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Monday, 24 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linus On The Extensible Firmware Interface

Filed under
Linux

A recent patch posted to the lkml contained the following description, "this patch adds an efi e820 memory mapping", in response to which Andrew Morton asked, "why?". Linus Torvalds offered his views on EFI.

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Ubuntu Linux 6.06 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

You know a Linux distribution is becoming popular when it’s mentioned at the Fox News website, and there it was in a June 20 headline, ‘Ubuntu 6.06 Is Current Desktop-Linux Champ’. Of course, the story was courtesy eweek.com, but the fact that Fox cared is significant.

Open Source In Silicon Valley, alternative computing is easy

Filed under
OSS

A LOT OF tech types talk a good game about the high falutin' democratic principles of open source code, but it's what they do behind closed doors that really counts. And it's there that many well-meaning users balk at a commitment to what has traditionally been seen as an admirable but intimidating personal-computing path. But with all the community support at hand in Silicon Valley, there's little to fear from Linux anymore.

Coldwar Goes Gold

Filed under
Gaming

The developers of Linux Game Publishing (LGP) recently finished with the final version of Coldwar.

Kubuntu 6.06 LTS - An excellent Linux distribution based on KDE

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

By the time I received the Kubuntu CD, I was very excited and raring to check out what Kubuntu had in store for the Linux users. I found that there is a great level of overlap between Kubuntu and Ubuntu in that the way it boots up is the same for both the distributions.

Digium Integrates rPath’s rBuilder Solution

Filed under
Linux

rPath, provider of the first platform for creating and maintaining Linux software appliances, today announced that Digium® Inc., original creator of Asterisk™ and pioneer of open source telephony is an rBuilder and rPath Linux partner.

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Secure Debian System Using FireHOL Firewall

Filed under
Linux

FireHOL is a stateful iptables packet filtering firewall configurator. It is abstracted, extensible, easy and powerful. It can handle any kind of firewall, but most importantly, it gives you the means to configure it, the same way you think of it.

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Released GoblinX Mini 1.4.0

Filed under
Linux

The GoblinX Mini 1.4.0 is released with several important improvments.

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 was delayed for several weeks to ensure that it was as good as it could be, then finally released on June 1. This version of Ubuntu was supposed to be "enterprise-ready" as a server and as a desktop, but unless businesses like dealing with multiple hardware issues, a substandard Java environment, and a lack of proprietary Web browser plugins, I can't see how Ubuntu Linux 6.06 is ready for anything except perhaps a patch release.

Emacs tips: Checking spelling and syntax

Filed under
HowTos

Even the Emacs-enlightened are still but humble human beings who may err. We make spelling mistakes in our writing, and syntactical mistakes in our structured documents. So let's take a tour through Emacs' built-in tools for preventing, catching, and correcting mistakes.

Make Dapper Drake Perform on Old Hardware

Filed under
Ubuntu

As a longtime fan of SuSE Linux, I somehow managed to miss the Ubuntu bandwagon. Now I know what I was missing. I recently replaced SuSE 10.1 with Ubuntu 6.06, also known as Dapper Drake, on my main PC in a matter of minutes, and am now enjoying a clean, feature-rich computing environment that is easy to configure and just works.

Illarion is available for Linux now

Filed under
Gaming

Illarion is a free, completely self developed graphical fantasy game that focuses on true roleplaying. We are offering our own server, a Java client (which can be used at Linux or Windows) and the guarantee that you will never ever pay anything for this game.

Will Linux Rule The Digital Home?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

For consumer electronics industry, digital home is the next big pot of gold, a pot so big that it has everyone from Apple (AAPL) to Microsoft (MSFT) to Intel (INTC) licking their chops. But it is Linux could emerge as one of the biggest winners in this bonanza.

System Administration: Another Step toward the BIND - IV

Filed under
HowTos

In this session we're going to look at a zone file listed in our named.conf file.

Why I ditched my Mac for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Based on the title of this treatise of mine you are, likely, safe in your assumption that I am about to tell you all, using the bestest words my mind can muster, why I stopped using MacOS X and switched over to Linux. The distro I settled on at this point is Ubuntu.

