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Wednesday, 26 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Suse 10.1 RC 1 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The beta cycle is history! I'm still sweeping up confetti here. OpenSUSE announced the availability of 10.1 release candidate 1 early this morning. I've actually been downloading the deltas lately and even though they come in fairly slow, it is much nicer downloading 300 mbs rather than 3 gigs. I highly recommend that method. I am in the process of downloading the full x86_64 version as well. It's coming in at a snails pace too, but hopefully I will be able to report on it before rc2 comes out. But back to the topic at hand. How did the release candidate do? Will this phase go as planned or will final have to be delayed? Here is my report.

SpreadKDE: Try KDE

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KDE

Try KDE is a new resource listing ways that you can try out KDE without commiting to a full GNU/Linux or BSD install. It includes links to live cds, VMware player images and Klik bundles as well as links to KDE desktops available over NX, with explanations of these technologies.

Firefox 1.5.0.2 Released

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Moz/FF

The award-winning, free Web browser is better than ever. Browse the Web with confidence - Firefox protects you from viruses, spyware and pop-ups. Enjoy improvements to performance, ease of use and privacy. Today brings version 1.5.0.2, and it is recommended that all Firefox users upgrade to this latest version.

Linux primer for networkers

Filed under
HowTos

Installing, supporting and particularly diagnosing networks can involve much detective work, in addition to decent levels of frustration and caffeine. As with all investigations, the more data that is available to form and test hypotheses, the more likely a problem will be solved. Therefore, the more options or tools available for data gathering, the more useful the data obtained.

Linux powers electronic sheet music reader

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Linux

FreeHand Systems used embedded Linux to build an electronic music reader designed to replace paper-based sheet music in practice, lesson, and performance settings.

Also: TV browser supports Flash 7, Linux devices

Linux Distributions Bird's Eye View - a Mind Map

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Linux

There are umpteen GNU/Linux distributions and then some more. Many claim their roots in Debian and others in Red Hat. Still others swear that they are unique and were created from grounds up. Wouldn't it be nice if we had a picture which gave a broad idea of the roots of each GNU/Linux distributions? Well look no further. Here is a mind map of almost all GNU/Linux distributions.

Process your email with procmail

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HowTos

Mutt is a fine command-line email client, but it lags Evolution and Thunderbird in its ability to do email filtering. The procmail mail processing utility can help. It is highly configurable, allows for far better email filtering than Thunderbird, and as is customary with command-line applications, it is fast. While procmail is most commonly employed on the server side, its ability to handle POP and IMAP protocols makes it useful for desktop users as well.

Gentoo on a 1and1 vserver

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Gentoo
HowTos

The company 1and1 recently started offering virtual servers based on the Virtuozzo virtualization technology. While these machines are quite cheap and provide a full linux work environment they run SUSE by default. Not my favorite linux distribution... I was pretty certain that I could also switch the server to Gentoo. So I tried and it is definitely possible.

Ubuntu: A ramble through Drake Lake

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Ubuntu

This is not a review. It is not fair to review a work in progress. It is not a preview either. Such has already been done. Besides, all too often both views degenerate into a list of everything that does not yet work. And! And! Even reviews of released Linux distributions often do little more than enumerate features that haven't been added yet, but are already present in the author's current favourite. So I won't cover in any great depth what is and is not in Dapper. If you want to mark for yourself each stride forward, please visit the testing pages linked to above. It will tell you what you need to know, and has pretty screen-shots besides.

Novell comments on its transition to Linux desktops

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SUSE

In a CNET story reporter Renai LeMay wrote, "Novell may be evangelizing Linux and Open Office on the desktop, but more than half of its own employees can still boot Microsoft Windows. DesktopLinux.com contacted Novell Director of Global Public Relations Bruce Lowry for Novell's comment on the CNET report.

