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Tuesday, 23 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux KVM Virtualization comes to IBM Power servers soon Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Nikon launches Android powered Coolpix S810c Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Sarah Watz Elected by Open Source Matters to Guide Joomla Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 8:30pm
Story Samsung’s flagship Galaxy S5 smartphone hits stores around the world Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 8:24pm
Story Wine 1.7.16 released Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 8:10pm
Story Salix MATE 14.1 Beta 1 Is Based on MATE 1.8 Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 6:41pm
Story Prisonscape Is a Brutal RPG Inspired by The Wire and Oz Set to Launch on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 6:35pm
Story UK cities start alliance on sharing and re-use Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 6:09pm
Story SparkyLinux 3.3.2-test1 Base Edition Is for Command-Line Aficionados Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 5:59pm
Story gnome code assistance Rianne Schestowitz 11/04/2014 - 5:54pm

5 stars of open-source products

Filed under
Software

Once a curiosity of computer rooms, open-source software applications are now giving commercial programs a run for their money in public-sector information technology shops. Here is a closer look at five open-source products and why they are winning favor in government IT shops.

PHP 5 Pushes Forward

Filed under
Software

Started just over ten years ago, the PHP programming language has become the most popular programming language for web application development. PHP 5, the most recent release, adds even more features — all the while remaining approachable to novices. Here’s a look at the life of PHP 5 so far.

Windows Is Offically Broken

Filed under
Microsoft

Windows is broken and Microsoft has admitted it. In an unprecedented attempt to explain its Longhorn problems and how it abandoned its traditional way of working, the normally secretive software giant has given unparalleled access to The Wall Street Journal, even revealing how Vice President Jim Allchin, personally broke the bad news to Bill Gates.

Unix is dead, Linux’s the future

Filed under
Linux

The end of the world is near. At last that of the Unix world. That’s the prediction of Donald Feinberg, vice-president of Gartner. “Linux is coming, Unix is dead.”

Is The PC Dead For Gamers?

Filed under
Gaming

Here's a big question that has been making the rounds of late: "Is the PC dead as a gaming platform?"

My oh my, Myah

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Myah is a simple and easy to use livecd for standard Intel or AMD powered computers. They state, "Our goal is to bring you the best free Operating System and to inform PC owners they don't have to spend their money on Windows or OS X." I don't know if it's the best, but it's certainly a pretty darn good one.

Symphony OS in the words of its developer

Filed under
Linux

Symphony OS is one of the most original Linux distros available today. Recently Ryan Quinn, the lead developer of Symphony OS took some time out to talk with me about the distro and a few other subjects.

Videos of KimDaBa in Action

Filed under
KDE
Software

For those of you who do not understand how to use KimDaBa, there is now no reason not to use it. KimDaBa is the first KDE application to offer small flash videos with voice-overs describing how to use it.

Also: Tonight's star of The People Behind KDE is geek girl Janet Theobroma.

Are AMD and Intel close to settling?

Filed under
Hardware

THE WAR DRUMS have gone silent and there's no sign of smoke signals in the antitrust case AMD launched against Intel back at the end of June.

Browsers Battle for Second Place

Filed under
Web

In the Internet-browser game, the idea of beating No. 1 Microsoft, whose Internet Explorer comes automatically bundled on most Windows computers, is so far out of reach that other players try for the next best thing: second place.

Say it loud: you play games and you're proud

Filed under
Gaming

Will it ever be OK to discuss videogames among adults? 56% of all gamers are aged between 24 and 44. And yet, very few people over the age of 30 talk about them.

When open source theory meets fact

Filed under
OSS

Open source theory and fact walked hand in hand this week. Pundits and prognosticators all came calling with their own miscellaneous and sundry opinions about how this whole open source thing works and what it really means.

How open? That's the big patent question

Filed under
Misc

If you were to accept patent production as a good proxy for innovative ability, you would quickly conclude that one of the software giants is a whole lot more creative than the others.

Kicking Linux's Tires

In times past, the only way to see if Linux would work on a given PC was to install the OS. Times change. If you like what you see, or you wanna see the real deal, why not set up your machine to dual boot?

Are open-source evangelists a threat to Microsoft?

Filed under
OSS

For Eric Raymond, it is all about art. For Louis Suarez-Potts, the allure is intellectual challenge and inclusion in a worldwide community. Hartselle's Shawn Woods just wants cheap software that works. He thinks open-source software may be the answer.

Former President Corners Microsoft Korea

Filed under
OSS

Former president of Microsoft Korea is leading the government initiative to boost open-source programs in place of Windows.

Security Update of Debian Saturated Hosting Provider Network

Filed under
Web

The recently released security update of XFree86 in DSA 816 for sarge and woody had caused the host of security.debian.org to saturate its 100MBit/s network connection entirely this past week.

Faith in The Gimp

Filed under
Software

One excellent open-source program that often gets overlooked in the focus on products like Linux is The Gimp. GIMP is an acronym for GNU Image Manipulation Program. It is freely distributed software for photo retouching, image composition and image authoring.