ClarkConnect - Enterprise Linux for Your Home

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Ever wonder how you could get a solid Security Enhanced Enterprise Grade Linux Router/Server with ftp, apache, traffic shaping, pop-up blocker, content filter, intrusion detection/prevention, and other nice handy tools that every robust server should have...and here's the kicker...installed and running in about 30 minutes in your home?

The Five Coding Styles and Linux

Filed under
Software

A long time ago, there was a simple debate on what kind of indenting should you be using and where should you place curly braces: it was the dispute "ANSI vs. K&R". Recently though, I noticed that 4 years ago, Greg Kroah-Hartman forced the use of the Linux (Linus) coding standards in the kernel! Let's see however what are the five existing coding styles.

growing ext3 partition on RAID1 without rebooting

Filed under
HowTos

Although rather straightforward, I couldn't find an easy step-by-step guide, so here I'll describe how I ended up growing my ext3 partion on a RAID-1 array.

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More in Tux Machines

Official x86 Zhaoxin Processor Support Is Coming With Linux 5.3

Zhaoxin is the company producing Chinese x86 CPUs created by a joint venture between VIA and the Shanghai government. The current Zhaoxin ZX CPUs are based on VIA's Isaiah design and making use of VIA's x86 license. With the Linux 5.3 kernel will be better support for these Chinese desktop x86 CPUs. Future designs of the Zhaoxin processors call for 7nm manufacturing, PCI Express 4.0, DDR5, and other features to put it on parity with modern Intel and AMD CPUs. It remains to be seen how well that will work out, but certainly seems to be moving along in the desktop/consumer space for Chinese-built x86 CPUs while in the server space there's the Hygon Dhyana EPYC-based processors filling the space for Chinese servers. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • OpenSSH adds protection against Spectre, Meltdown, RAMBleed

    OpenSSH, a widely used suite of programs for secure (SSH protocol-based) remote login, has been equipped with protection against side-channel attacks that could allow attackers to extract private keys from memory.

  • How to take the pain out of patching Linux and Windows systems at scale

    Patching can be manually intensive and time-consuming, requiring large amounts of coordination and processes. Tony Green gives the best tips.

  • Removal of IBRS mitigation for Spectre Variant2

    As the Meltdown and Spectre attacks were published begin of January 2018, several mitigations were planned and implemented for Spectre Variant 2.

  • Go and FIPS 140-2 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    Red Hat provides the Go programming language to Red Hat Enterprise Linux customers via the go-toolset package. If this package is new to you, and you want to learn more, check out some of the previous articles that have been written for some background. The go-toolset package is currently shipping Go version 1.11.x, with Red Hat planning to ship 1.12.x in Fall 2019. Currently, the go-toolset package only provides the Go toolchain (e.g., the compiler and associated tools like gofmt); however, we are looking into adding other tools to provide a more complete and full-featured Go development environment. In this article, I will talk about some of the improvements, changes, and exciting new features for go-toolset that we have been working on. These changes bring many upstream improvements and CVE fixes, as well as new features that we have been developing internally alongside upstream.

  • Check your password security with Have I Been Pwned? and pass

    Password security involves a broad set of practices, and not all of them are appropriate or possible for everyone. Therefore, the best strategy is to develop a threat model by thinking through your most significant risks—who and what you are protecting against—then model your security approach on the activities that are most effective against those specific threats. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has a great series on threat modeling that I encourage everyone to read. In my threat model, I am very concerned about the security of my passwords against (among other things) dictionary attacks, in which an attacker uses a list of likely or known passwords to try to break into a system. One way to stop dictionary attacks is to have your service provider rate-limit or deny login attempts after a certain number of failures. Another way is not to use passwords in the "known passwords" dataset.

SUSE: Release of SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Enterprise Storage, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 and More

  • SUSE CaaS Platform 4.0 Beta 3 is out!

