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Tuesday, 23 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story No Chaos KaOS, LibreSSL Fixed, and More KDE 5 Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 6:55am
Story Cheery social robot owes it all to its inner Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/07/2014 - 6:51am
Story 25 Best Open Source Android Apps for Small Business Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:51pm
Story Red Hat Delivers Enterprise-Grade Ceph Storage Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:45pm
Story The Developers Can Get The First MDK (Module Development Kit) Of Google’s Project ARA In July Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:21pm
Story SparkyLinux 3.4.1 Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 9:02pm
Story ARM MPD Still Not Doing Open Drivers; ARM Vendors Hiding Behind Linaro Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 8:58pm
Story Why Women in Tech Can, and Should, Write a Better Resume Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 8:08pm
Story Rugged Android tablet boasts all-day battery Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 7:46pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 16/07/2014 - 6:28pm

Linux pinfo

Filed under
HowTos

I have never liked Linux "info". The reason is simple enough: I don't like Emacs, and "info" uses an emacs style interface. Pinfo displays the same "info" files, but is more lynx like; up and down arrows move you from clickable link to clickable link, right arrow invokes a link, left arrow returns you to the previous page.

Red Hat evolves with a techie camp

Filed under
Linux

Ethan Boyette has known for some time that he wanted be a computer engineer. But when it came to a possible employer, Red Hat was never on the list. That is, until this week.

Also: Red Hat Looks To Symposium To Spread The Gospel

Accessing network resources in a mixed environment

Filed under
HowTos

The first thing that comes to most sysadmins' minds when they hear about file and print services in mixed Windows and Linux environments is probably Samba, but you can also make a rock-solid system for sharing resources via NFS on the *nix platform and DiskShare on Windows.

Kubuntu Clash: Should I stay or should I go?

Over the past month or so I have been dipping my big toe into the Linux pool, just testing the waters. The reason for a move to Linux isn't one based on the love of open source, free choice or free software, the reason is far more capital, the devil drives when the bills need paying, work. Anyway, over the past weeks of swimming with Linux I've had less sleep than I have in a long long while, I've been more frustrated, argumentative, pounding the keyboard and flicking the finger(s) at the screen. Is this the norm?

n/a

Firefox 2.0 Beta 1 Is No Slam-Dunk

Filed under
Moz/FF
Reviews

Review: eWEEK Labs' tests show that Version 2.0 of the browser will be a worthy upgrade, but competitors—including Internet Explorer 7—are inching ahead.

Debian server hacked

Filed under
Security

"Early this morning we discovered that someone had managed to compromise gluck.debian.org," Debian developer James Troup wrote in an e-mail to the Debian community shortly before 4am AEST.

Windows power user tries Xandros

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I recently performed an experiment at the request of my husband, GeekTimeLinux Dave. He was preparing to review the new Xandros distribution, which has been described as the perfect distribution for a Windows user trying to make the switch to Linux.

Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

You no longer have to be an uber-geek to run a Linux server. With the release of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, Novell has at last put out a product that's as easy to install, administer and use as a Windows server--in some cases, even easier.

What's New In Firefox 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

It's a new day for Mozilla. Only a few days after OneStat reported that its Firefox Web browser has reached nearly 13% market share worldwide, the open-source software development organization this morning released Beta 1 of Firefox 2.0. With this release, Firefox devotees will be widely testing the next version of the browser.

Kubuntu 6.06 on Athlon 64

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I recently had a chance to install the latest Kubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) on a desktop computer with a 64-bit Athlon processor. In the article I’ll try to cover the issues I had with this configuration as well as the reasons I have chosen Kubuntu to do the job.

Ubuntu's weak points

Filed under
Ubuntu

The first thing I'd like to say before I level criticism at Ubuntu is that I adore it and have been running it on my laptop since Hoary beta. It's a fantastic OS and is doing great things. However,...

Pronunciation of Free Software Names

Filed under
Linux

Ever see a free software program or GNU/Linux distribution that you have to guess how to pronounce? Ever hear your friends or fellow LUG members argue over how to properly say "Ubuntu" or "Liferea?" Perhaps even GNU/Linux itself (guh-NOO LIN-ucks) gives you pronunciation nightmares.

It's Official: Firefox 2 Beta 1 Released

Firefox 2 Beta 1 is a developer preview release of our next generation Firefox browser and it is being made available for testing purposes only. Firefox 2 Beta 1 is intended for web application developers and our testing community.

Xandros 4: relief for Windows 98/ME orphans

Filed under
Linux

Microsoft has ended all support for Windows 98, 98SE, and ME. And, when they say ending all support, they mean ending all support. This also includes security updates. So, you can either start hauling your older systems to the junk yard after today's last Microsoft patch day, or you can upgrade to Xandros 4.

Emulex Open Source HBA Drivers To Be Part Of New SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 Platform

Filed under
SUSE

Emulex Corporation announced that its LightPulse family of HBAs and drivers are supported as part of the new SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 platform from Novell.

OpenDocument Format Okay for Use by Free Software Use Law Center

Filed under
OSS

The Software Freedom Law Center has released an opinion assuring developers that they can legally implement OpenDocument Format (ODF) in free and open source software. OpenDocument Format is a free file format for saving and exchanging editable documents, spreadsheets, databases and presentations.