Will open source ever destroy its proprietary prey? Ask Apache

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OSS

Just as video failed to completely kill off the radio star, I think it's probably premature to finger open source as the murderer of commercial software. Apache Foundation chairman Greg Stein, on the other hand, had no problem giving a five- to 10-year timeline for packaged applications at EclipseCon in March.

Novell and SCO heading for arbitration over Unix claims

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SUSE

Novell Inc has asked the court hearing its slander of title case against SCO Group Inc to put a hold on proceedings while SCO's non-compete agreement and copyright infringement claims against Novell's SUSE Linux are referred to the International Court of Arbitration.

Combining Documents with OOo

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HowTos

I ended it with a suggestion about how to use the tools in OOo to combine documents much more efficiently than you could hope to do with Reveal Codes. What follows is an expanded version of my suggestion that reinforces, yet again, the advantages of using styles in many situations.

New KOffice supports Oasis

Filed under
KDE

Another major advance is the unified scripting solution, Kross. The cross-language support for scripting (hence the name) allows for scripting in both Python and Ruby.

Using epoll() For Asynchronous Network Programming

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HowTos

General way to implement tcp servers is “one thread/process per connection”. But on high loads this approach can be not so efficient and we need to use another patterns of connection handling. In this article I will describe how to implement tcp-server with synchronous connections handling using epoll() system call of Linux 2.6. kernel.

The Free Software Alternative in a Gnutshell

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OSS

If I were to duplicate my Microsoft office computing environment at home, , it would cost me a small fortune. Instead, I have the equivalent functionality at no cost beyond the cost of the computer itself. My home computer uses the free Linux operating system and free application programs.

SUSE Linux 10.1 RC1 Released

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SUSE

I'm glad to announce SUSE Linux 10.1 Codename "Agama Lizard" RC1. We will make sometime next week an RC2 - and only distribute the delta ISOs of any RCs, and update the factory tree as well. Full Announcement.

Triple-booting with GRUB, LILO, and Windows XP

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HowTos

Wondering how to create a triple-booting system that involves Windows and two Linux distributions -- one that uses the GRUB bootloader and the other using LILO? Here's a hands-on procedure that lets you do just that, without tweaking cryptic configuration files and messing with geeky commands.

Configuring static routes in Debian or Red Hat Linux systems

Filed under
HowTos

Static routes improves overall performance of your network (especially bandwidth saving). They are also useful in stub networks (i.e. there is only one link to the network). For example, each LAN (located at different offices) is connecting to HQ IDC (internet data center) using single T1/LL/Wan link.

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More in Tux Machines

AMD Releases Firmware Update To Address SEV Vulnerability

A new security vulnerability has been made public over AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) having insecure cryptographic implementations. Fortunately, this AMD SEV issue is addressed by a firmware update. CVE-2019-9836 has been made pulic as the AMD Secure Processor / Secure Encrypted Virtualization having an insecure cryptographic implementation. Read more

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to get the latest Wine on Linux Mint 19
  • How to Install KDE Plasma in Arch Linux (Guide)
  • 0 bytes left

    Around 2003–2004, a friend and I wrote a softsynth that was used in a 64 kB intro. Now, 14 years later, cTrix and Pselodux picked it up and made a really cool 32 kB tune with it! Who would have thought.

  • A month full of learning with Gnome-GSoC

    In this month I was able to work with Libgit2-glib where Albfan mentored me on how to port functions from Libgit2 to Libgit2-glib. Libgit2-glib now has functionality to compare two-buffers. This feature I think can now benefit other projects also which requires diff from buffers, for example Builder for it’s diff-view and gedit.

  • Google Developers Are Looking At Creating A New libc For LLVM

    As part of Google's consolidating their different toolchains around LLVM, they are exploring the possibility of writing a new C library "libc" implementation.  Google is looking to develop a new C standard library within LLVM that will better suit their use-cases and likely others within the community too. 

