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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 18 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story elementary OS Gets a Development Version, Download Now Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:50pm
Story You can't have DevOps without open source Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:47pm
Story Quake III bounty: we have a winner! Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:39pm
Story Why Windows XP's Demise Is Bad for Linux and Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:33pm
Story KDE Ships April Updates to Applications, Platform and Plasma Workspaces Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:23pm
Story Link-Time Optimizations Near Reality For x86 Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:08pm
Story Valve Is Helping Developers Port Games to Linux, Star Conflict to Be Launched Soon Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 2:01pm
Story ODF 1.2 Submitted to ISO Roy Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 1:54pm
Story Ubuntu Complete Convergence Demonstrated with the Weather App Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 1:50pm
Story Libata Improvements Enhance AHCI On Linux 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 01/04/2014 - 1:37pm

Microsoft Monopoly Will Wane, Experts Say

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft's Explorer browser is already losing market share. It recently fell below the 90 percent mark because of competition from such rivals as the Firefox open-source browser. The Massachusetts Institute of Techology's Thomas Malone said he wouldn't predict how much Microsoft's dominance might fall.

Don't dump your stocks in the software giant, experts warn.

News Close to [my] Home

Filed under
Misc

Dude, You're Going To Hell!

Seems Dell has fired some Somali Muslims because their prayer schedule clashed with the production schedule. If the workers forge ahead with their plans to sue, "that path might lead to an unpleasant surprise for the workers. In a similar case last year,

Hot kNew Stuff

Filed under
KDE

ca asked why this interview with Josef Spillner wasn't on some of the biggie news sites, so I thought I'd share it on my teny tiny one.

"There has been some recent buzz around KDE's Get Hot New Stuff framework. As the first in a series looking into KDE technologies, KDE Dot News interviewed author Josef Spillner to find out what all this "stuff" was about... read on for the interview. You may also be interested in recent blog entries about KNewStuff: Kate, desktop backgrounds, Quanta, KNewStuffSecure, its user interface design and the HotStuff server setup."

Motherboard supports P4 and AMD64

Filed under
Hardware

Here at CeBIT 2005, you see innovation galore, but at the ECS stand they have something truly special that stands out as being one of the hottest products of the show. HEXUS brings you the ECS PF88, the first mainboard to support both Intel P4 AND AMD Athlon 64 processors.

NCsoft secures partial victory in Marvel lawsuit

Filed under
Gaming
Legal

In a ruling handed down Wednesday, the federal judge presiding over the lawsuit Marvel Enterprises brought against game publisher NCsoft has severely limited the overall scope of the suit.

Amazon settles shareholder suit

Filed under
Legal

Amazon.com will pay $27.5 million to settle a class-action shareholder lawsuit that alleged the company made false or misleading statements about its financial health over a three-year period during which its stock fell to less than half its value.

Full Story.

Microsoft's Sun server fetish revealed

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

Shocking pictures leaked by a careless Microsoft blogger reveal a love that dare not speak its name. The photos from the Redmond campus are, in fact, so raunchy and audacious that a special Register editorial meeting was held to discuss whether or not they should even be discussed in an open forum. In the end, we decided to go ahead with the photos. It seemed like the right thing to do.

Judge Sides with Apple in Lawsuit over Product Leaks

Filed under
Mac
Legal

A California court ruled Friday that an online journalist's ISP must reveal the identities of the reporter's confidential sources to attorneys from Apple Computer Inc., rejecting a request for an order to protect the confidentiality of the sources and other unpublished information.

What's particularly ominous for journalists of all stripes, be they print or online, freelance or associated with a media outlet, is how the court has overlooked the importance of protecting journalists' sources in such a relatively trivial matter as an Apple product launch, Cohn said.

KDE user's look at Gnome-2.10

Filed under
Reviews

I guess it's no secret that I'm a KDE user. But every once in a while I like to login to others to see what's new. As such, this will be a newbie's look at gnome.

M$ to Pay $60 million Settlement

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Microsoft will pay Burst.com, a developer of software for streaming audio and video over the Internet, $60 million to settle a patent infringement and antitrust lawsuit, the world's largest software maker said on Friday.

Nvidia releases Version: 1.0-7167

Filed under
Software

New nvidia drivers folks.

Release Highlights:

Support for GeForce 6200 with TurboCache™ GPUs

Improved OpenGL workstation performance.

Added support for XRandR rotation; see

Appendix W in the text README.

Director of the SSI at M$ Speaks

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Jason Matusow, the Director of the Shared Source Initiative at Microsoft shares his views and interpretations of Open Source licenses and what they mean to M$ in terms of development.

n/a

GDC Choice Awards

Filed under
Gaming
Half-Life 2 tops GDC Choice Awards


Best Game:
Half-Life 2 (Valve Software/Vivendi Universal Games)

New Studio:
Crytek (Far Cry)

Writing:
Half-Life 2 (Valve Software/Vivendi Universal Games)

Linux Advisory Watch - March 11, 2005

Filed under
Security

This week, advisories were released for clamav, kernel, squid, kppp, helixplayer, tzdata, libtool, firefox, ipsec-tools, dmraid, gaim, libexif, gimp, yum, grip, libXpm, xv, ImageMagick, Hashcash, mlterm, dcoidlng, curl, gftp, cyrus-imapd, unixODBC, and mc. The distributors include Conectiva, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mandrake, Red Hat, and SuSE.

Full Details.

What if patents applied to literature?

Filed under
Legal

I'd like to compare software with another field whose work is also principally protected by copyright - literature. Perhaps the comparison seems odd to you, but I assure you that software developers are just as involved with their programs as any author is with his next novel. The creative process is just as difficult, and the protection offered by copyright is just as strong. The law certainly sees no difference between an artful sonnet and a carefully crafted subroutine.

DVD+RW 8x drives to ship in 'coming months'

Filed under
Hardware

CeBIT 2005: The DVD+RW Alliance yesterday forecast the widespread introduction of 8x DVD+RW hardware and media in Q2 and held out the prospect of 16x speeds in the Autumn.

The same timeframe could see the arrival of 16x DVD+R dual-layer (DL) drives and media, the organisation announced this week at CeBIT in an update of its roadmap.

Link.

robogrover

Filed under
Sci/Tech

grover sat alone on the shelf, placid red smile stiched across his goofy blue face. his fabric eyed gaze never shifted.

he couldn’t see it coming.

when the knife pulled free from the back of his head, his polyester brains spilled to the floor. only a sad smile remained. had grover only been able to see his attacker, things may have been different.

grover the muppet — barely alive.
we can rebuild him. we have the technology.

Full Details with pics.

Gates keeps top spot on list of billionaires

Filed under
Microsoft

Thanks to a surge in demand for steel, the Internet and Scandinavian sofas, there are some new names among the very richest of the world's billionaires.

The billionaires are richer and more numerous for the second straight year, but the No. 1 spot is unchanged — Microsoft founder Bill Gates led the list for the 11th year in a row with a net worth of $46.5 billion, slightly less than his $46.6 billion last year.

Pope’s email server packed

Filed under
Misc

Since [the Holy Father] posted his address more than 20,000 emails have shown up in his in tray between March 1 to March 3. The INQ inbox had about the same number of emails during the same people, but they were trying to sell us stuff.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.