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Tuesday, 25 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Tiny drives set for space boost

Filed under
Hardware

Hard drives for mobiles and other portable gadgets could store up to a terabyte of data in the next few years, using a century-old recording process. Hitachi has said it can fit 230 gigabits of data per square inch on a disk using "perpendicular recording". Perpendicular recording was pioneered by the late 19th century work of Danish scientist Valdemar Poulsen, who demonstrated magnetic recording with his telegraphone.

Quake IV for QuakeCon 10th anniversary

Filed under
Gaming

For years, the fragging faithful have gathered for what has become Valhalla for worshippers of first-person shooters. The event is known as QuakeCon, and as the gathering of gamers turns 10 this year, Hollenshead states, "We'll have Quake IV multiplayer to play."

Performance Sneak Preview: Intel Dual Core Pentium

Filed under
Hardware

We recently returned from a road trip to discover a very large box waiting for us. In the package was an Intel reference white box system. The system included a motherboard built around the Intel 955X chipset and a 3.2GHz Pentium 4 Extreme Edition model 840. This particular version of the Pentium 4 contains two full processor cores, built around the Prescott architecture. So we rolled up our sleeves, cleared the lab bench off, and began installing benchmarks.

Cyber-Terrorism Analyst Warns Against Complacency

Filed under
Security

Florida-Cyber-security and counterterrorism analyst Roger Cressey on Monday pleaded with IT executives not to underestimate the threat of "national cyber-event" targeting critical infrastructure in the United States.

Google feature incorporates satellite maps

Filed under
Web
Sci/Tech

Online search engine leader Google has unveiled a new feature that will enable its users to zoom in on homes and businesses using satellite images, an advance that may raise privacy concerns as well as intensify the competitive pressures on its rivals.

the world's only blue rose

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Australian and Japanese researchers have demonstrated the application of RNAi technology for gene replacement in plants, developing the world's only blue rose.

Breeders have attempted to make true blue roses over many years, but none have successfully bred roses with blue pigment. In its first commercial application in plants, the CSIRO-developed RNAi technology was used to remove the gene encoding the enzyme dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) in roses.

'Perpendicular recording' to boost hard drive capacity

Filed under
Hardware

The next generation of personal computers and portable music players could hold 10 times more information than current models, thanks to a different way of writing magnetic data to a hard disc.

How IBM misjudged the PC revolution

Filed under
Misc

Computer giant IBM has been through many changes. Thirty years ago, the US company dominated the information technology market. Now the landscape is very different, with competitors such as Hewlett-Packard and Dell taking it on on equal terms.

But things could have been very different for the company often referred to as 'Big Blue'.

Linux Kernel Denial of Service Vulnerability

Filed under
Linux
Security

Daniel McNeil has reported a vulnerability in the Linux Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Linux vs. Linux: The Battle for the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Many Linux advocates claim that Linux is now ready for primetime, stating that even the novice users can get around in Linux without too many headaches. The good news is that Linux seems to have reached a point where it can begin to compete with Microsoft Windows, to an extent. The open-source operating system offers a variety of free software that is equal to and possibly superior to some professional level software for the Windows platform.

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

Sin City Making Big Bucks and Big News

Filed under
Movies

Released April 1, seems Sin City is on the tips of movie goers' and tech heads' tongues everywhere these days. Noted for using mostly cgi on AMD64 machines for it's action scenes, movies goers and comic fans just love the realistic blood and gore entreated.

Samba, Soccer and Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Since the election of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazil has gradually become a beachhead for Open Source, and consequently a thorn in Microsoft's side. Amazed by Open Source potential, it could completely undermine Microsoft's monopoly, and it probably will.

Seven Deadly IT Mistakes

Filed under
Misc

Handling change is where many software horror stories emerge. Effective design and testing of processes is essential. Using the latest business process management tools makes this even easier because it allows the business process to be viewed and changes to be managed with confidence.

Spring Forward

Filed under
Misc

For those of us in the States, remember to set your clocks ahead an hour at 2:am or before you go to bed.

Pope's influence includes technology firsts

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Misc

While Pope John Paul II will largely be remembered for his influence on social issues ranging from euthanasia to AIDS, he also earned a place in history as the first pontiff to embrace computer technology.

Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican

Filed under
Obits

Pope John Paul II, the third longest-serving pontiff in history, has died at the age of 84.

Always-Connected, Tech Savvy -- and Happy?

Filed under
Misc

You see them everywhere. You might even be one: mobile warriors with a BlackBerry, pager and cell phone arranged in matching holsters around their waists. They're hip, happening, connected and more likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs.

