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Sunday, 26 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Comparing more live version upgrade methods

Filed under
GNU
Linux

At the end of May I set out to discover how well a handful of popular Linux distributions (and FreeBSD) would handle a live upgrade between major versions. The results were mostly positive with four of the five open source operating systems successfully upgrading to their latest version.

Following that article, some people asked if I would perform similar upgrade tests on other projects. This past week I set out to perform live upgrades on four more open source operating systems and report on the results.

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Best Cheap Android Smartphones [2016]

Filed under
Android

Last year was all about cheap or budget Android smartphones, and in 2016 buyers have more choices than ever before. Devices like the Moto G, the cheap Moto X Pure Edition, OnePlus 3 and much more. However, those who want really cheap Android devices, will want to read on for our collection of the best cheap Android smartphones.

Everyone doesn’t need a high-end Android phone, want to sign a 2-year contract, or pay over $600 for a smartphone. And if you’re one of the millions looking for a cheaper route we have a list of some pretty great phones for under $249, and a few that cost a little more but still won’t break the bank.

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Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • Wayland in Plasma 5.7

    Last week we released the beta version of Plasma 5.7 which means we know what this release will have for better Wayland support. First of all I need to mention what didn’t make it: unfortunately I missed the freeze of Frameworks 5.23 to land support for xdg-shell. I have a working implementation, but was not yet satisfied with the API. This is a difficult interface to provide an API for due to the unstable nature of the interface. Due to lack of xdg-shell support GTK applications are still going to use X11 on Wayland (like the Firefox window I’m just typing this blog post in).

  • The State Of Wayland For KDE Plasma 5.7

    There are a lot of Wayland support improvements to find in the upcoming release of KDE's Plasma 5.7.

    Wayland advancements for KDE Plasma 5.7 include the improved task manager, virtual keyboard support, sub-surface support, improved input device support, and more. However, missing from Plasma 5.7 is their XDG-Shell support as the API wasn't stabilized in time.

  • Qt 5.6.1-1 Released

    The problem with Qt 5.6.1, reported in QTBUG-53761, is that certain Qt Quick applications crash after some time. The problem occurs with code that loads more than 64 components (.qml or .js files) without instantiating objects from all of them. The components that initially don’t get instantiated will then be removed from the type cache, which causes problems if you later try to instantiate objects from them. Reason for the problem is too aggressive trimming of the QML type cache, which ends up deleting some QML types even though they were still in use by the application.

  • Qt 5.6.1-1 Released To Fix A Critical Problem

    Qt 5.6.1 was released earlier this month to fix outstanding issues with the Qt 5.6 tool-kit release while today the 5.6.1-1 hot-fix release is available to fix a critical problem.

    Slipping into Qt 5.6.1 was a regression that prevented certain types of Qt Quick applications from working correctly. This issue with Qt 5.6.1 would cause Qt Quick applications to crash but did not affect the newer Qt 5.7.0 release.

  • Call for submissions for the 2016 Art of Krita Book

    The Krita Foundation is going to publish a glossy, shiny book of art created with Krita! This book will be sent out to the seventy Kickstarter backers who selected the artbook as their reward, and it will be available from the Krita shop. We’ll also try and make sure it’s available through online bookshops! It’s the very first time the Krita Foundation will publish a book, and we’re really excited about it.

  • Interview with Jennifer Reuter

    If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be, and why?

  • Farewell to the Mountains

    So the last train has left Randa, and we can look back at a — judging from the bugs that were fixed and the ideas that were traded and the code that was written — successful sprint. The last two days were characterized by the authentic Randa Internet experience, in which a mountain goat eats 18% of the packets, but that doesn’t stop KDE developers from writing code and sharing AppImages.

  • KDE neon Press Coverage and Comments

    KDE neon User Edition 5.6 came out a couple of weeks ago, let’s have a look at the commentry.

  • My LaKademy 2016

    In the end of May, ~20 gearheads from different countries of Latin America were together in Rio de Janeiro working in several fronts of the KDE. This is our ‘multiple projects sprint’ named LaKademy!

    Like all previous editions of LaKademy, this year I worked hard in Cantor; unlike all previous editions, this year I did some work in new projects to be released in some point in the future. So, let’s see my report of LaKademy 2016.

  • Doxyqml 0.3.0 released

    The master branch of Doxyqml, a QML input filter for Doxygen, had been waiting for a release for a long time. Olivier Churlaud, the new KApidox hero, reported that it did not work with Python 3 and submitted a patch to fix this.

  • Cutelyst 0.12.0 is out!

    Cutelyst a web framework built with Qt is now closer to have it’s first stable release, with it becoming 3 years old at the end of the year I’m doing my best to finally iron it to get an API/ABI compromise, this release is full of cool stuff and a bunch of breaks which most of the time just require recompiling.

  • Peruse 1.0 "The Birthday Release"

    One day, about half a year or so ago, it came up in a discussion that while we in KDE have a lovely document viewer named Okular, we don't have something that is well suited to actually reading things, comic books in particular. So, a project was hatched to fix this. I've blogged about it before, and made a few tweets on the topic, but today is special. Today, 1.0 happens.