Open Letter to Alan Yates of Microsoft

Filed under
KDE

In his reply to the Massachusetts decision to use only documents in OpenDocument format, the Microsoft manager Alan Yates writes: (paraphrased) Star Office, Open Office, KOffice and IBM Workplace are all derivatives of the same codebase. Thus there is only one program that supports Open Document, and that is illegal. This is, of course, not true.

On Location With: DOOM: The Movie

Filed under
Movies
Gaming

I'm standing on the set of the upcoming DOOM film, and, as someone who played all the way through DOOM 3, it's quite a surreal experience.

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More in Tux Machines

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

Like its cousin, the Debian based version, Netrunner Rolling also ships a dark Look and Feel theme including the Kvantum theme engine. Using the Kvantum Theme engine plus the Alpha-Black Plasma Theme allowed us to create a more 3D-looking design. Moving the mouse into the lower right corner now visibly activates the “Minimize all Windows to show Desktop” function by a light glow. For those who prefer the classic look, going back to the well-known LNF is a three-button click and explained under “Tips” in our current Readme Section. Read more Also: Debian-Based Netrunner Linux Gets April 2019 Release with New Look and Feel

Android Leftovers

Server: Cloudwashing by SUSE and Openwashing by Red Hat

  • Why Hybrid Cloud is About to Get a Whole Lot Easier
    It seems like analysts, vendors and IT decision makers have been talking about “hybrid cloud” for the longest time. The concept has been around for at least a decade – and that’s a really long time in the IT industry. Is it still important? Absolutely. Almost every piece of cloud market research I read shows the majority of enterprises are focusing on a hybrid cloud strategy. Why? Because they all need increased agility, innovation and productivity, better cost optimization and improved customer experience.
  • The Open Organization guide to Red Hat Summit 2019 [Ed: The 'Open Organization' slant in Red Hat Summit 2019 with Microsoft CEO as keynote because it's all about money, not "open" or "free" (just proprietary and expensive]
    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst published The Open Organization in 2015, he didn't just release a book. He catalyzed a global conversation about the ways open principles are reshaping organizational culture and design.
  • Developing distributed applications and services for tomorrow: a proof of concept
    Innovation is accelerating across the automobile industry, bringing advances in the in-vehicle experience. Connected vehicle technologies are opening up new business models and providing a whole range of new software and data-driven services. When it comes to new software and data-driven services, the possibilities are immense. But there is one trend many use cases have in common: they are becoming more distributed. To provide a great user experience, connected in-vehicle services often need to integrate increasingly diverse data.

Security: Updates, One Year With Spectre, Purism Librem Key and Lanner’s 'Security Appliances' With Back-Doored Chips

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • A year with Spectre: a V8 perspective
    On January 3, 2018, Google Project Zero and others disclosed the first three of a new class of vulnerabilities that affect CPUs that perform speculative execution, dubbed Spectre and Meltdown. Using the speculative execution mechanisms of CPUs, an attacker could temporarily bypass both implicit and explicit safety checks in code that prevent programs from reading unauthorized data in memory. While processor speculation was designed to be a microarchitectural detail, invisible at the architectural level, carefully crafted programs could read unauthorized information in speculation and disclose it through side channels such as the execution time of a program fragment. When it was shown that JavaScript could be used to mount Spectre attacks, the V8 team became involved in tackling the problem. We formed an emergency response team and worked closely with other teams at Google, our partners at other browser vendors, and our hardware partners. In concert with them, we proactively engaged in both offensive research (constructing proof-of-concept gadgets) and defensive research (mitigations for potential attacks).
  • The Purism Librem Key
    The Librem Key is a new hardware token for improving Linux security by adding a physical authentication factor to booting, login and disk decryption on supported systems. It also has some features that make it a good general-purpose OpenPGP smart card. This article looks at how the Librem Key stacks up against other multi-factor tokens like the YubiKey 5 and also considers what makes the Librem Key a unique trusted-computing tool. Purism is a new player in the security key and multi-factor authentication markets. With the introduction of the Librem Key, Purism joins the ranks of other players—such as Yubico, Google, RSA and so on—in providing hardware tokens for multi-factor authentication. In addition, like the YubiKey 5 series, the Librem Key also provides OpenPGP support with cryptographic functions that take place securely on-key. This allows users to generate and use GnuPG public and private keys without exposing any secret key material to the host computer where the USB device is attached. The Librem Key is based on the German-manufactured Nitrokey Pro 2, but it has been modified to focus on "trusted boot" when used with Purism's Linux laptops. (I take a closer look at what the trusted boot process is and how the Librem Key fits into that process, later in this article.)
  • Atom-based network security appliances focus on industrial control
    Lanner’s Apollo Lake based “LEC-6041” and Bay Trail “LEC-6032” are Linux-supported network security appliances for industrial control monitoring with up to 7x GbE ports, including SFP ports, plus magnetic isolation and extended temp support.