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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 17 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Wayland Situation: Facts About X vs. Wayland srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:02pm
Story The trouble with UEFI Boot, and a helping hand from a BIOS firmware update srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:01pm
Story Why we need an Anti-Virus in Linux? srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:00pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.10 (Part 1) srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 9:17pm
Story Ubuntu holds its own srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:42pm
Story Fedora Day Two: Customisation srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:39pm
Story Young maker says Raspberry Pi is way to go srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:38pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 4:43am
Story One Week With GNOME 3: Conclusions srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 1:05am
Story New GNOME Control Center srlinuxx 06/06/2013 - 11:55pm

IBM vs. SCO: Now it's IBM's turn

Filed under
Legal

For months, years, it's all been about what SCO could discover about IBM, Linux, and Unix. The shoe's on the other foot now, as the US District Court in Utah has revealed that IBM has launched discovery motions against Microsoft, Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard, and BayStar Capital.

Ubuntu eyes gadgets

Filed under
Ubuntu

Three developers have launched a project to bring Ubuntu, a popular Debian-based desktop Linux distribution, to embedded Linux devices.

Open Source Clone of Windows Not a Ripoff?

Filed under
OS

In January of this year, allegations were levied against ReactOS that some code may well have been inappropriately taken from Windows NT and found its way into the open source clone. In response the ReactOS development team stopped development and downloads and began a detailed audit of their code base.

Sun shines on patch automation firm

Filed under
Linux

Sun has agreed to acquire Aduva, a small company whose products automate the installation of software patches on large numbers of Solaris or Linux computers.

Toying with a different beast: Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

I decided to investigate Linux myself, and attempt to install it on my old laptop computer. This article describes the process I’ve been through and the results, which have been interesting to say the least.

Fedora Core 5 Benchmarks

Filed under
Reviews

Since the inception of the Fedora Core Project, thanks in part to Red Hat, Fedora has been largely leading the way for other distributions to be based upon it as well as setting the bar for future Linux distributions. Just how prepared is Fedora Core 5 for hitting prime time? We shall see today as we evaluate some of its possibilities.

Pixel Image Editor Gives Graphics Goodness

Filed under
Reviews

Pixel is a multi-award-winning, multi-platform image editor aimed at the Adobe Photoshop market. Its features include layers, a wide range of effects, exporting to Web photo galleries, color management, animation, Web image maps, and more.

Linux Consultant Survey Results Are In

Filed under
Linux

Several months ago, I had the idea to contact as many Linux consultants as possible to find out how they are using Linux for their clients. Drawing on my own experiences, I came up with a list of 12 pointed but open-ended questions that would collect opinions about and uses of Linux from people who work with it on a daily basis.

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New DHCP For Linux?

Filed under
Linux

A new DHCP client for Linux is set to take advantage of an expected new feature in a future Linux kernel by automatically recognizing when a Linux user has disconnected from a particular DHCP server and look for a new connection.

Widespread Linux Practice May Violate License

Filed under
Linux

A common practice among embedded Linux developers almost certainly violates the Linux license, according to research conducted by software attorneys Jay Michaelson and Christopher Holst.

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Quake 4 1.1 Beta Update

Filed under
Gaming

id software released a beta update for Quake 4 which fixes issues and adds gameplay elements throughout both single and multiplayer - including a forecemodel option, a one-minute warning for tournament matches,Quake4 Linux fixed pure server autodownloading, Hyper-Threading Technology support, smooth stairjumping and a ton of multiplayer specific fixes.

How to get reports on OpenOffice 2.0 Base, part one

Filed under
HowTos

With databases, it's important not just to put things in correctly, but to get them out correctly. You can slam data into your database all day long, but if you can't eventually print it out for your employees, your accountant, or that nice man from the IRS, you're not playing with a full database.

Linux 101: Simplify your life with Linux package managers

Filed under
HowTos

Package managers, which are included in many Linux distributions, can simplify the overall decision making process and save you time and frustration.

Among Linux music players, Banshee really wails

Filed under
Reviews

Over the last few years, the number of Linux music players has mushroomed, providing a variety of applications to suit different people. I've tried several Linux music players since I started using the operating system, but none of them were perfect for my requirements. I recently tried out an increasingly popular music player, Banshee, and have found a new personal favourite.

LAMP on Sarge

Filed under
HowTos

This documents my adventure setting up a LAMP server on Sarge with Apache2, PHP5, MySQL5, phpMyAdmin, Smarty, and ADODB. It covers installation and just enough sample code to test everything.

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More in Tux Machines

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.  

Google: VR180, Android and the Asus Chromebook Flip C101

Security Leftovers

  • Hackers May Have Already Defeated Apple’s USB Restricted Mode For iPhone
    Recently, the iPhone-maker announced a security feature to prevent unauthorized cracking of iPhones. When the device isn’t unlocked for an hour, the Lightning port can be used for nothing but charging. The feature is a part of the iOS 12 update, which is expected to launch later this month.
  • Cops Are Confident iPhone Hackers Have Found a Workaround to Apple’s New Security Feature
    Apple confirmed to The New York Times Wednesday it was going to introduce a new security feature, first reported by Motherboard. USB Restricted Mode, as the new feature is called, essentially turns the iPhone’s lightning cable port into a charge-only interface if someone hasn’t unlocked the device with its passcode within the last hour, meaning phone forensic tools shouldn’t be able to unlock phones. Naturally, this feature has sent waves throughout the mobile phone forensics and law enforcement communities, as accessing iPhones may now be substantially harder, with investigators having to rush a seized phone to an unlocking device as quickly as possible. That includes GrayKey, a relatively new and increasingly popular iPhone cracking tool. But forensics experts suggest that Grayshift, the company behind the tech, is not giving up yet.
  • How Secure Are Wi-Fi Security Cameras?
  • Trump-Kim Meeting Was a Magnet For Russian Cyberattacks

KDE: Usability and Productivity initiative, Kraft and Konsole

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 23
    This has been a bit of a light week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative, probably because everyone’s basking in the warm glow of a well-received release: KDE Plasma 5.13 came out on Tuesday and is getting great reviews!
  • Kraft Version 0.81 Released
    I am happy to announce the release of Kraft version 0.81. Kraft is a Qt based desktop application that helps you to handle documents like quotes and invoices in your small business. Version 0.81 is a bugfix release for the previous version 0.80, which was the first stable release based on Qt5 and KDE Frameworks5. Even though it came with way more new features than just the port, it’s first release has proven it’s stability in day-to-day business now for a few month.
  • Giving Konsole some love
    I started to hack in Konsole, and first I was afraid, I was petrified. You know, touching those hardcore apps that are the center of the KDE Software Collection. I started touching it mostly because some easy to fix bugs weren’t fixed, and as every cool user knows, this is free software. So I could pay for someone to fix my bugs, or I could download the source code and try to figure out what the hell was wrong with it. I choosed the second approach.