    SUSE CaaS Platform 4.0 is built on top of SLE 15 SP1 and requires either the JeOS version shipped from the product repositories or a regular SLE 15 SP1 installation. Please note that SLE 15 SP1 is now officially out! Check out the official announcement for more information. Thus you should not use a SLES 15 SP1 environment with the SLE Beta Registration Code anymore. Because the SLE Beta Registration Code has expired now, but you can either use your regular SLE Registration Code or use a Trial.

  • SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Now Available

    With the current increase in data creation, increased costs and flat to lower budgets, IT organizations are looking for ways to deploy highly scalable and resilient storage solutions that manage data growth and complexity, reduce costs and seamlessly adapt to changing demands. Today we are pleased to announce the general availability of SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, the latest release of the award-winning SUSE software-defined storage solution designed to meet the demands of the data explosion.

  • What’s New for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15 SP1

    Happy Birthday! It’s been 1 year since we introduced the world’s first multimodal OS supporting 64-bit Arm systems (AArch64 architecture), SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm 15. Enterprise early adopters and developers of Ceph-based storage and industrial automation systems can gain faster time to market for innovative Arm-based server and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm is tested with a broad set of Arm System-on-a-Chip (SoC) processors, enabling enterprise-class security and greater reliability. And with your choice of Standard or Premium Support subscriptions you can get the latest security patches and fixes, and spend less time on problem resolution as compared to maintaining your own Linux distribution.

  • Are you ready for the world’s first Multimodal Operating System

    Today, SUSE releases SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1, marking the one-year anniversary since we launched the world’s first multimodal OS. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1 advances the multimodal OS model by enhancing the core tenets of common code base, modularity and community development while hardening business-critical attributes such as data security, reduced downtime and optimized workloads.

  • The future of OpenStack?

    Before we can answer these questions, let’s take a look at its past to give some context. Since its original release in 2010 as a joint venture by Rackspace and NASA, and its subsequent spin-off into a separate open source foundation in 2012, OpenStack has seen growth and hype that was almost unparalleled. I was fortunate enough to attend the Paris OpenStack Summit in 2014, where Mark Collier was famously driven onto stage for a keynote in one of the BMW electric sports cars. The event was huge and was packed with attendees and sponsors – almost every large technology company you can think of was there. Marketing budget had clearly been splurged in a big way on this event with lots of pizazz and fancy swag to be had from the various vendor booths. Cycle forward 4 years to the next OpenStack Summit I attended – Vancouver in May 2018. This was a very different affair – most of the tech behemoths were no longer sponsoring, and while there were some nice pieces of swag for attendees to take home, it was clear that marketing budgets had been reduced as the hype had decreased. There were less attendees, less expensive giveaways, but that ever-present buzz of open source collaboration that has always been a part of OpenStack was still there. Users were still sharing their stories, and developers and engineers were sharing their learnings with each other, just on a slightly smaller scale.

  • SUSE Academic Program to be present at 2019 UCISA SSG Conference

    Engaging with the community has always been important for SUSE and this is no different for our Academic Program. That is why next week, the SUSE Academic Program is excited to attend and participate in a three day event hosted by one of the most respected networks in UK education.

Glen Barber: Statement regarding employment change and roles in the [FreeBSD] Project

Dear FreeBSD community:

As I have a highly-visible role within the community, I want to share
some news.  I have decided the time has come to move on from my role
with the FreeBSD Foundation, this Friday being my last day.  I have
accepted a position within a prominent company that uses and produces
products based on FreeBSD.

My new employer has included provisions within my job description that
allow me to continue supporting the FreeBSD Project in my current
roles, including Release Engineering.

There are no planned immediate changes with how this pertains to my
roles within the Project and the various teams of which I am a member.

FreeBSD 11.3 and 12.1 will continue as previously scheduled, with no
impact as a result of this change.

I want to thank everyone at the FreeBSD Foundation for providing the
opportunity to serve the FreeBSD Project in my various roles, and their
support for my decision.

I look forward to continue supporting the FreeBSD Project in my various
roles moving forward.

Glen
Read more Also: FreeBSD's Release Engineering Lead Departs The Foundation