Software agents give out Advice

Filed under
Software

Governments and big business like to indulge in media spin, and that means knowing what is being said about them. But finding out is becoming ever more difficult, with thousands of news outlets, websites and blogs to monitor.

Now a British company is about to launch a software program that can automatically gauge the tone of any electronic document.

CMS gives the public access to hospital care data

Filed under
Web

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services yesterday launched a Web site that lets the public compare hospitals based on their quality of care in treating certain medical conditions.

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More in Tux Machines

Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust
    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.
  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux
    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs. The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.
  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing
    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available. For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • Editor's Corner—Open source is not 'one size fits all' [Ed: But that's a plus, not a minus. With proprietary software it's one unsuitable thing for everything; doesn't scale.]
    Open source communities are no doubt playing a key role in moving the telecommunications industry forward, but not everyone is on board the bandwagon. Over the past five months or so, we've spent a fair amount of time writing about open source groups and standards development organizations (SDOs) such as the Linux Foundation, MEF, Open Networking Foundation, OpenDaylight, the TM Forum and ETSI, and there's clearly more cooperation afoot for the good of the industry. But artificial intelligence startup B.Yond's chief marketing officer, Rikard Kjellberg, said his company has to be careful when it comes to choosing which open source community to commit its resources to. Kjellberg spoke to FierceTelecom on the heels of the AT&T Spark conference earlier this month.
  • Collabora Had Another Stellar Year For Open-Source Consulting
    The Collabora open-source consulting firm whose expertise spans from the Linux kernel to LibreOffice and X.Org had another successful year. The UK-based company last week reported their 2017 financial position last week providing a glimpse at the viability of open-source / free software consulting.
  • Daniel Stenberg: The Polhem prize, one year later
    Family and friends have gotten a rudimentary level of understanding of what curl is and what it does. I'm not suggesting they fully grasp it or know what an "internet protocol" is now, but at least a lot of people understand that it works with "internet transfers". It's not like people were totally uninterested before, but when I was given this prize - by a jury of engineers no less - that says this is a significant invention and accomplishment with a value that "can not be overestimated", it made them more interested. The little video that was produced helped:
  • Open Source Voice Assistant, Mycroft AI, Named Top Deal By KingsCrowd
  • Service providers increasingly adopt open source for their networks
    Communications service providers (CSPs) are increasingly keen to adopt open source technologies to deliver their services, according to research. At this week’s Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam, delegates heard that DevOps, automation, cloud, big data and analytics, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) were increasingly being supported by open source solutions. Commissioned research questioned 150 CSP representatives across 98 companies worldwide. It found that 98% of CSPs are “confident” that open networking solutions can achieve the same level of performance as traditional networking solutions.
  • Communications Service Providers Overwhelmingly Confident in Open Source Networking Solutions, Survey Finds
  • WLinux Distro for Windows Subsystem for Linux Now Available, openSUSE Call for Hosts, New Firefox Bug, Firefox Collecting Telemetry Data and Creative Commons Releases Significant CC Search Update
    In other Firefox news, the browser evidently is collecting telemetry data via hidden add-ons, ITWire reports. The ITWire post also quotes Mozilla's Marshall Eriwn, director of Trust and Security: "...we will measure Telemetry Coverage, which is the percentage of all Firefox users who report telemetry. The Telemetry Coverage measurement will sample a portion of all Firefox clients and report whether telemetry is enabled. This measurement will not include a client identifier and will not be associated with our standard telemetry."
  • This “Netflix For Open Source” Startup Helps Programmers Get Paid
    Open source developers, especially those who work on lesser known projects, do not get much attention or money for the work they do. While some developers are paid to work on open source projects as a part of their day jobs, they can get overwhelmed by the amount of work these projects require.
  • Portable Computing Language 1.2 Released For OpenCL On CPUs & More
    The Portable Computing Language (a.k.a. POCL or PortableCL) is the effort for getting OpenCL running on CPUs as well as other hardware for this open-source code-base that supports OpenCL 1.2 with some OpenCL 2.0+ functionality. The main "feature" of POCL 1.2 is support for LLVM Clang 7.0 as previously the support was limited to LLVM 6.0, but now this new version of LLVM is supported. The HWLOC 2.0 library is also now supported. There are also some minor feature additions like device-side printf being supported.
  • Robert O'Callahan: More Realistic Goals For C++ Lifetimes 1.0
    Over two years ago I wrote about the C++ Lifetimes proposal and some of my concerns about it. Just recently, version 1.0 was released with a blog post by Herb Sutter. Comparing the two versions shows many important changes. The new version is much clearer and more worked-out, but there are also significant material changes. In particular the goal has changed dramatically.

Money and Press for FOSS FUD firms