Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 21 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

News Close to [my] Home

Filed under
Misc

Dude, You're Going To Hell!

Seems Dell has fired some Somali Muslims because their prayer schedule clashed with the production schedule. If the workers forge ahead with their plans to sue, "that path might lead to an unpleasant surprise for the workers. In a similar case last year,

Hot kNew Stuff

Filed under
KDE

ca asked why this interview with Josef Spillner wasn't on some of the biggie news sites, so I thought I'd share it on my teny tiny one.

"There has been some recent buzz around KDE's Get Hot New Stuff framework. As the first in a series looking into KDE technologies, KDE Dot News interviewed author Josef Spillner to find out what all this "stuff" was about... read on for the interview. You may also be interested in recent blog entries about KNewStuff: Kate, desktop backgrounds, Quanta, KNewStuffSecure, its user interface design and the HotStuff server setup."

Motherboard supports P4 and AMD64

Filed under
Hardware

Here at CeBIT 2005, you see innovation galore, but at the ECS stand they have something truly special that stands out as being one of the hottest products of the show. HEXUS brings you the ECS PF88, the first mainboard to support both Intel P4 AND AMD Athlon 64 processors.

NCsoft secures partial victory in Marvel lawsuit

Filed under
Gaming
Legal

In a ruling handed down Wednesday, the federal judge presiding over the lawsuit Marvel Enterprises brought against game publisher NCsoft has severely limited the overall scope of the suit.

Amazon settles shareholder suit

Filed under
Legal

Amazon.com will pay $27.5 million to settle a class-action shareholder lawsuit that alleged the company made false or misleading statements about its financial health over a three-year period during which its stock fell to less than half its value.

Full Story.

Microsoft's Sun server fetish revealed

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

Shocking pictures leaked by a careless Microsoft blogger reveal a love that dare not speak its name. The photos from the Redmond campus are, in fact, so raunchy and audacious that a special Register editorial meeting was held to discuss whether or not they should even be discussed in an open forum. In the end, we decided to go ahead with the photos. It seemed like the right thing to do.

Judge Sides with Apple in Lawsuit over Product Leaks

Filed under
Mac
Legal

A California court ruled Friday that an online journalist's ISP must reveal the identities of the reporter's confidential sources to attorneys from Apple Computer Inc., rejecting a request for an order to protect the confidentiality of the sources and other unpublished information.

What's particularly ominous for journalists of all stripes, be they print or online, freelance or associated with a media outlet, is how the court has overlooked the importance of protecting journalists' sources in such a relatively trivial matter as an Apple product launch, Cohn said.

KDE user's look at Gnome-2.10

Filed under
Reviews

I guess it's no secret that I'm a KDE user. But every once in a while I like to login to others to see what's new. As such, this will be a newbie's look at gnome.

M$ to Pay $60 million Settlement

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft will pay Burst.com, a developer of software for streaming audio and video over the Internet, $60 million to settle a patent infringement and antitrust lawsuit, the world's largest software maker said on Friday.

Nvidia releases Version: 1.0-7167

Filed under
Software

New nvidia drivers folks.

Release Highlights:

Support for GeForce 6200 with TurboCache™ GPUs

Improved OpenGL workstation performance.

Added support for XRandR rotation; see

Appendix W in the text README.

Director of the SSI at M$ Speaks

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Jason Matusow, the Director of the Shared Source Initiative at Microsoft shares his views and interpretations of Open Source licenses and what they mean to M$ in terms of development.

n/a

GDC Choice Awards

Filed under
Gaming
Half-Life 2 tops GDC Choice Awards


Best Game:
Half-Life 2 (Valve Software/Vivendi Universal Games)

New Studio:
Crytek (Far Cry)

Writing:
Half-Life 2 (Valve Software/Vivendi Universal Games)

Linux Advisory Watch - March 11, 2005

Filed under
Security

This week, advisories were released for clamav, kernel, squid, kppp, helixplayer, tzdata, libtool, firefox, ipsec-tools, dmraid, gaim, libexif, gimp, yum, grip, libXpm, xv, ImageMagick, Hashcash, mlterm, dcoidlng, curl, gftp, cyrus-imapd, unixODBC, and mc. The distributors include Conectiva, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mandrake, Red Hat, and SuSE.