  • How We Made Conda Faster in 4.7

    We’ve witnessed a lot of community grumbling about Conda’s speed, and we’ve experienced it ourselves. Thanks to a contract from NASA via the SBIR program, we’ve been able to dedicate a lot of time recently to optimizing Conda.  We’d like to take this opportunity to discuss what we did, and what we think is left to do.

  • TensorFlow CPU optimizations in Anaconda

    By Stan Seibert, Anaconda, Inc. & Nathan Greeneltch, Intel Corporation TensorFlow is one of the most commonly used frameworks for large-scale machine learning, especially deep learning (we’ll call it “DL” for short). This popular framework has been increasingly used to solve a variety of complex research, business and social problems. Since 2016, Intel and Google have worked together to optimize TensorFlow for DL training and inference speed performance on CPUs. The Anaconda Distribution has included this CPU-optimized TensorFlow as the default for the past several TensorFlow releases. Performance optimizations for CPUs are provided by both software-layer graph optimizations and hardware-specific code paths. In particular, the software-layer graph optimizations use the Intel Math Kernel Library for Deep Neural Networks (Intel MKL-DNN), an open source performance library for DL applications on Intel architecture. Hardware specific code paths are further accelerated with advanced x86 processor instruction set, specifically, Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel AVX-512) and new instructions found in the Intel Deep Learning Boost (Intel DL Boost) feature on 2nd generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors. Let’s take a closer look at both optimization approaches and how to get these accelerations from Anaconda.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #374 (June 25, 2019)

VIdeo/Audio: Linux in the Ham Shack, How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 and "Debian Package of the Day"

  • LHS Episode #290: Where the Wild Things Are

    Welcome to Episode 290 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short format show, the hosts discuss the recent ARRL Field Day, LIDs getting theirs, vandalism in Oregon, a Canonical flip-flop, satellite reception with SDR and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • How to install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0

    In this video, I am going to show how to Install OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • Jonathan Carter: PeerTube and LBRY

    I have many problems with YouTube, who doesn’t these days, right? I’m not going to go into all the nitty gritty of it in this post, but here’s a video from a LBRY advocate that does a good job of summarizing some of the issues by using clips from YouTube creators: I have a channel on YouTube for which I have lots of plans for. I started making videos last year and created 59 episodes for Debian Package of the Day. I’m proud that I got so far because I tend to lose interest in things after I figure out how it works or how to do it. I suppose some people have assumed that my video channel is dead because I haven’t uploaded recently, but I’ve just been really busy and in recent weeks, also a bit tired as a result. Things should pick up again soon.

Games: Steam Summer Sale, Last Moon, Ubuntu-Valve-Canonical Faceoff

  • Steam Summer Sale 2019 is live, here’s what to look out for Linux fans

    Another year, another massive sale is now live on Steam. Let’s take a look at what Valve are doing this year and what you should be looking out for. This time around, Valve aren’t doing any special trading cards. They’re trying something a little different! You will be entering the "Steam Grand Prix" by joining a team (go team Hare!), earning points for rewards and having a shot at winning some free games in the process. Sounds like a good bit of fun, the specific-game challenges are a nice touch.

  • Last Moon, a 2D action-RPG with a gorgeous vibrant style will be coming to Linux next year

    Sköll Studio managed to capture my attention recently, with some early footage of their action-RPG 'Last Moon' popping up in my feed and it looks gorgeous. Taking inspiration from classics like Legend of Zelda: A link to the past, Secret of Mana, Chrono Trigger and a ton more you can see it quite clearly. Last Moon takes in place in a once peaceful kingdom, where an ancient and powerful mage put a curse on the moon, as Lunar Knight you need to stop all this insanity and bring back peace.

  • Ubuntu Takes A U-Turn with 32-Bit Support

    Canonical will continue to support legacy applications and libraries. Canonical, the maker of the world’s most popular Linux-based distribution Ubuntu, has revived support for 32-bit libraries after feedback from WINE, Ubuntu Studio and Steam communities. Last week Canonical announced that its engineering teams decided that Ubuntu should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture. “Consequently, i386 will not be included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu infrastructure,” wrote Will Cooke, Director of Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical.

