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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nouveau's Big Batch Of Changes Land In Linux 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 6:44pm
Story Slackware and Salix-Based Distro Slackel Fluxbox 1.0 Live Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 6:37pm
Story The Exciting Features Merged So Far For Linux 3.17 Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 6:33pm
Story How to Choose the Best Linux Desktop for You Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 6:33pm
Story Next Week We Should Hear All About OpenGL 5.0 Rianne Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 4:38pm
Story PyKDE5 Status Roy Schestowitz 10/08/2014 - 10:02am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 09/08/2014 - 9:59pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 09/08/2014 - 9:59pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 09/08/2014 - 9:59pm
Story KDE Frameworks 5.1.0 and Plasma 5.0.1 on the horizon Roy Schestowitz 09/08/2014 - 9:48pm

The Challenges of Open Source in Non-Profits

Filed under
OSS

Open source seems to present a number of obstacles to those making technical purchasing decisions in those businesses that are classified non-profit. The interesting facet of this discussion, however, is that the same business needs exist in not-for-profit institutions as it does in for-profit ones. This article attempts to survey some of those issues facing open source in the not-for-profit sector of the business world.

Half a century of hard drives

Filed under
Hardware

Hard drives radically changed the way the world stores data. Hard drives have come a long way since debuting 50 years ago this week. Do they still have room to shrink?

Debian Etch is not ready for release

Filed under
Linux

I'm scared by Debian etch. It'll probably become the worst Debian release ever. It's going to hurt our reputation.

Mark Shuttleworth: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth is polishing his image: Reuter's has a story which says «Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft», and Mark's own blog addresses the Debian/Ubuntu conflictual relationship: «Conflicting goals create tension in communities». I couldn't possibly trust these sayings.

Moving to freedom, one step at a time

Filed under
Linux

Time to get on with the move. Giving up Windows is like kicking a drug habit. It’s easier to take the path of least resistance and keep using. If quitting proprietary software was a twelve step program—although, let’s not push the analogy too far.

Debian Etch Beta3 Graphical-mode installation With screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Etch is the codename for the upcoming release of Debian, which will also be known as Debian GNU/Linux 4.0. Etch has been the testing “release” of the Debian distribution since the release of the current stable version, 3.1 (codenamed Sarge), on June 6th 2005. The project is currently aiming at a December 4 2006 release date.I have created easy debian etch installation process with nearly 50 images.You need to click on thumbnail image to view full image size.

Xgl and Compiz bling for Dapper

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

By now, if you haven't seen Compiz and Xgl in action, you probably have heard of it. You may even be wanting to set it up yourself. If so, this guide is here for you.

Embracing Unix and Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

Unix and Linux clients can do quite well on a Windows network. Microsoft, in fact, released its own Services for Unix, which provides some basic cross-compatibility features for Unix clients accessing Windows servers. Other, more robust interoperability solutions are also available for various network services. Fortunately, Unix has been using TCP/IP for longer than Windows, so the two operating systems at least have a networking protocol in common.

Computing systems for business: Linux or Mac?

Filed under
OS

Is there an alternative for original Microsoft Windows to substitute the pirated Microsoft Windows and Office on your office computers?

Hire company charges ahead with Linux

Filed under
Linux

Kennards Hire is ready to replace Windows server with Linux at 90 branches, to accompany 400 desktops already running the open source operating system.

CLI Magic: Kismet sniffs out Wi-Fi access

Filed under
HowTos

Today, Wi-Fi access points everywhere, and users becoming increasingly more sophisticated in their wireless network knowledge. One good tool for discovering Wi-Fi access points is a command-line utility called Kismet. It can help with a range of issues, from diagnosing Wi-Fi interference problems to finding a particular network in a sea of airborne bits.

Microsoft will always beat Open Source

Filed under
OSS

OPEN SOURCE will always be a poor cousin to Microsoft, according to a report by boffins at Harvard Business School.

Millionaire cosmonaut takes on Microsoft

Filed under
Ubuntu

South African magnate Mark Shuttleworth has already conquered space. Now he's set his sights on cyberspace where he hopes to challenge Microsoft.

An even better BitTorrent client for Linux!

Filed under
Software

Well, after all the problems with Transmission and popular trackers like OiNK and Demonoid I decided to try something else. I tried out Tribler, but it wasn't that good, so after snooping around the Ubuntu forums I found about this relatively new client called qBittorrent.

A couple of tricks with the secure shell

Filed under
HowTos

One can do a lot more with ssh than use it for remote terminal session. Here we'll show how to copy files using ssh, use ssh as part of a pipe, vnc or samba forwarding via ssh and mounting filesystems using ssh (fuse + sshfs)

Linux on laptops

Filed under
Linux

Although most modern laptops nowadays tend to scare people off with an ugly “Designed for Windows XP” mark, it does not mean that alternative operating systems, like GNU/Linux cannot be installed and function equally well. In this article I would like to describe a few common issues with Linux on laptops and maybe bust a few myths about using GNU/Linux on mobile computers.

Siemens' Medical Unit Puts Suse Linux Into MRI Products

Filed under
SUSE

Novell and Concurrent announced that Siemens Medical Solutions, a developer of MRI technology and applications, has selected the Suse Linux enterprise real-time operating system and NightStar application development tools for its Magnetom magnetic resolution imaging (MRI) products.

Philippine bill requires open source use in govt

Filed under
OSS

REP. Teodoro Casiño is expected to file a bill this week mandating the use of free and open source software and open standards in all government projects.

What’s wrong with Free Beer?

