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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 16 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Pushing open source to the limit Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:55am
Story Hands-on with PCLinuxOS 2014.05 KDE and LXDE: The Linux with something for everyone Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:50am
Story App.net's open source failure Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:43am
Story PyPy 2.3 - Terrestrial Arthropod Trap Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 11:40am
Story Kim Komando: Buy a computer for less than $100 Roy Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 7:33am
Story Linux Community Dev Ports Unreal Editor Before Epic Games Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 7:21am
Story Open source everywhere at Plovdiv military prosecution Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 7:18am
Story OpenVPN Import Broken in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 12/05/2014 - 6:27am
Story Oracle continue to circumvent EXPORT_SYMBOL_GPL() Roy Schestowitz 11/05/2014 - 8:51pm
Story Interview with Ciaran Gultnieks of F-Droid Roy Schestowitz 11/05/2014 - 8:39pm

Kingston HyperX 2GB PC2-8000

Filed under
Hardware

You want fast memory? Kingston has fast memory! Though not usually touted as the company to offer killer gaming memory, the HyperX PC2-8000 kit proves to be one of the fastest kits we've tested!

Book Review: How to do everything with PHP and MySQL

Filed under
Reviews

If you're planning to take a stab at being an open source programmer then there are harder ways to do it than to start with PHP, MySQl and Apache. This book, How to do everything with PHP & MySQL pulls together both skills into one book which, frankly, makes sense.

Linux v. Microsoft: Third World Showdown

Filed under
OS

Those of you who have followed Silicon Hutong for a while will know that I have long been a Linux-skeptic, believing firmly that despite its obvious advantages on servers, Linux would never be in a position to displace Windows on the desktop.

Well, I was wrong.

Enable password aging on Linux systems

Filed under
HowTos

Password aging is a mechanism that allows the system to enforce a certain lifetime for passwords. While this may be moderately inconvenient for users, it ensures that passwords are changed occasionally, which is a good security practice. Most Linux distributions do not enable password aging by default, but it's very easy to enable.

Jeff Waugh on Ubuntu: Community Building for Human Beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

At the 2006 Open Source Convention, Jeff Waugh, who works on Ubuntu business and community development as an employee of Canonical, describes the process by which Ubuntu's team went about creating a community with shared values and vision.

New computer OS runs on your Web browser

Filed under
Misc

When it comes to personal computer operating systems or an ''OS,'' you can count them on one hand. There's the Windows OS that you find on more personal computers than any other. Then there's Apple Computer's Macintosh OS called OS X. The third big name in operating systems is Linux. I recently found a new remote OS. This is not an OS that resides on your computer. No, the OS resides on a remote server. The entire OS runs within an ordinary Web browser.

Making wireless work in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest new features for laptop users in Ubuntu is network-manager. With this shiny new application it is finally easy to connect your Ubuntu system to any wireless network. Where previously you had to jump through hoops to do WPA or 802.1x authentication, network manager makes this completely transparent.

GNU/Linux vs. Mac: Why Apple will not dominate?

Filed under
OS

At this point there are really only three major contenders on the desktop market; Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X. It is a known fact that Windows still holds the vast majority of the market and Mac OS X is tied to computers made only by one manufacturer.

Desktop memory usage

Filed under
Software

This was actually supposed to be a follow-up to my tests of startup performance of various desktop environments, primarily KDE of course. I decided I should publish at least a shorter variant with all the numbers and some conclusions. You can do your own analyses of the numbers if you will.

How to set up a VoIP service with Xorcom Rapid, Asterisk PBX and *starShop-OSS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this howto I will show you step-by-step how to successfully set up a long distance calls service in your Cybercafé, using open source software. The main element is *starShop-OSS, an open source application designed to monitor and bill, in real time, calls made via Asterisk PBX. This service is commonly called callshop or taxiphone.

XenEnterprise 3.0 Works Well Within Limits

Filed under
Reviews

XenSource offers its first product, which is the best Xen virtualization solution eWEEK Labs has tested, although it's not yet ready to take on VMware.

The ever growing Monster

Filed under
Just talk

A simple oversight may cause some wondering WTF? I’ve been spending most of my time getting my Debian installation up and running with what I need. After a week or so I am really happy with it. Then the other day, I was trying to install something and I had run out of disk space! 23 gigs used already? for Linux?

What you should (and shouldn't) expect from 64-bit Linux

Filed under
Linux

So you just bought and assembled a brand-new AMD64 workstation. The only decision that remains is whether to install a 64-bit Linux distribution, or stick with comfortable, tried-and-true IA-32. If you are seeking an easy answer to that question, I can't help you. Running 64-bit Linux has its pros and cons. Unfortunately, a lot of the cons are out of your hands -- but they're not really Linux's fault, either.

Open source stacks move into critical operations

Filed under
Interviews

The open source stack is moving to the core of data centers -- to a place where it's responsible for handling critical parts of business operations. Support for these applications is paramount for IT departments and absolutely essential to the enterprises that use them, according to a report from The 451 Group, based in New York.

Something Out of Nothing - Ubuntu Dapper Drake (6.06 LTS) on a Packard Bell iMedia 1307

Filed under
Ubuntu

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a set of desktop computers in a more wretched state than those I saw this morning. It was going to be something of a miracle if they started up; however they did. Still, the result was not particularly pleasing. I decided to install and see if Linux could bring something as wretched as this back to life.

Which way, open-sourcers?