Debconf 2007 venue decided

Filed under
Linux

After two very competant and thorough bids have been submitted and evaluated it was decided yesterday that the venue for the 2007 Debconf will be Edinburgh, Scotland.

Skype sound tips

Filed under
HowTos

Skype 1.3 is able to use ALSA natively. How to make it use it, on a "conservative" system which was using ESD and OSS only? (That was the case with a Debian Sarge installation.)

PCLOS logo contest enters 2nd phase

Filed under
PCLOS

The top 13 logos have been posted to the final folder. 2 wildcards are slated to be chosen by Thursday this week and that voting will kick off on Friday or Saturday.

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More in Tux Machines

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

Like its cousin, the Debian based version, Netrunner Rolling also ships a dark Look and Feel theme including the Kvantum theme engine. Using the Kvantum Theme engine plus the Alpha-Black Plasma Theme allowed us to create a more 3D-looking design. Moving the mouse into the lower right corner now visibly activates the “Minimize all Windows to show Desktop” function by a light glow. For those who prefer the classic look, going back to the well-known LNF is a three-button click and explained under “Tips” in our current Readme Section. Read more Also: Debian-Based Netrunner Linux Gets April 2019 Release with New Look and Feel

Android Leftovers

Server: Cloudwashing by SUSE and Openwashing by Red Hat

  • Why Hybrid Cloud is About to Get a Whole Lot Easier
    It seems like analysts, vendors and IT decision makers have been talking about “hybrid cloud” for the longest time. The concept has been around for at least a decade – and that’s a really long time in the IT industry. Is it still important? Absolutely. Almost every piece of cloud market research I read shows the majority of enterprises are focusing on a hybrid cloud strategy. Why? Because they all need increased agility, innovation and productivity, better cost optimization and improved customer experience.
  • The Open Organization guide to Red Hat Summit 2019 [Ed: The 'Open Organization' slant in Red Hat Summit 2019 with Microsoft CEO as keynote because it's all about money, not "open" or "free" (just proprietary and expensive]
    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst published The Open Organization in 2015, he didn't just release a book. He catalyzed a global conversation about the ways open principles are reshaping organizational culture and design.
  • Developing distributed applications and services for tomorrow: a proof of concept
    Innovation is accelerating across the automobile industry, bringing advances in the in-vehicle experience. Connected vehicle technologies are opening up new business models and providing a whole range of new software and data-driven services. When it comes to new software and data-driven services, the possibilities are immense. But there is one trend many use cases have in common: they are becoming more distributed. To provide a great user experience, connected in-vehicle services often need to integrate increasingly diverse data.

Security: Updates, One Year With Spectre, Purism Librem Key and Lanner’s 'Security Appliances' With Back-Doored Chips

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • A year with Spectre: a V8 perspective
    On January 3, 2018, Google Project Zero and others disclosed the first three of a new class of vulnerabilities that affect CPUs that perform speculative execution, dubbed Spectre and Meltdown. Using the speculative execution mechanisms of CPUs, an attacker could temporarily bypass both implicit and explicit safety checks in code that prevent programs from reading unauthorized data in memory. While processor speculation was designed to be a microarchitectural detail, invisible at the architectural level, carefully crafted programs could read unauthorized information in speculation and disclose it through side channels such as the execution time of a program fragment. When it was shown that JavaScript could be used to mount Spectre attacks, the V8 team became involved in tackling the problem. We formed an emergency response team and worked closely with other teams at Google, our partners at other browser vendors, and our hardware partners. In concert with them, we proactively engaged in both offensive research (constructing proof-of-concept gadgets) and defensive research (mitigations for potential attacks).
  • The Purism Librem Key
    The Librem Key is a new hardware token for improving Linux security by adding a physical authentication factor to booting, login and disk decryption on supported systems. It also has some features that make it a good general-purpose OpenPGP smart card. This article looks at how the Librem Key stacks up against other multi-factor tokens like the YubiKey 5 and also considers what makes the Librem Key a unique trusted-computing tool. Purism is a new player in the security key and multi-factor authentication markets. With the introduction of the Librem Key, Purism joins the ranks of other players—such as Yubico, Google, RSA and so on—in providing hardware tokens for multi-factor authentication. In addition, like the YubiKey 5 series, the Librem Key also provides OpenPGP support with cryptographic functions that take place securely on-key. This allows users to generate and use GnuPG public and private keys without exposing any secret key material to the host computer where the USB device is attached. The Librem Key is based on the German-manufactured Nitrokey Pro 2, but it has been modified to focus on "trusted boot" when used with Purism's Linux laptops. (I take a closer look at what the trusted boot process is and how the Librem Key fits into that process, later in this article.)
  • Atom-based network security appliances focus on industrial control
    Lanner’s Apollo Lake based “LEC-6041” and Bay Trail “LEC-6032” are Linux-supported network security appliances for industrial control monitoring with up to 7x GbE ports, including SFP ports, plus magnetic isolation and extended temp support.