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Sunday, 18 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Unapproved GM corn found in US food chain

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A Swiss company accidentally sold unapproved genetically modified seed corn in the US for four years. The mistake resulted in about 133 million kilograms of the corn making its way into the food chain.

Personal data of 59,000 people stolen

Filed under
Security

Hackers gained personal information of 59,000 people affiliated with a California university - the latest in a string of high-profile cases of identity theft.

This Week's Movies, part 2: The Ring Two

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

The Ring Two may have had one of the biggest premier weekends in recent history, grossing over $35 million, but I'd bet that'll be the bulk of it. After word gets around what a stinker this movie was waiting lines should be much shorter.

Texas sues Vonage over emergency service

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Legal

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Vonage Holdings, accusing the fast-growing VoIP provider of not warning customers about limits to its 911 emergency dialing service.

Joyce John tried to dial 911 from a VoIP phone in her home as burglars broke into the house and shot and wounded her parents. John's call to 911 connected to a recording saying she would have to dial 911 from a different phone.

Matrix Online (finally) jacks in

Filed under
Gaming

Following months of delays and a publisher switch, Sega and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment launch the sci-fi film trilogy-inspired MMORPG.

Holy Cow - A 4000!!!

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

The guru of 3D has a review of the AMD 4000+. It's a big ole 11 page article chocked full of benchmarks and diagrams, but let's cut to the chase: The Verdict!

E3 Expo is a sellout

Filed under
Software

No room at the inn as upcoming trade show reaches peak capacity in record time--400 exhibitors gobble up every square inch of the LA Convention Center.

When is selling out a good thing? When it is E3 Expo.

Linux lags Windows in new security report

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

A M$ funded report released today indicates Windows Server 2003 may actually be more secure than its most popular Linux competitors.

It isn't like it was 'co-funded' by both Microsoft and Red Hat," said Michael D. "Mick" Bauer, senior editor of Linux Journal.

Linux firms not impressed with Microsoft's customer win

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft's latest customer win has failed to impress members of the open source community, who insist that it doesn't prove that Windows is superior to Linux.

Richard Carlson, the head of business systems at RICS, admitted that the company did not do a comparative study of Linux and Windows.

eBayer seeks to exorcise voodoo cuddly toy

Filed under
Web

Those readers who feel that their lives are lacking a little excitement may well be interested in snapping up a possessed Stitch teddy bear which has terrorised a Canadian family to the point that they are now compelled to take the only course of action left to them - offload the voodoo devil cuddly toy on eBay before it decapitates the entire clan in an blood-splattered slashfest of mindless, knife-driven violence.

Dot-con job: How InfoSpace took its investors for a ride

Filed under
Web

Five years ago this week, at the height of the dot-com stock frenzy, a young Bellevue company called InfoSpace was worth more than Boeing.

InfoSpace's success was an illusion, created by lies and deception. Built on internal company e-mails, confidential documents filed in court and scores of interviews, Naveen Jain and others created the illusion of revenues with accounting tricks and dubious deals.

Microsoft contract win put down to Linux skills shortage

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft may find a monopoly on developers will help it maintain its grip on the software market in the face of Linux alternatives.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors said that the decision to go with Microsoft was taken very early on before the job was put out to tender - on the basis that RICS' in-house developers were in the main Microsoft coders.

Maybe they should have called these guys.

Dell welcomes back Muslim workers

Filed under
Hardware
Legal

Dell Computer has reached agreement with 31 workers at its Nashville factory who left the firm after a disagreement over evening prayers.

Computers bad for kids

Filed under
Misc

Using a computer at home might actually reduce a child's performance in maths, science and English rather than improve it, a study has found.

Website offers cash for old mobile phones

Filed under
Web

A new UK website has launched, offering cash in exchange for second-hand phones.

Mopay says that if you send off your used phone - Freepost - to them they’ll send you a cheque in exchange. You can get a quote for your old phone online, before you send it in, and a cheque will arrive within an fortnight.

Intel's 64-Bit Pentium 4s Hit The Streets

Filed under
Hardware

Intel's first 64-bit Pentium 4 microprocessors were quietly added to the company's price lists on Sunday, heralding their entrance into the marketplace.

Although, AMD chip retains the speed crown.

Does Your Wi-Fi Hotspot Have an Evil Twin?

Filed under
Security

Identity thieves are going wireless in their quest to steal your personal info.

