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Thursday, 22 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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YAMR: Mandriva Linux 2006

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

MandrakeLinux always had a reputation as an ideal distribution for beginners. Now that the renamed Mandriva has included technologies from Conectiva and Lycoris into Mandriva Linux 2006, this reputation seems more justified than ever.

Shout goes out over PHP security bugs

Filed under
Security

Security researchers have identified numerous new vulnerabilities in PHP - the popular, open source web development environment.

The Concept of "Interfaces"

Filed under
Software

Novell recently released some video of "usability" testing featuring 11 people who were familiar with Windows trying to accomplish various tasks under the Linux Desktop. Now, to me, that doesn't sound really effective.

M$ is Threatening Korea Again

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft, the world’s biggest software maker, has renewed its threat to pull the Windows operating system out of Korea, if the ongoing investigation by the nation’s antitrust agency doesn’t turn out to be in its favor.

Open source start-ups make their pitch - in public

Filed under
OSS

Three open source start-up executives Tuesday showed their daring by making pitches to potential customers. What made them daring is that they did it in front of dozens of attendees at the Open Source Business Conference in Newton, Mass.

Linux PCs: Customer service or lip service?

Filed under
Linux

Thinking about buying a new Linux-based home PC? Happy hunting.

n/a

How to Save Your Neck in a Four Easy Steps

Filed under
Misc

Say what you will about Novell CEO Jack Messman, he's no dummy. Maybe it's for the good of Novell or maybe just to save his own neck, but since early September when Blum Capital and Credit Suisse First Boston went public with their gripes that the former railroad exec was fumbling Novell's golden opportunity to be the Red Hat challenger, he has been making big conciliatory moves fast.

The Yin and Yang of Open Source Commerce, Part 1

Filed under
OSS

In this series, we will consider key aspects that impact the future of OSS in the business and consumer markets. Will OSS re-shape the entire IT industry, or will it never be more than a passing fad for niche players?

Trying out the new OpenBSD 3.8

Filed under
Reviews

Yesterday OpenBSD, the proactively secure Unix-like operating system, released version 3.8, featuring several improvements to networking, RAID management tools, and increased security. I took this new release as an opportunity to perform my first ever OpenBSD install.

OSBC, DAY 1

Filed under
OSS

Well, that was a day well spent. Today's day at OSBC was a solid investment of my time. The most interesting interchanges came on borrowed time in hallways with folks like Stephe Walli or Scott Dietzen, but I'm delighted to report that the sessions were almost universally high value.

Image Management with F-Spot

Filed under
Software

Images. Oodles and oodles of images. Images coming out of your ears. Images scattered all over your hard drive. Images everywhere, relentlessly growing in numbers! How can your organize such an insane glut of images? Help!

Novell Changes Leadership

Filed under
Linux

Novell announced on Tuesday that the previous day its board of directors had promoted Ron Hovsepian, executive VP and president of global field operations, to president and chief operating officer of Novell.

Open Source For The Next Generation

Filed under
OSS

For today's young adults, buying shrink-wrapped software to load on a PC is as foreign as fiddling with rabbit ears to improve TV reception.

n/a

Move over, Mac Mini -- MiniPC runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

A Taiwanese systems integrator is readying a tiny 6.5 x 6.5 x 2 Linux-powered PC likely to make even Mac Mini owners envious.

PCLinuxOS .92 Test 02 ISO Available

Filed under
PCLOS

Houston, TX, November 1, 2005: PCLinuxOS .92 Test 02 is available. PCLinuxOS .92 features an updated 2.6.12-oci6 kernel, k3b, gimp, smb4k, kdemoreartwork, bluetooth, resierfs-progs, ntfs-progs and the following update from Test 01:

New book explains how to "Just Say No" to Windows

Filed under
Linux

Despite all the drawbacks, why haven't users switched to Mac or Linux? Tony Bove answers these questions and explains how to "escape the Beast from Redmond and still function," in his new book, Just Say No to Microsoft.

