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Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Red Hat News

  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift
    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite
    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects
    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start. This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.
  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

Android Leftovers

Sourcefire's Roesch pledges long, open-source life for Snort

Filed under
Software

There's a lot of skepticism from the Snort users right now because they're in wait-and-see mode, so we need to prove to them that we mean it when we say Snort's going to get a lot better. We're not going to try to close it or anything like that. Once they see how much benefiting, they're going to be really happy.

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Desktop Linux: If we build it, will they come?

Filed under
Linux

Linux has made major inroads on servers and in data centres running both open-source and proprietary applications on millions of computers worldwide. We've recently seen the rise of Linux on mobile devices. But the Linux desktop remains elusive. We know it's out there, but it only now seems to be approaching the tipping point.

Mandriva Integrating Music Service

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva is integrating The Kompany's Mindawn into their Mandriva 2006 distribution. Mindawn is an online music purchasing service mainly stocked by self publish and small indie labels that offers downloads in the Ogg and Flac audio formats.

TW My sysadmin toolbox

Filed under
OSS

I'm only an amateur systems administrator, but I'm also terribly lazy, so I do have a few good tools in my toolbox.

I work for Mandriva. However, all these tools except Urpmi are available and usable on any distribution. Even Urpmi could potentially work on any distribution, if you set up a correct package source.

Ignore the Linux worm hype, say security vendors

Filed under
Linux

Media reports circulating about the threat posed by a Linux worm called Mare.D have been written off as little more than the result of a "slow news week" by one leading antivirus expert.

Upcoming Events Highlight Free, Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

FOSDEM takes place on the 25th and 26th of February 2006 in Brussels, Belgium (see http://www.fosdem.org for more info). You are all invited to take part in the largest Free Software and Open Source event.

Dell flirts with the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

Is Dell is on its way to becoming the first tier-one PC vendor to offer a mainstream business Linux desktop to US customers? It's starting to look that way.

Inside Windows Vista, Build 5308

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has publicly passed a key milestone on the road to launching its new operating system. This release of Vista is "feature-complete", the company says, meaning that all of the fundamental capabilities that Vista will eventually offer are now baked in.

Free software developers do it to learn new skills

Filed under
OSS

Most free and open source developers participate in FOSS projects to learn and develop new skills, Rishab Ghosh of Maastricht University, told the Idlelo2 conference in Kenya this morning.

Red Hat offers Linux eye candy alternative

Filed under
Linux

The next version of Red Hat's Fedora Linux will include software to give the operating system some of the eye candy of a rival Novell project--but it will use a less intrusive mechanism, advocates say

Ubuntu, Nearly worthy of all the hype!

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

In the end, I can honestly say that Ubuntu seems to be worthy of much of it's hype.  It really is a solid, reliable and easy to use desktop Linux.  Once the installer has been simplified and if the Ubuntu team addresses the multi-media issues, it may well be worthy of all of the hype.

Making apt Work for You

Filed under
HowTos

One of the popular Linux patch management systems is based on the Advanced Package Tool, known as apt. While it was developed for Debian Linux, it is the standard patch management tool for a number of Debian and Red Hat-based distributions, including Knoppix, Xandros, and even the Lineox rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. But if you prefer apt, the associated tools can be installed on most Linux distributions.

2006: The Year Of Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Looking at open source from the VAR's or integrator's point of view, the Deloitte executives suggest - not so surprisingly - that the rise of open source could sharply reduce R&D costs, giving specialists the opportunity to really dive into development of their niche capabilities and not the more established features.

Your Next Phone Might Be Running Linux - Should You Care?

Filed under
Linux

With more than 15 million Linux handsets having already shipped into the market, most in the last year, the promise of Linux for the mobile phone industry is becoming a reality.

Easing Into Linux With Xandros Desktop OS 3.0.2

Filed under
Reviews

Since everybody doesn't run 64-bit chips yet and I still needed to do Linux reviews, I had a dilemma. How do you keep a sweet running SUSE/HP 64-bit notebook and still review 32-bit Linux versions?

ATI slammed for lack of Linux support

Filed under
Hardware

A MAN has hit out for ATI for failing to provide adequate support for its R5XX line.

Turbocharged awk

Filed under
HowTos

In a previous article, I covered the basics of awk and presented a small application to reformat address book data. Now, I'll show you how to turbocharge awk. You can improve the performance of your awk programs by uncovering bottlenecks in your code with the help of a profiler, hunting for bugs with XREF, and using Awka to increase speed.

Configuring Apache for Maximum Performance

Filed under
HowTos

Apache server performance can be improved by adding additional hardware resources such as RAM, faster CPU etc.. But, most of the time, the same result can be achieved by custom configuration of the server. This article looks into getting maximum performance out of Apache with the existing hardware resources, specifically on the Linux systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift
    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite
    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration
    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.
  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects
    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start. This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.
  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Total War: WARHAMMER

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important. So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal. Read more

Android Leftovers