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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

This is something really nasty in the XP filing system... it's in Windows Media Player, and it not only has all the information about Digital Rights Management, it also has all the information about your local police force..... QED... Not only is microsoft spying on you, they are also telling the cops what you have got on your system....

lego rubick’s cube robot

Filed under
Sci/Tech

correct me if i’m wrong, but technology was supposed to make our lives easier, take care of us, make us dinner, raise our children, and, fulfill our every dream.

so what has technology done for you lately? nothing? well, my friend, today we have a hack that will change your life forever. today sammo sent us a link to jp brown’s amazing rubick’s cube solving robot.

the final task on my big list of things to do can finally be crossed off. life is good.

Link to full story.

Gas prices on verge of setting a record

Filed under
Misc

The average U.S. retail price for regular-grade gasoline rose 5.7 cents to $2.056 a gallon in the week ended today, less than a cent below the all-time record reached in May, the Energy Department said.

Gasoline prices across the U.S. have climbed since mid- February as refiners passed along higher costs for crude oil, which makes up about half the motor fuel's price. Oil futures in New York have climbed 26 percent this year to $54.95 a barrel today, the highest since October.

Nvidia core G80 emerges

Filed under
Hardware

NVIDIA'S NEXT generation graphic remains a well protected secret. We still managed to get some information about it, despite that. We confirmed that G70 is the real thing and we learned that Nvidia has one more chip down the road codenamed the G80.

MSN TV hacker jailed

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A Louisiana man has been sent to prison for six months for sending a malicious e-mail to Microsoft MSN TV customers.

The e-mails the convicted man sent out contained an attachment that the mails claimed would re-set their TV’s display colours when opened. Instead, the attachment contained script that re-programmed customers’ TV boxes to dial 911 instead of a local phone number to access Microsoft’s servers.

'Best blogs on the web' honoured

Filed under
Web

The best of the web's blogs - online diaries or websites where people publish their thoughts - have been recognised in the annual Bloggies. The winners from 30 categories were announced at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Texas, US. Boing Boing won the coveted overall best blog prize.

Geekfathers: CyberCrime Mobs Revealed

Filed under
Legal

Crime is now organized on the Internet. Operating in the anonymity of cyberspace, Web mobs with names like Shadowcrew and stealthdivision are building networks that help crackers and phishers, money launderers and fences skim off some of the billions that travel through the Web every day.

Internet Access Tax May Not Be Dead

Filed under
Web

Thought you were free from paying new taxes on your Internet access, at least for the next four years? The Internet Tax Non-Discrimination Act was supposed to put a moratorium on new Net taxes. That, however, hasn't stopped some in Washington from suggesting that old taxes might be applied in new ways.

KDE 3.4 Out?

Filed under
News

Well, no, not officially, but distro developers are beginning to leak them. They appeared in this morning's gentoo portage (masked) and PLD mirrors.

Scheduled to be officially released Wednesday, March 16, the natives are getting restless. Myself? Definitely. I'm debating whether to start the download now or wait. I'm also debating whether to use ebuilds or tarballs. Decisions, decisions, decisions...

New game of tagging may be "it"

Filed under
Web

One of the more tantalizing, if not confounding, innovations in how people share information on the Web has to do with a new process called tagging.

Promulgated by a site called del.icio.us, tagging has to do with on-the-fly categorization of Web links. It's like a do-it-yourself Dewey Decimal System for the Web, except that it really isn't a system at all. At least, not yet.

Securing Slackware

Filed under
Linux
Using the exec-shield Kernel Patch on Slackware 10.1

by Kurt Fitzner

The Holy Grail of most any hacker trying to get access to a system is the remote buffer overflow attack. Well, actually, it's finding a Windows PC not protected by a firewall, but the remote buffer overflow attack is a (somewhat) close second. This article will discus one way to help protect against this type of attack on a Slackware Linux system with the installation of a special system called exec-shield.

Interview, interview, they've all got it in to view

Filed under
KDE

On LugRadio Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, Ade Bradshaw, and Matt Revell talk about Linux and whatever else comes along, including:

Aaron Seigo, KDE developer, talks about what KDE's up to and dispels some myths about the desktop environment.

Link.

10 Reasons to Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

From the new "First and Only Magazine for the New Linux User" comes 10 Reasons to Switch to Linux.

  • It Doesn't Crash

  • Viruses Are Few and Far Between
  • Virtually Hardware-Independent
  • Freedom of Choice
  • Standards

Souped-up cellphones like tiny PCs

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A road warrior, Chad Stevens used to shuttle from airport to construction site to hotel, waiting until evening to catch up on the 200 e-mails accumulated each day on his laptop.

These days Stevens, who owns a travel-services business, leaves his laptop at home and uses his palmOne Treo to check e-mail, calendar appointments, driving directions and updates from his Web site — whether he's at a job site, at a stoplight or on his living-room couch.

Pimp my Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox straight 'out of the zip' is ok, but there's a lot you can change, modify and improve. From performance to looks to usability, Firefox tuning gives you the power to make a browser specific to your needs and taste.

CompUSA fingered by feds over rebates

Filed under
Legal

EVER WONDER about those Big Box rebate offers on computer kit being too good to be true? Still waiting for your rebate cheque to arrive? The US government is starting to move against companies that aren't paying up on time. On Friday, March 11, the United States Federal Trade Commission (here) settled charges against CompUSA and the offices of peripherals manufacturer QPS. Inc for "allegedly failing to pay, in a timely manner, thousands of rebates for products sold under the CompUSA and QPS brands."

Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers

Filed under
Misc

In reference to the article claiming beer isn't fattening, theregister received many letters disputing the findings. We laughed, we cried, ...it contains something for everyone. Link.

US DHS buys more name analysis tools

Filed under
Security

The Homeland Security Department's Customs and Border Protection agency, an arm of the Border and Transportation Security Directorate, has signed a sole-source contract with Language Analysis Systems Inc. of Herndon, Va., for additional software to help analyze names of people.

The software is particularly useful in winnowing the names of terrorists out of lists of passengers or other data sources.

Bringing $100 laptops to developing world

Filed under
Hardware

In rural Cambodian villages with no electricity, nighttime darkness is pierced by the glow from laptop computers that children bring home from school.

The kids belong to three schools that Nicholas Negroponte of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has equipped with inexpensive notebook computers.

"When the kids bring them home and open them up, it's the brightest light source in the home."

MADSHRIMPS Piotke's CeBIT Review

Filed under
Hardware
Humor

lol Piotke's review of Cebit is a little different than most all the others', in that his is a visual tour consisting solely of pictures. Not the same boring ole hardware for Piotke, no. He had a better time than most I would say!

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Tux Machines Privacy Statement

Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat. Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.

today's leftovers

  • S11E12 – Twelve Years a Slave
    It’s Season 11 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • Porting guide from Qt 1.0 to 5.11
    We do try to keep breakages to a minimum, even in the major releases, but the changes do add up. This raises the question: How hard would it be to port a Qt application from Qt 1.0 to 5.11?
  • Thunderbolt Networking on Linux
    Thunderbolt allows for peer-to-peer network connections by connecting two computers directly via a thunderbolt cable. Mika from Intel added support for this to the 4.15 kernel. Recently, Thomas Haller from NetworkManager and I worked together to figure out what needs to be done in userspace to make it work. As it turns out, it was not that hard and the pull-request was merged swiftly.
  • What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15 – part 1
    openSUSE Leap 15 will be released on the 25th of May 2018! A new openSUSE release is always an exciting event. This means that I get to play with all kinds of new and improved software packages. I am aware that I can simply install openSUSE Tumbleweed and have a new release 4 or 5 times a week. But when using openSUSE Tumbleweed some time ago, I noticed that I was installing Gigabytes of new software packages multiple times per week. The reason for that is that I have the complete opposite of a minimum install. I always install a lot of applications to play / experiment with (including a lot of open source games). I am using openSUSE since 2009 and it covers all of my needs and then some. I am already happy with the available software, so there is no real reason for me to move with the speed of a rolling release. Therefore I prefer to move with the slower pace of the Leap releases.
  • GNOME Terminal: a little something for Fedora 29
    Can you spot what that is?
  • UBports To Work On Unity 8 / Mir / Wayland After OTA-4
    The UBports team have put out their latest batch of answers to common questions around this project that's still working to maintain the Ubuntu Touch software stack. Among the project's recent work has included getting QtWebEngine working on Mir and before their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS based release they still need to figure out Chromium crashes and to resolve that as well as updating the browser. For their first release of UBports derived from Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial" they are still going to rely upon Oxide while later on should migrate to a new browser.
  • 8 Best App Locks For Android To Secure Your Device In 2018
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 39
  • What's Coming in OpenStack Rocky?
    The OpenStack Rocky release is currently scheduled to become generally available on August 30th, and it's expected to add a host of new and enhanced capabilities to the open-source cloud platform. At the OpenStack Summit here, Anne Bertucio, marketing manager at the OpenStack Foundation, and Pete Chadwick, director of product management at SUSE, outlined some of the features currently on the Rocky roadmap. Bertucio began the session by warning the audience that the roadmap is not prescriptive, but rather is intended to provide a general idea of the direction the next OpenStack release is taking.
  • PostgreSQL 11 Is Continuing With More Performance Improvements, JIT'ing
    PostgreSQL 11 is the next major feature release of this open-source database SQL server due out later in 2018. While it's not out yet, their release notes were recently updated for providing an overview of what's coming as part of this next major update. To little surprise, performance improvements remain a big focus for PostgreSQL 11 with various optimizations as well as continued parallelization work and also the recently introduced just-in-time (JIT) compilation support.
  • Tidelift Secures $15M in Series A Funding
    Tidelift, a Boston, MA-based open source software startup, secured $15m in Series A funding.
  • Tesla disclosed some of its autopilot source code after GPL violation
    Tesla, a technology company, and the independent automaker are well known for offering the safest, quickest electric cars. The company uses a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, etc also they have always been taciturn about the finer details and tech of its popular artefacts, such as Model S, Model X, but now Elon Musk’s company has just released some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.
  • Open Source Underwater Distributed Sensor Network
    One way to design an underwater monitoring device is to take inspiration from nature and emulate an underwater creature. [Michael Barton-Sweeney] is making devices in the shape of, and functioning somewhat like, clams for his open source underwater distributed sensor network.
  • Security Researchers Discover Two New Variants of the Spectre Vulnerability
  • Security updates for Thursday

today's howtos

Games and Wine: Hacknet - Deluxe, Full Metal Furies and More