You may want to think twice before logging into a public wireless hotspot. Sure, grabbing a few minutes of connectivity is convenient, but identity thieves are discovering that, through "evil twin" attacks, hotspots are a great way to steal unsuspecting users' private information. So how does an evil twin attack work?

This Week's Movies: The Jacket and The Pacifier

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

The Pacifier staring Vin Diesel was your basic Disney feel good movie. Formulaic, by-the-numbers plot and cookie cutter script are dressed up by an admirable performance from my favorite action hero and yours, Vin Diesel.

The Jacket was an imaginative pychological mystery with an intriguing plot and engaging dialogue. The actors did a marvelous job of portraying their characters. They made an unbelievable scenario plausible.

Circumventing Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Notwithstanding the fact it will be many years before very many corporate users might be able to work in a "Microsoft-free" environment, there appears to be significant effort being put forth to make it a reality. From the geekiest tech pubs, like the Java Developer's Journal to august ones such as The Wall Street Journal, circumventing Microsoft is a hot topic.

Report finds surge in on-line attacks

Filed under
Security

Internet attacks on businesses and other organizations increased by about 28 per cent in the second half of 2004 compared with the first six months of the year, and hackers are setting their sights on the rapidly emerging mobile-computing market, warns a report on Internet security to be released Monday.

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KDE: This week in Usability & Productivity and KBibTeX's Latest

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 45
    Let’s have a bit more Usability & Productivity, shall we? The KDE Applications 18.12 release is right around the corner, and we got a lot of great improvements to some core KDE apps–some for that upcoming release, and some for the next one. And lots of other things too, of course!
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FreeBSD 12.0-RC1 Released, Fixes Ryzen 2 Temperature Reporting

Arguably most user-facing with this week's FreeBSD 12.0-RC1 release is updating the amdsmn/amdtemp drivers for attaching to Ryzen 2 host bridges. Additionally, the amdtemp driver has been fixed for correctly reporting the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX core temperature. The 2990WX temperature reporting is the same fix Linux initially needed to for a 27 degree offset to report the correct temperature. It's just taken FreeBSD longer to add Ryzen 2 / Threadripper 2 temperature bits even though they had beat the Linux kernel crew with the initial Zen CPU temperature reporting last year. Read more Also: MeetBSD 2018: Michael W Lucas Why BSD?

GPU/Graphics: DRM/KMS and CUDA

  • Google's Pixel 3 Is Using The MSM DRM Driver, More Android Phones Moving To DRM/KMS Code
    It turns out Google's recently announced Pixel 3 smartphone is making use of the MSM Direct Rendering Manager driver associated with the Freedreno open-source Qualcomm graphics project. Google is also getting more Android vendors moving over to using DRM/KMS drivers to power their graphics/display. Alistair Strachan of Google presented at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference and the growing adoption of Direct Rendering Manager / Kernel Mode-Setting drivers by Android devices.
  • Red Hat Developers Working Towards A Vendor-Neutral Compute Stack To Take On NVIDIA's CUDA
    At this week's Linux Plumbers Conference, David Airlie began talking about the possibility of a vendor-neutral compute stack across Intel, Radeon, and NVIDIA GPU platforms that could potentially take on NVIDIA's CUDA dominance. There has been the work on open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) SPIR-V compute support all year and that's ongoing with not yet having reached mainline Mesa. That effort has been largely worked on by Karol Herbst and Rob Clark, both open-source GPU driver developers at Red Hat. There has also been other compute-motivated open-source driver/infrastructure work out of Red Hat like Jerome Glisse's ongoing kernel work around Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM). There's also been the Radeon RADV driver that Red Hat's David Airlie co-founded and continues contributing significantly to its advancement. And then there has been other graphics/compute contributions too with Red Hat remaining one of the largest upstream contributors to the ecosystem.

Endless OS Switching To The BFQ I/O Scheduler For More Responsive Linux Desktop

While Con Kolivas' kernel patch series decided to do away with BFQ support, the GNOME-aligned Endless OS Linux distribution has decided to do the opposite in move from CFQ as the default I/O scheduler over to BFQ. Endless OS has decided to switch to the BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) I/O scheduler since it prioritizes interactive workloads and should make for a better experience for its users particularly when applications may be upgrading in the background. During heavy background I/O, Endless found that their launch time of LibreOffice went from taking 16 seconds with CFQ to just three seconds when using BFQ. Other tests were also positive for improving the interactivity/responsiveness of the system particularly during heavy background I/O. Read more