.

Kick-Start your Java Apps, Part 2

The combination of Eclipse, DB2 Express-C, and WebSphere Application Server Community Edition -- all free to download, use, and deploy -- is an excellent from-prototype-to-production suite for all of your Java and Java enterprise development needs. This tutorial shows you how to move an application from a conventional design to one based on Ajax technology -- all within the friendly and familiar environment of the Kick-start your Java apps suite.

What's the Difference Between that 2004 Sun-MS Agreement and Novell's?

Filed under
SUSE

I've seen a number of folks assert that what Novell has done in the patent peace agreement with Microsoft is no different than what Sun did in its agreement with Microsoft in 2004, so I thought it would be worthwhile to post the Sun agreement again, so you can see the difference. As you will see, as unfortunate as the Sun deal was, it had limited effect on GNU/Linux developers or end users.

Ubuntu impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

After a long time I decided to change the linux distribution. I did so after the problems with the apt-get and update of the debian linux distribution (sid). I downloaded the iso image of ububntu linux version 6.10, burned the image and installed.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Best VPNs for GNU/Linux, and Google+ Chaos Again

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Best VPNs for Linux
  • After a Second Data Leak, Google+ Will Shut Down in April Instead of August
    Back in October, a security hole in Google+’s APIs lead Google to announce it was shutting down the service. Now, a second data leak has surfaced, causing the company to move the shutdown up by four months. This new data leak is quite similar to the first one: profile information such as name, email address, age, and occupation was exposed to developers, even for private profiles. It’s estimated that upwards of 52 million users were affected by this leak. The good news is that while the first hole was open for three years, this one was only an issue for six days, from November 7th to the 13th, 2018.

Linux and Linux Foundation Leftovers

  • Initial i.MX8 SoC Support & Development Board Possibly Ready For Linux 4.21
    While the i.MX8 series was announced almost two years ago and the open-source developers working on the enablement for these new NXP SoCs hoped for initial support in Linux 4.17, the Linux 4.21 kernel that will be released in the early months of 2019 is slated to possibly have the first i.MX8 support in the form of the i.MX8MQ and also supporting its development/evaluation board.
  • AeonWave: An Open-Source Audio Engine Akin To Microsoft's XAudio2 / Apple CoreAudio
    An open-source audio initiative that's been in development for years but flying under our radar until its lead developer chimed in is AeonWave, which supports Windows and Linux systems while being inspired by Microsoft XAudio and Apple's CoreAudio.
  • Take Linux Foundation Certification Exams from Anywhere
    2018 has seen a new wave of popularity for the open source community and it has sparked more interest in potential engineers, system administrators, and Linux experts. 2019 is around the corner and now is a good time to look up Linux certification examinations that will enable you to progress in your career. The good news we have for you is that the Linux Foundation has made certification examinations available online so that IT enthusiasts can get certificates in a wide range of open source domains.

Games Leftovers

  • The Linux version of Civilization VI has been updated with cross-platform multiplayer support
    Just in time for the holidays, Linux gamers finally have version parity with other platforms. Expect to be able to spend just one more turn playing with friends on other operating systems.
  • John Romero has announced a free unofficial spiritual successor to The Ultimate DOOM's 4th episode
    John Romero, one of the co-founders of id Software has revealed he's been working on SIGIL, a free megawad for the original 1993 DOOM. [...] These boxes, will contain music from Buckethead, along with a custom song written expressly for SIGIL. A tempting purchase for any big DOOM fan, I especially love the sound of a 16GB 3-1/2-inch floppy disk-themed USB. You have until December 24, 2018 to order one and I imagine stock will go quite quickly.
  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Sees Its First Alpha Release In Nearly Three Years
    Unvanquished had been easily one of the most promising open-source games several years back with decent in-game visuals/art, a continually improving "Daemon" engine that was a distant mod of ioquake3 while leveraging ETXReaL components and more, and all-around a well-organized, advancing open-source game project. Their monthly alpha releases stopped almost three years ago while today that's changed just ahead of Christmas. The Unvanquished developers announced Unvanquished Alpha 51 today as their first release in two years and eight months after having made fifty monthly alpha releases. While this is the fifty-first alpha, the developers say they should soon be ready for the beta drop.
  • Unvanquished, the free and open source shooter has a huge new release now out
    After being quiet for some time, the Unvanquished team is back and they have quite a lot to show off in the new release of their free and open source shooter. This is their first new release since April 2016, so the amount that's changed is quite striking! Hopefully, this will be the start of regular release once again, since they used to do monthly releases a few years ago and it was fun to watch it grow.
  • Valve adds even more gamepad support to their latest client beta
    Valve are continuing to support as many devices as possible with a new Steam client beta now available. Since there's no gamepad to rule them all, it makes sense for Valve to support as many as they can. Even though I love the Steam Controller, I do understand that it's not going to be a good fit for everyone. Now, Steam will support the PowerA wired/wireless GameCube Style controllers, PowerA Enhanced Wireless Controller and the PDP Faceoff Wired Pro Controller to boost their already rather large list of supported devices.
  • The turn-based tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is coming along nicely
    After a few months in Early Access, the tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark has come along nicely and it's quite impressive. It became available on Steam back in August, this was with same-day Linux support as promised from developer 6 Eyes Studio after their successful Kickstarter.
  • Citra, the Nintendo 3DS emulator now has 'Accurate Audio Emulation'
    Citra, the impressive and quickly moving Nintendo 3DS emulator has a new progress report out and it sounds great. They've made some great progress on accurate audio emulation, with their new "LLE (Accurate)" option. They say this has enabled games like Pokémon X / Y, Fire Emblem Fates and Echoes and more to work. There's a downside though, that currently the performance does take quite a hit with it so they're still recommending the "HLE (Fast)" setting for now. They go into quite a lot of detail about how they got here, with plenty of bumps along the way. Most of the work towards this, was done by a single developer who suffered a bit of a burn-out over it.
  • Mindustry, an open source sandbox Tower Defense game that's a little like Factorio
    Available under the GPL, the developer originally made it for the GDL Metal Monstrosity Jam which happened back in 2017 and it ended up winning! Seems the developer didn't stop development after this, as they're currently going through a new major release with regular alpha builds.
  • Have graphical distortions in Unity games with NVIDIA? Here's a workaround
    It seems a lot of Unity games upgrading to later versions of Unity are suffering from graphical distortions on Linux with an NVIDIA GPU. There is a workaround available.

Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 Released With Just Over 800 Patches On Top Of Wine

Released on Friday was Wine 4.0-RC1 while coming out over the weekend was the Wine-Staging re-base that is carrying still over 800 patches on top of the upstream Wine code-base. Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 is available with 805 patches over what's found in the "vanilla" Wine code-base. But prior to the Wine 4.0 RC1 milestone there were a fair number of patches that were promoted upstream including ntoskrnl, WindowsCodecs, user32, and DXGI changes. Read more