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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 23 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Clonezilla Live 2.2.3-10 Is Now Stable and Based on Linux Kernel 3.14.4 Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 10:05pm
Story Wayland & Weston 1.5 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 9:59pm
Story SliTaz 5.0 RC2 Is a Minimalistic OS Built from Scratch Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 9:51pm
Story Stable Channel Update: Chrome 35 Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 9:23pm
Story Qt Creator 3.1.1 Lands Alongside Qt 5.3 Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 8:49pm
Story TechView: Linus Torvalds, Inventor of Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 8:25pm
Story Would You Give Linux a Whirl? Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 8:22pm
Story OPW Intern Develops QR Code for Linux Kernel Oops Messages Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 8:11pm
Story NVIDIA Pushes Down The 331.79 Linux Driver With Bug-Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 7:38pm
Story Linux Kernel 2.6.32.62 LTS Released After One-Year Hiatus Rianne Schestowitz 20/05/2014 - 7:34pm

Spanish Region Goes Entirely Open Source

Filed under
OSS

The Spanish region of Extremadura has gone open source, deciding to move its entire administration to Linux and open-source software within a year.

Book Review: Unix to Linux Porting - A Comprehensive Reference

Filed under
Reviews

In this age of numerous flavours of Unix and Linux OSes, it is imperative that applications are developed to work on a vast majority of them. But historically, Unix had been fractured. This book aims to be a capacious guide for developers who are into porting Unix applications to Linux.

Enable permissive mode for SELinux troubleshooting purpose

Filed under
HowTos

SELinux may create problem for network service if not configured properly. So you can turn off SELinux temporarily i.e. permissive mode for SELinux.

Red Hat's affair with XenSource is back on

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat today scrambled to repair its relationship with XenSource after a report from ZDNet Australia presented a major technological rift between the two companies.

Issue #16 of TUX Magazine

Filed under
Linux

The August 2006 issue of TUX is now available to download. This month includes a look at Amarok, KdeTV, and Mplayer as well as A Beginner's Guide to Kino and a review of Slackware 10.2.

The Zen of Open Source

Filed under
OSS

"Open source is not just a matter of altruism--it's also good economic sense," said Sun Microsystems' Simon Phipps (pictured) in a recent speech. "Sun has now contributed more lines of open source code than any other organization, including the University of California, Berkeley," he said.

Issue 13 of Free Software Magazine

Filed under
OSS

Issue 13 of Free Software Magazine brings you a bunch of fine articles covering various aspects of the free software world. We have Richard Fennimore showing us how to spruce up Ubuntu, Robin Monks plays with a few of the best Tetris clones and John Goerzen tells you who to call for your free software phone needs. Plus, Robert Pogson teaches us how to set up class using Edubuntu, LTS and thin clients and much more... Download.

Bash typecasting

Filed under
HowTos

A recent post here mentioned typecasting in the shell. I responded by advising the poster to use some other language for his scripting needs. My feeling is that while I do appreciate that Bash can be used for complicated tasks, I just don't see the point.

Nvclock 0.8beta2

Today a new beta version of NVClock a tweaking tool for Nvidia videocards has been released. The new version contains tons of bugfixes and support for the latest videocards.

Put your laptop to sleep

Filed under
HowTos

Part of proper power management is the ability to put your laptop to sleep. ACPI sleep is defined as a state where the system is still technically powered on, but the screen and hard disk are powered down and the computer is using just enough power to keep the contents of RAM alive. The Ubuntu development team has devoted an immense amount of effort toward getting ACPI power management working properly.

Novell bans proprietary Linux modules

Filed under
SUSE

In a change of heart, Novell has ceased distributing proprietary software modules such as 3D video drivers that plug into the Linux kernel.

Autodesk Unveils Linux Supported Maya 8

Filed under
Software

Autodesk launched Autodesk Maya 8 software, the newest version of its Academy Award-winning 3D modeling, animation and rendering solution. Maya has been used by a variety of clients, including BMW, CNN, Disney, Epic Games, Industrial Light & Magic, Midway Games and Weta Digital, to create breathtaking 3D imagery for feature films, interactive games, broadcast graphics and industrial design.

KOffice 1.6 Alpha Released

Filed under
KDE
Software

Swiftly following the latest bugfix release for KOffice 1.5, the KDE Project today announced the release of KOffice 1.6 alpha. This is the first preview release for KOffice 1.6, scheduled for release this October.

Mandriva 2007 Beta 1

Filed under
MDV
Reviews
-s

Like everyone else in Linuxville, I've been looking forward to the release of Mandriva's first 2007 beta. When it began appearing on mirrors Sunday, I immediately began the download of the i586-x86_64 DVD. It took almost 24 hours to download, but it made it. Was it worth the bother?

Symphony OS marches to a different drum

Filed under
Linux

Symphony OS is a GNU/Linux distribution designed to innovate from the ground up. Although originally based on Knoppix and now on Debian stable, it quickly differentiates itself from the bulk of distros by implementing the ideas articulated in a so-called grey paper on user interface design by Jason Spisak, one of the co-founders of Lycoris. Often, Symphony's implementations challenge UI assumptions on any platform.

Oracle to distribute Red Hat?

Filed under
Linux

Larry Ellison has stirred up the Linux market again, sparking speculation Oracle may start shipping a cut-price version of Red Hat

Free software without the strings

Filed under
Software

When I see something free, I always look for the hidden cost such as those presented to me with pop-up ads. Free smiley faces? I don’t bite. Free cursors? No, thank you. But sometimes the extra work is worth it when you find a piece of free software that does the same job as a program that costs more than $50.