Filed under
OSS

Freedom. It’s such a loaded term. It represents so many things: the ability to do stuff unfettered, letting the press say whatever they want, invading foreign nations to pass the time, a glorious ideal. “Free” means lots of things. Free as in libre... Free as in beer... Interestingly enough, they aren’t as different as you might think!

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More in Tux Machines

Server: FreedomBox, Cumulus Network and SUSE

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    You might have heard of FreedomBox. If not, it's a $100 box you can buy, which allows you to take back control of your internet-based services (See: Put the internet back under your control with the FreedomBox).
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    Cumulus Networks has overhauled its data center tool set for network troubleshooting and change validation, adding a mainstream, enterprise-friendly graphical dashboard. The pure-play networking company launched the graphical user interface (GUI) this week as a component of Cumulus NetQ 2.0. The latest version of the network operations tool set also includes a new database for storing and managing more network telemetry data than the previous version. With the latest release, Cumulus has revamped NetQ to address the needs of a broader segment of the market for enterprise data center networking, said Brad Casemore, an analyst at IDC. Cumulus has three primary offerings: a Linux-based network operating system; branded hardware switches, called Cumulus Express; and NetQ.
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    Cloud 9 is a complex beast, and so is its documentation. And like any other beast, the documentation needs occasional grooming.

Kernel: APIs, KernelShark 1.0, VMware, NVIDIA and AMD

  • Linux and MS-Windows APIs for Custom Development of VQuad™ Applications
    Speaking to the press Mr. Robert Bichefsky, Director of Engineering at GL Communications Inc said, “Open source is ubiquitous, it’s almost unavoidable and Linux is the leader in open source. So, GL supports Linux Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for our flagship products!
  • KernelShark 1.0 Soon Being Released For Visualizing "Trace-cmd" Linux Kernel Tracing
    After being in development pretty much this entire decade, KernelShark 1.0 will soon be released as the visualizer around the trace-cmd that wraps Ftrace for internal Linux kernel tracing. KernelShark produces various visuals and makes it easier to analyze the trace data generated from the tracing tools to make it easier to understand the behavior going on within the kernel. It's good to see this GUI utility still advancing as it's been quite a while since last hearing anything about KernelShark.
  • VMware Working On Emulated Coherent Graphics Memory - Needed For GL 4.4 / Vulkan
    For ironing out the OpenGL 4.4+ support within their VMWGFX virtual graphics driver stack and/or for starting out work on bringing up Vulkan support to guest VMs running VMware virtualization products, their longtime graphics driver team is working on emulated coherent graphics memory support. Longtime Mesa contributor Thomas Hellstrom, who had been with Tungsten Graphics before being acquired by VMware, posted their latest code on Wednesday for emulating coherent graphics memory support as needed by the latest OpenGL revisions and Vulkan.
  • How to Build a Network Video Recorder With an Nvidia Jetson Nano
    In the middle of working on an update to our articles on home video surveillance systems, I bought one of Nvidia’s new Jetson Nanos. While playing with the $99 board and using it to do object recognition using a variety of cameras, it suddenly occurred to me that it would be a pretty interesting starting point for a slick little Network Video Recorder (NVR) NAS device. It consumes very little power and is portable. Plus, the integrated GPU has more AI capacity than most larger NAS units, and the Nano comes with tons of AI tools pre-installed. So for those wanting to play with their own motion or person or package or pet recognition, it’d be ideal. [...] Nvidia makes it really easy to set up the Nano. All you need is a microSD card and a computer to flash the L4T (Linux For Tegra) image. Technically, all you need is 16GB, but the system takes most of that, so I used a high-speed 64GB card. Once you’ve attached a keyboard, mouse, and monitor, all you need to do is plug in a micro USB power supply and you’ll be running Ubuntu 18.04. A wide variety of AI tools and demo applications are pre-installed for you.
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    AMD has already started dropping Navi driver code out into the wider Linux ecosystem, with a few key code drops in place right now and full driver enablement for the new graphics architecture likely to drop soon. These first little bits of Linux code don’t really tell us a whole lot about the new graphics cards, but do at least seem to nix all the recent rumours about Navi being built on a different design to the current Graphics Core Next setup. So yeah, Navi looks set to be GCN. There had been earlier rumours that Navi would be the first post-GCN GPU design, and that would allow it to break past the 4,096 core limit supposedly imposed by the current macro-architecture, but it seems Navi is following the same overall path as previous GCN designs.

Best Linux Laptops

Buying a Linux laptop is just like buying any other; you need to find one that fits both what what you need it to do and your price range. That's a bit of a sticking point compared to Windows-powered laptops. Linux has been a niche "product" since its beginnings in 1991. Companies like Acer or Toshiba aren't cranking out inexpensive sub-$500 laptops that run Linux and probably never will. Finding a great Linux laptop is easy; companies like Dell and Lenovo cater to the enterprise crowd, while small but very reputable companies like System 76 cater to the enthusiasts. In theory, you can install Linux on any laptop if you're willing to go through the headache of finding the right configuration for the hardware inside, and that's a good option if you're technically inclined to do it. And lucky enough for it to work. Read more

Ubuntu: EOL for Ubuntu Studio 16.04 LTS, Ubuntu 19.10 Daily Builds Are Live and New Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo

  • Ubuntu Studio 16.04 LTS reaches End Of Life (EOL)
    As of today, April 25, 2019, Ubuntu Studio 16.04 LTS has reached the end of its support cycle. We strongly urge all users of 16.04 to upgrade to Ubuntu Studio 18.04 and add the Ubuntu Studio Backports PPA for support through April 2020, which is when our next LTS release, 20.04, is expected.
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