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this year, I wrote that the General Public License version 3 (GPLv3) would bring the open-source and free-software communities to a critical juncture. While some scoffed, the decision of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) to discount the concerns of commercial open-sourcers with the latest draft of GPLv3 threatens to split the community and slow the growth of free/libre/open-source software (FLOSS).

Educational Institutions Adopt Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat announced the growing adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Network solutions by several higher education institutions, including Wake Forest University, the University of Washington and Vanderbilt University.

Secure your Wi-Fi traffic using FOSS utilities

Filed under
HowTos

A recent Slashdot item on Wi-Fi security was a timely reminder of the weaknesses of default Wi-Fi encryption protocols, and the dangers of using unencrypted, public Wi-Fi connections. Fortunately, you can use FOSS utilities to securely tunnel your Wi-Fi connection sessions and protect your Web and email traffic.

EU warns Microsoft against tying security upgrades in Vista system

Filed under
Microsoft

European Commission on Tuesday warned US- computer giant Microsoft against bundling security upgrades into its new Windows Vista operating system.

Why is Gnome So Ugly?

Filed under
Software

Ok, so Gnome 2.16 came out a while ago. There are lots of new features. Yay for the foot. Now default Gnome is ass-ugly. Thank God the Ubuntu folks made their own theme, otherwise no one would be using Gnome at all. I'll swear by that.

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More in Tux Machines

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more

Leftovers: Linux in the Ham Shack and Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

  • LHS Episode #264: The Weekender XXI
    Welcome to the 21st Weekender episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. This time around, we talk about the few contests and special event stations that are around for December. We also touch on Linux distros to try, things to do in the amateur radio and open source world and then we dive straight into hedonism, discussing good food, good music and good spirits. Thank you for listening and Happy Holidays.
  • The Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending
    Apple’s premier gadget faces a less certain future than ever as the market shifts under its feet.

OSS Leftovers

  • The fourth industrial revolution is under way, and leaders must adopt open source thinking
    For the first time in history, knowledge is free and abundant, ordinary people are more empowered than ever before, and almost every boundary to communication has been lifted. [...] Welcome to the 21st Century where everyone and everything is connected 24/7, and where exciting progress opportunities and daunting challenges coexist. In this century, life and business have become “open source”. In order to succeed and thrive, our thoughts and actions must also become open source. It is time for business leaders to shed myths of the past, question conventional wisdom, and adopt “open source thinking” around the following fundamental questions/challenges:
  • Can real-world enterprises digest all this open-source, startup stuff?
    Why does the Cloud Native Computing Foundation now host more than 30 projects? Why are cloud-based startups coming out of the woodwork with narrow point solutions? Mostly just so users can have a better time with an application. But it’s all getting a bit weedy. How can enterprises pick out the right technologies from the aisles of them? “It’s really easy to forget that infrastructure is not a thing in its own right — it’s solely there to enable applications and to enable other things,” said Steve Herrod (pictured), managing director at General Catalyst Partners LLC.
  • CableLabs Open Source IoT Project Shoots for Scale
    Opening up another chapter in its open source story, CableLabs this week took another shot at the industrial Internet of Things market with its LPWAN Server project. The general concept is to create open source LPWAN Server software that can run on off-the-shelf hardware and support a wide range of low-power, IoT wireless technologies designed to transmit small bits of data over long distances. (See Blog: CableLabs Intros Open Source LPWAN Server.) "We don't see one clear winner in the LPWAN space," said Daryl Malas, principal architect at CableLabs' advanced technology group. "We don't see NB-IoT (Narrowband IoT) dominating all use cases. And we don't see LoRA dominating all use cases."
  • The 10 Coolest New Open-Source Technologies And Tools Of 2018
  • The fight to keep ideas open to all
     

    “The only way we can preserve and nurture other and more precious freedoms is by relinquishing the freedom to breed.” This ominous sentence comes not from China’s one-child policy but from one of the 20th century’s most influential—and misunderstood—essays in economics. “The tragedy of the commons”, by Garrett Hardin, marks its 50th anniversary on December 13th.  

    The article, published in the journal Science, was a neo-Malthusian jeremiad about uncontrolled population growth. But it is remembered for the image that the title conjures up and for the anecdotes that Hardin used. The idea behind it is as simple as it is profound: a resource freely available to all will be used inefficiently. An actual common will inevitably be overgrazed. Who would restrict their cattle if other herders may not follow suit?  

  • Suriname community uses new open-source app to preserve storytelling traditions
    To prevent that from happening, the local community-based organization Stichting voor Dorpsontwikkeling Matawai has spent the last few years documenting their oral storytelling traditions using video recorders and interactive maps. With support from the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), the organization trained younger Matawai to record and interview their elders about the numerous named places and sites in their ancestral lands.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a Second Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors to Spur Open Innovation
    Flute is a configurable 5-stage application processor complementing the previously released 3-stage Piccolo microcontroller, both of which are suitable for IoT. The initial release provides synthesizable Verilog for a bare metal RV32IMA core and a supervisor level RV64IMA core. Future releases will add floating point and compressed instructions (RV32GC/RV64GC) and run Linux and FreeRTOS. The Flute download (here) provides working Verilator and Icarus simulations and the Verilog has been tested in Xilinx UltraScale/UltraScale+ boards.

Schedule a visit with the Emacs psychiatrist

Welcome to another day of the 24-day-long Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. We’re figuring that out as we go, but generally, it could be a game, or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal. Some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone. Today's selection is a hidden gem inside of Emacs: Eliza, the Rogerian psychotherapist, a terminal toy ready to listen to everything you have to say. Read more