Linux needs to disappear

Filed under
OS

Okay, I confess that I chose this headline to draw you into this blog entry. A more accurate headline would be "Operating systems need to disappear". But I don't want my meaning to be misconstrued. The term "operating systems" would have to include proprietary operating systems.

Apache's Java brings Harmony to the world

Filed under
Software

THE FOLKS are churning code like there's no tomorrow at Apache's Project Harmony. The goal is to build a Java VM compatible with Sun's specifications and now the people have quietly released test binary snapshots.

Open Source Lures Cost Conscious CIOs

Midmarket CIOs who yearn for high-end functionality but can't foot the bill are turning to emerging open source vendors. Although there are risks, experts say it's an opportunity to get in on cutting-edge technology for a more reasonable price.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Compact Bay Trail SBC has option for third GbE port
    Axiomtek’s “CAPA84E” is a 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC with an optional third GbE port, dual M.2 slots, plus VGA, DisplayPort, USB 3.0, SATA, and -20 to 70°C support. Axiomtek’s motto may well be: “If first you succeed, iterate until you don’t.” The king of the spinoffs has released yet another iteration of one of the first Intel Bay Trail SBCs, the CAPA841, which in 2015 was followed by the slightly scaled down CAPA840. The new CAPA84R similarly supports Bay Trail and conforms to the 3.5-inch form factor, but with a different mix of features.
  • Letting people work where they want shows how much you value them
    Open organizations are inclusive. They aren't inclusive solely because it's the right way to be but because it produces better outcomes. Inclusivitiy enables a more diverse set of viewpoints.
  • Cities agree on minimal interoperability mechanisms

    Over a hundred European cities have agreed on ‘Minimal Interoperability Mechanisms’ defining the communication between software programmes and building blocks to allow co-creation and sharing of services. The MIMs, advocated by the Open & Agile Smart Cities (OASC) initiative, are “simple steps towards using new technology”, OACS chairman Martin Brynskov said on Thursday.

  • Containers On The Edge
    There are two major families for the choice of operating system and ecosystem: RTOS-based and Linux-based families. Smaller, cost-constrained devices tend to benefit from the simplicity of RTOS-based, while more full-featured and complex devices benefit from the richness of Linux (see The Shift to Linux Operating Systems for IoT for more background on the reasons for these approaches in IoT). Linux has been used in embedded devices for almost as long as it has existed (see here for an excellent timeline of early embedded Linux usage by Chris Simmons). The focus here is on Linux based products, as they have the needed functions such as access controls and memory segregation that allows for upgrading portions in a controlled fashion.
  • YouTuber Fits A Fully Functional Computer Into A Mouse
    While the YouTuber’s original plan was to squeeze a Raspberry Pi inside of a regular computer mouse but was unable to do so due to size constraints. Hence, he 3D printed a computer mouse to fit the components of the computer inside the mouse. Dubbed as “The Computer Mouse”, the device consists of a Raspberry Pi Zero W computer, a 1.5-inch color OLED LCD display with a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels, a 3D-printed mouse, a rechargeable 500 mAh battery, and a tiny Bluetooth retractable keyboard for text inputs and more complicated commands. It also has a power button at the edge to start the tiny computer. Further, it runs GNU/Linux-based operating systems such as Raspbian.
  • Microsoft Wallet for Windows Phone to be retired in February
    Support is set to end for all Windows 10 Mobile devices by the end of this year, and Microsoft is already beginning to retire apps in anticipation. In an update to the , Microsoft has noted that the app will be "officially retired" on February 28, 2019. Microsoft Wallet is the official tap-to-pay method for Windows Phones, similar to Apple Pay and Google Pay on iPhones and Android devices. The app also allows users to load up their loyalty and membership cards, allowing them all to be stored in one place.
  • mintCast 300.5 interview 5 Joe Ressington

Phoronix Test Suite Improvements

  • Making It Even Easier To Gauge Your System's Performance
    For those trying to understand their system's performance on a macro level will enjoy a new feature being introduced with Phoronix Test Suite 8.6-Spydeberg for seeing how your CPU/system/GPU/storage/network performance compares at scale to the massive data sets amassed by OpenBenchmarking.org and the Phoronix Test Suite over the past decade.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 Milestone 2 Released For Open-Source Benchmarking
    Two weeks since the initial Phoronix Test Suite 8.6 development release, the second milestone release is now available for your open-source, cross-platform benchmarking evaluation.

GNOME and KDE: GTK, KEXI, KookBook and Krita

  • Theme changes, revisited
    We’ve made a 3.24.4 release, to fix up a few oversights in 3.24.3. This release does not include the new theme yet, we will push that to the next release. We’ve also made another NewAdwaita tarball, which includes refinements based on some of the suggestions we received since last week.
  • KEXI 3.2 Beta
    Yesterday KEXI 3.2 Beta shipped, effect of improvements from entire 2018. Full info in the wiki. That's best KEXI to date! Pun intended because among other things one is especially worth mentioning, entirely new and final date/time grammar for user's SQL.
  • KookBook 0.2.1 – now actually kind of useful
    There was a snag in the KookBook 0.2.0 release, and 0.2.1 is available.
  • Krita Interview with Edgar Tadeo
    Comparing to Photoshop, I think Krita can make good digital painting that looks like it was made with a real brush. However,  PS is not a paint program, Krita’s advantage is its brushes.