  • Steam and Ubuntu clash over 32-bit libs

    It has been a tumultuous week for gaming on Linux. Last Tuesday afternoon, Canonical's Steve Langasek announced that 32-bit libs would be frozen (kept as-is, with no new builds or updates) as of this October's interim 19.10 release, codenamed "Eoan Ermine." Langasek was pretty clear that this did not mean abandoning support for running 32-bit applications, however.

  • Linux gamers take note: Steam won’t support the next version of Ubuntu

    Valve has announced that from the next version of Ubuntu (19.10), it will no longer support Steam on Ubuntu, the most popular flavor of Linux, due to the distro dropping support for 32-bit packages, This all kicked off when Canonical, developer of Ubuntu, announced that it was seemingly completely dropping support for 32-bit in Ubuntu 19.10. However, following a major outcry, a further clarification (or indeed, change of heart) came from the firm stating that there will actually be limited support for 32-bit going forward (although updates for 32-bit libraries will no longer be delivered, effectively leaving them in a frozen state).

  • Valve killing Steam Support for some Ubuntu users

    A few years ago the announcement that Steam would begin supporting Linux was a big deal: it meant that anyone who preferred to rock an open-source operating system over Mac OS or Windows 10 would have instant buy-it-and-play-it access to a large catalog of game titles that would have otherwise taken a whole lot of tweaking to get up and running or wouldn't have worked for them at all. For some, at least, the party may be coming to an end.

  • Steam is dropping support for Ubuntu, but not Linux entirely

    The availability of Steam on Linux has been a boom for gaming on the platform, especially with the recent addition of the Steam Play compatibility layer for running Windows-only games. Valve has always recommended that gamers run Ubuntu Linux, the most popular desktop Linux distribution, but that's now changing.

  • Canonical (sort of) backtracks: Ubuntu will continue to support (some) 32-bit software

    A few days after announcing it would effectively drop support for 32-bit software in future versions of the Ubuntu operating system, Canonical has decided to “change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages.” The company’s original decision sparked some backlash when it became clear that some existing apps and games would no longer run on Ubuntu 19.10 if the change were to proceed as planned. Valve, for example, announced it would continue to support older versions of Ubuntu, allowing users to continue running its popular Steam game client. But moving forward, the company said it would be focusing its Steam for Linux efforts on a different GNU/Linux distribution.

  • Just kidding? Ubuntu 32-bit moving forward, no word yet from Valve

    Due in part to the feedback given to the group over the weekend and because of their connections with Valve, Canonical did an about-face today. They’ve suggested that feedback from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community led them to change their plan and will “build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. Whether this will change Valve’s future with Ubuntu Steam, we’ll see.

  • Canonical backtracks on 32-bit Ubuntu cull, but warns that on your head be it

    CANONICAL HAS CONFIRMED a U-Turn on the controversial decision to drop 32-bit support for Ubuntu users later this year. The company has faced criticism from users who aren't happy with the plan to make Ubuntu purely 64-bit, which culminated at the weekend with Steam announcing it would pull support for Ubuntu. Many Steam games were never made in 64-bit and it would, therefore, devalue the offer. However, Canonical confirmed on Monday that following feedback from the community, it was clear that there is still a demand, and indeed a need for 32-bit binaries, and as such, it will provide "selected" builds for both Ubuntu 19.10 and the forthcoming Ubuntu 20.04. Canonical's announcement spoke of the highly passionate arguments from those who are in favour of maintaining both versions, thus forcing the team to take notice. However, it has made it clear that it's doing so under the weight of expectation, not because it agrees. "There is a real risk to anybody who is running a body of software that gets little testing. The facts are that most 32-bit x86 packages are hardly used at all," the firm said.