My sysadmin toolbox

Filed under
Software

Every administrator has a set of software tools that he just can't live without. These are the utilities that you install as soon as you log into a new machine, to help make day-to-day tasks a little easier. Here are my top 10 tools.

November 2005 of TUX, Issue 8

Filed under
Linux

The November issue of TUX is now available for download. This months version includes Linux on Hardware, Inkscape: the Elements of Design (2), Give Multiple Distros the Boot, and much much more.

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More in Tux Machines

How the Linux desktop has grown

I first installed Linux in 1993. At that time, you really didn't have many options for installing the operating system. In those early days, many people simply copied a running image from someone else. Then someone had the neat idea to create a "distribution" of Linux that let you customize what software you wanted to install. That was the Softlanding Linux System (SLS) and my first introduction to Linux. My '386 PC didn't have much memory, but it was enough. SLS 1.03 required 2MB of memory to run, or 4MB if you wanted to compile programs. If you wanted to run the X Window System, you needed a whopping 8MB of memory. And my PC had just enough memory to run X. Read more

Android Leftovers

Intel's New OpenGL Driver Is Looking Really Great With The Upcoming Mesa 19.2

Intel's new open-source OpenGL Linux driver "Iris" Gallium3D that has been in development for the past two years or so is getting ready to enter the limelight. Months ago they talked of plans to have it ready to become their default OpenGL driver by the end of the calendar year and with the state of Mesa 19.2 it's looking like that goal can be realized in time. With our new tests of this driver, in most games and other graphics applications the performance of this Gallium3D driver is now beyond that of their "classic" i965 Mesa driver. Over the past year we've been looking a lot at the Intel Gallium3D performance and it's been a remarkable journey from the performance starting out well below their decade old OpenGL driver to now mostly exceeding that classic Mesa driver and often times by wide margins. The Intel Gallium3D driver is also largely now to feature parity in terms of OpenGL extensions and other capabilities. With all of their bases covered, this summer for the upcoming Mesa 19.2 release we've been seeing a lot of performance optimizations land. Back in April is when they indicated they hope to have it become the default by end of year 2019 and viable by Mesa 19.2. Read more

OSS: OpenSMTPD, Connexta, Square and Google

  • FLOSS Weekly 543: OpenSMTPD

    OpenSMTPD is a FREE implementation of the server-side SMTP protocol as defined by RFC 5321, with some additional standard extensions. It allows ordinary machines to exchange emails with other systems speaking the SMTP protocol.

  • Octo Acquires Connexta to Enhance Open Source Software Development Capabilities

    Octo, a premier provider of next-generation services for the Federal market, today announced its acquisition of Connexta, a Phoenix, Arizona-based global leader in open source software development and secure discovery solutions for government and commercial customers

  • Square Crypto’s Open Source Endeavor, Fostering Bitcoin Development will Witness Matt Corallo On Board

    Square, Inc. is a mobile payment company based in San Francisco, California. The company markets software and hardware payments products and has expanded into business services. Square Crypto the division of parent company Square, Inc. is a payments solutions provider and focuses on open source Bitcoin development. Jack Dorsey, CEO of the Square, Inc. foresees a bullish vehement regarding the acceptance of Bitcoins and the urge to conceptualize Bitcoin as a utopia invigorates the formation of this new team which will be headed by Steve Lee, a former director at Google and Matt Corallo as the first development engineer.

  • Google open-sources gesture tracking AI for mobile devices

    Real-time hand shape and motion trackers are an invaluable part of sign language recognition and gesture control systems, not to mention a number of augmented reality experiences. But they’re often hobbled by occlusion and a lack of contrast patterns, preventing them from performing reliably or robustly. Those challenges and others motivated scientists at Google to investigate a new computer vision approach to hand perception — one bolstered by machine learning. They say that in experiments, it managed to infer up to 21 3D points of a hand (or multiple hands) on a mobile phone from just a single frame.