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Thursday, 19 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 182

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Distributions in 2006

  • News: Fedora revamps RPM, KNOPPIX 5.1, Debian release update, Arch Linux Office Install CD, Dreamlinux interview
  • Released last week: SabayonLinux 3.2 "miniEdition", VectorLinux 5.8
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2007, K12LTSP Linux 6.0
  • New distributions: Kuliax
  • Reader comments

Read more in this year's final issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Review: Thunderbird 2.0 Beta 1 Adds New Look And Feel

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla, the developer of the free Thunderbird e-mail client, has taken a good program and made it better with the release of the version 2.0 beta 1. It is rare that a beta release is not buggy, clunky, and generally a mess -- especially when, as word has it, the developers are changing the code base -- but I was pleasantly surprised by its stability and the dearth of issues.

HOWTO compile SuperTux 0.3.0 (Milestone 1.9) on Ubuntu Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

SuperTux 0.3.0 has been out for hours now. What are you waiting for? Debian (unstable) and Ubuntu (Dapper or Edgy) users:

Linux Security: A Big Edge Over Windows

Filed under
Linux

Linux is better at locking down a computer than Windows. The Linux OS uses configuration settings and user permissions to a much more efficient degree than the Windows administrator account.

Open Source Investment Rose 131% in 2006

Filed under
OSS

The amount of venture capital funding invested in the Linux and open source-related vendors tracked by Computer Business Review rose 131% in 2006, vastly outpacing the IT market as a whole.

Ghost in the machine

Brent Northcutt is something of a ghost in the machine. As a system programmer for I-Land, the 32-year-old Warrensburg resident works his magic in languages with names such as PHP, Perl, and C++. A dedicated adherent to what is known in the virtual realm as the open source movement, Mr. Northcutt is most at home in the Unix-based Linux operating system.

Linux and its closing window of opportunity with OEMs

Filed under
Linux

I am planning on changing the world with this article. I can’t do it on my own: I need your help. Despite what people say, Linux does not have a significant slice just yet. By “significant slice”, here I mean 20% to 30%. We are nowhere near it, in fact.

Review: Stratus ftServer 4300

Filed under
Reviews

Lots of companies sell Linux servers, but how many promise 99.999% uptime? Not very many, but Stratus Technologies sells systems that offer the kind of fault tolerance that will handle mission-critical applications and leave admins with peace of mind. I had a chance to test out one of the company's ftServer 4300 systems, and it's an impressive system.

Pulling a story about the company’s name out of Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Ever wonder why Linux company Red Hat is called that? In an interview with Red Hat Magazine, co-founder BobYoung said that the red hat has long been a symbol of freedom, with revolutionaries in both America and France donning red caps during their uprisings.

Howtos and Tips, & tricks

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Mplayer in Ubuntu

  • Compiling RPM From Source RPMs
  • Install and Configure Apache2 with PHP5 and SSL Support in Debian Etch
  • Basics for the command line - for newbies

Opera 9.10 Released

Filed under
Software

Opera 9.10 has been officially released this morning. Having appeared on mirrors several days ago, this release was announced just this morning. This update brings some important bug fixes such as no more crashes with Flash 9, smooth scrolling fixed, and fixes to the Fraud Protection feature.

Also: Install Opera Web Browser in Ubuntu

Various ways of detecting rootkits in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Consider this scenario... Your machine running GNU/Linux has been penetrated by a hacker without your knowledge and he has swapped the passwd program which you use to change the user password with one of his own. His passwd program has the same name as the real passwd program and works flawlessly in all respects except for the fact that it will also gather data residing on your machine such as the user details each time it is run and transmit it to a remote location or it will open a back door for outsiders by providing easy root access and all the time, you will be impervious about its actions. This is an example of your machine getting rooted.

2006 Year in Review: Hits and Misses

Filed under
Misc

It was a year full of transitions and surprises, and the next year looks likely to bring more of the same. Here's a look at some of eWEEK's most interesting stories from 2006.

Who needs the command line? (Well, actually, we all do)

Filed under
Linux

As you might have guessed this is going to be a brazen and shameless plug for the command line. I write it to throw in my tuppence-worth after my own Linux experiences. I am also concerned about a new generation of users coming to GNU/Linux without a proper understanding of the underlying reasons for its superiority over Windows but this not a blow by blow comparison.

Game of the Day: Snakebite

Filed under
Gaming

Meet Snakebite. Now, you may not have heard of this "Snakebite" game for Linux. That's because it isn't a stand-alone game. Instead, it's a set of custom levels made for the classic game "Rocks n Diamonds". But, as you see from the screenshots, this is nothing like our old friend from Artsoft:

Growth of Linux

Filed under
Linux

A few years ago, the odds of switching on a personal computer and seeing Windows 95 boot were staggering. Linux was a whisper on the wind back in those days, as the skill level required to successfully administer it (not to mention installing!) in vanishingly short supply.

Enable WPA Wireless access point in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

I have a Toshiba laptop at home, I was running “Edgy Eft” (Ubuntu Linux 6.10) But one of the important things about it was its inability to connect to WPA-encrypted Wifi access points. I am giving the procedure that worked for me to enable wpa in my toshiba laptop.

Also: Share your Ubuntu Desktop Using Remote Desktop

Software installation on Linux: Today, it sucks

Filed under
Linux

Unless an application is included with your Linux distribution of choice, installing that application on Linux is a nightmare compared to Windows. Here’s an example. To install Sun’s Java Studio Creator on Windows, I just click on the .exe. In contrast, on Linux, I click on the .bin, which downloads the file and.. up pops a text editor showing me a /bin/sh script.

The Perfect Setup - OpenSuSE 10.2 (32-bit)

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up an OpenSuSE 10.2 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.).

Novell Sends Coded Message to Red Hat

Filed under
SUSE

The company quoted DistroWatch.com as counting second-place openSUSE getting more hits in the last 30 days, narrowing Ubuntu's first-place lead and widening the gap between SUSE and third-place Fedora. OpenSUSE reportedly has 30,000 registered members.

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    Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work's many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet. Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few 'thank you' emails per month. I'm very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

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