Full Details.

What if patents applied to literature?

Filed under
Legal

I'd like to compare software with another field whose work is also principally protected by copyright - literature. Perhaps the comparison seems odd to you, but I assure you that software developers are just as involved with their programs as any author is with his next novel. The creative process is just as difficult, and the protection offered by copyright is just as strong. The law certainly sees no difference between an artful sonnet and a carefully crafted subroutine.

DVD+RW 8x drives to ship in 'coming months'

Filed under
Hardware

CeBIT 2005: The DVD+RW Alliance yesterday forecast the widespread introduction of 8x DVD+RW hardware and media in Q2 and held out the prospect of 16x speeds in the Autumn.

The same timeframe could see the arrival of 16x DVD+R dual-layer (DL) drives and media, the organisation announced this week at CeBIT in an update of its roadmap.

Link.

robogrover

Filed under
Sci/Tech

grover sat alone on the shelf, placid red smile stiched across his goofy blue face. his fabric eyed gaze never shifted.

he couldn’t see it coming.

when the knife pulled free from the back of his head, his polyester brains spilled to the floor. only a sad smile remained. had grover only been able to see his attacker, things may have been different.

grover the muppet — barely alive.
we can rebuild him. we have the technology.

Full Details with pics.

Gates keeps top spot on list of billionaires

Filed under
Microsoft

Thanks to a surge in demand for steel, the Internet and Scandinavian sofas, there are some new names among the very richest of the world's billionaires.

The billionaires are richer and more numerous for the second straight year, but the No. 1 spot is unchanged — Microsoft founder Bill Gates led the list for the 11th year in a row with a net worth of $46.5 billion, slightly less than his $46.6 billion last year.

Pope’s email server packed

Filed under
Misc

Since [the Holy Father] posted his address more than 20,000 emails have shown up in his in tray between March 1 to March 3. The INQ inbox had about the same number of emails during the same people, but they were trying to sell us stuff.

Desktop Linux wins plaudits for stability

Filed under
Linux

Companies who choose open source software over Windows for their enterprise resource planning tend to be surprised by the absence of crashes, according to users and vendors. A company that migrated from Microsoft Windows to Linux on the desktop has praised the open source operating system's stability.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

How to use Spark SQL: A hands-on tutorial

In the first part of this series, we looked at advances in leveraging the power of relational databases "at scale" using Apache Spark SQL and DataFrames. We will now do a simple tutorial based on a real-world dataset to look at how to use Spark SQL. We will be using Spark DataFrames, but the focus will be more on using SQL. In a separate article, I will cover a detailed discussion around Spark DataFrames and common operations. I love using cloud services for my machine learning, deep learning, and even big data analytics needs, instead of painfully setting up my own Spark cluster. I will be using the Databricks Platform for my Spark needs. Databricks is a company founded by the creators of Apache Spark that aims to help clients with cloud-based big data processing using Spark. Read more Also: Scaling relational databases with Apache Spark SQL and DataFrames

4 questions Uber's open source program office answers with data

It's been said that "Software is eating the world," and every company will eventually become a "software company." Since open source is becoming the mainstream path for developing software, the way companies manage their relationships with the open source projects they depend on will be crucial for their success. An open source program office (OSPO) is a company's asset to manage such relationships, and more and more companies are setting them up. Even the Linux Foundation has a project called the TODO Group "to collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs". Read more

Kernel: LWN on Linux 5.1 and More, 'Lake'-named Hardware

  • 5.1 Merge window part 1
    As of this writing, 6,135 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 5.1 release. That is approximately halfway through the expected merge-window volume, which is a good time for a summary. A number of important new features have been merged for this release; read on for the details.
  • Controlling device peer-to-peer access from user space
    The recent addition of support for direct (peer-to-peer) operations between PCIe devices in the kernel has opened the door for different use cases. The initial work concentrated on in-kernel support and the NVMe subsystem; it also added support for memory regions that can be used for such transfers. Jérôme Glisse recently proposed two extensions that would allow the mapping of those regions into user space and mapping device files between two devices. The resulting discussion surprisingly led to consideration of the future of core kernel structures dealing with memory management. Some PCIe devices can perform direct data transfers to other devices without involving the CPU; support for these peer-to-peer transactions was added to the kernel for the 4.20 release. The rationale behind the functionality is that, if the data is passed between two devices without modification, there is no need to involve the CPU, which can perform other tasks instead. The peer-to-peer feature was developed to allow Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) network interface cards to pass data directly to NVMe drives in the NVMe fabrics subsystem. Using peer-to-peer transfers lowers the memory bandwidth needed (it avoids one copy operation in the standard path from device to system memory, then to another device) and CPU usage (the devices set up the DMAs on their own). While not considered directly in the initial work, graphics processing units (GPUs) and RDMA interfaces have been able to use that functionality in out-of-tree modules for years. The merged work concentrated on support at the PCIe layer. It included setting up special memory regions and the devices that will export and use those regions. It also allows finding out if the PCIe topology allows the peer-to-peer transfers.
  • Intel Posts Linux Perf Support For Icelake CPUs
    With the core functionality for Intel Icelake CPUs appearing to be in place, Intel's open-source developers have been working on the other areas of hardware enablement for these next-generation processors. The latest Icelake Linux patches we are seeing made public by Intel is in regards to the "perf" subsystem support. Perf, of course, is about exposing the hardware performance counters and associated instrumentation that can be exercised by user-space when profiling performance of the hardware and other events.
  • What is after Gemini Lake?
    Based on a 10 nm manufacturing process, the Elkhart Lake SoC uses Tremont microarchitectures (Atom) [2] and features Gen 11 graphics similar to the Ice Lake processors [3]. Intel’s Gen 11 solution offers 64 execution units, and it has managed over 1 TFLOP in GPU performance [4]. This can be compared with the Nvidia GeForce GT 1030 which offered a peak throughput of 0.94 TFLOPs [5]. Code has already been added in the Linux mainline kernel [6] suggesting a possible Computex announcement and mid to late 2019 availability [7].

GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and GNOME Bugzilla

  • Parental controls hackfest
    Various of us have been meeting in the Red Hat offices in London this week (thanks Red Hat!) to discuss parental controls and digital wellbeing. The first two days were devoted to this; today and tomorrow will be dedicated to discussing metered data (which is unrelated to parental controls, but the hackfests are colocated because many of the same people are involved in both).
  • GNOME Bugzilla closed for new bug entry
    As part of GNOME’s ongoing migration from Bugzilla to Gitlab, from today on there are no products left in GNOME Bugzilla which allow the creation of new tickets. The ID of the last GNOME Bugzilla ticket is 797430 (note that there are gaps between 173191–200000 and 274555–299999 as the 2xxxxx ID range was used for tickets imported from Ximian Bugzilla). Since the year 2000, the Bugzilla software had served as GNOME’s issue tracking system. As forges emerged which offer tight and convenient integration of issue tracking, code review of proposed patches, automated continuous integration testing, code repository browsing and hosting and further functionality, Bugzilla’s shortcomings became painful obstacles for modern software development practices. Nearly all products which used GNOME Bugzilla have moved to GNOME Gitlab to manage issues. A few projects (Bluefish, Doxygen, GnuCash, GStreamer, java-gnome, LDTP, NetworkManager, Tomboy) have moved to other places (such as freedesktop.org Gitlab, self-hosted Bugzilla instances, or Github) to track their issues.