Slacko 6.3.2 is released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am excited to announce the release of Puppy Linux Slacko 6.3.2. It is available in 32 bit and 64 bit versions.

This might be called a bugfix release to Slacko 6.3.0 but it is so much more than that!

This is the first ever official puppy to support UEFI booting for both for 32 and 64 bit versions and the same ISO image will boot legacy BIOS PCs as well. And there is so much more that is improved, such as the theming, sound detection, firewall, default application management plus our home grown apps such as pMusic.

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Fedora 24 Workstation Review: All Work and Very Little Play

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora 24 brings with it a number of technical improvements, software upgrades, and under the hood. It’s clear that the Fedora developers have been working closely with upstream sources to tightly integrate advances in everything from the kernel to GNOME, Systemd, NetworkManager, and GCC6 which have all been forged into a powerful core. However, that’s about where it ends.

When it comes to a being a full fledged desktop distribution, Fedora 24 falls a bit short, and that’s mostly due to the Fedora project’s limited repositories.

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Also: Fedora 24 Released With New Features, Download ISO Files Here

Fedora 24, openSUSE 42.2 Alpha, Snappy Coverage

Filed under
-s

Fedora 24 was released today to many headlines and LinuxConfig.org posted the first official review. openSUSE 42.2 saw an alpha release today giving users a bit of a sneak peek. Interestingly, Matt Asay and Bruce Byfield both authored stories today on the press coverage of Canonical's Snap announcement - both saying the press believed the hype hook, line, and sinker.

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Kernel Space Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Trying Various OpenGL 4.x Games On Linux With An Intel Skylake Core i5

    With the imminent Mesa 12.0 release there is now OpenGL 4.3 compliance for Intel Broadwell graphics hardware and newer, rather than OpenGL 3.3 as was the upper limit in the Intel Mesa driver to this point. Now having OpenGL 4.x support with this open-source Intel driver, I decided to see how various OpenGL 4.x games are running with the Intel driver when using a Skylake CPU sporting HD Graphics 530.

  • AMDGPU Fixes For Polaris Queuing Up For Linux 4.7

    Yesterday I mentioned how the AMDGPU driver needed some important last minute fixes for the soon-to-launch Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" support. Those patches are now pending to be pulled as part of the next round of DRM fixes heading into Linux 4.7.

  • Intel Submits Another Batch Of DRM Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 4.8

    Just weeks after their first round of DRM updates for Linux 4.8 were submitted, the Intel crew has their second -- of a possible three -- feature updates readied for the Linux 4.8 kernel via DRM-Next.

  • Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Last RC Is Out Now

    As expected, the fourth and last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 has been announced on June 21, 2016, by Collabora's Emil Velikov.

    Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Release Candidate 4 incorporates the latest fixes and improvements that the development team behind the open-source Mesa 3D project managed to introduce during the last week, since the release of the third Mesa 3D 12.0.0 RC build.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • openSUSE Conference 2016 Day 1

    The first day of this year’s openSUSE Conference went well and the keynote speaker team of SaltStack Chief Technical Officer and technical founder Thomas Hatch along with Senior SaltStack Engineer David Boucha and SUSE’s Joe Werner showed how powerful Salt is for IT automation.

    Boucha gave a live demo and Hatch talked about the evolution of Salt and even talked a little about Salt’s Thorium Reactor, which was added to Salt as an experimental feature in the 2016.3.0 release. Werner discussed how SUSE uses Salt with SUSE Manager.

  • Building a better LibrePlanet: What we learned from the conference surveys

    Our samples are usually about sixty to seventy respondents, and self-selecting -- from their responses, we can say with confidence that LibrePlanet attendees feel we're doing a decent job organizing the conference. The questions "How much did you enjoy the sessions you attended, compared to those at other conferences you have attended?" and "How likely is it that you will return to LibrePlanet next year?" received an average of about 3.5 out of 4 each of the last three years.

  • Do you GNU? Attend the GNU Hackers' Meeting in France this summer!

    The GNU Hackers' Meeting is a friendly, semi-formal forum to discuss technical, social, and organizational issues concerning free software and GNU. This is a great opportunity to meet GNU maintainers and active contributors.

Mutter Receives Wayland Improvements, Memory Leak Plugged from GNOME Shell

Filed under
GNOME

We reported earlier on the release of the GNOME 3.21.3 desktop environment, which was made available for early adopters and public testers who want to see what's coming to GNOME 3.22 later this year.

The GNOME Shell user interface and Mutter window and compositing manager have been updated to version 3.21.3 as well, and we would like to tell you all about the improvements and new features that landed in these new development releases.

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PulseAudio 9.0 is out

Filed under
Software
  • PulseAudio 9.0 is out
  • PulseAudio 9.0 Sound System Released, Supports Sample Rates Up to 384 kHz

    Just a few minute ago, June 22, 2016, Arun Raghavan proudly announced the debut of the PulseAudio 9.0 sound server for GNU/Linux operating systems, a major release that introduces several improvements and new features.

    Prominent features of PulseAudio 9.0 include support for sample rates up to 384 kHz, the implementation of a memfd-backed shared memory transport, significant improvements to the automatic routing functionality, as well as the adoption of the C11 C standard instead of C99.

    Furthermore, it looks like PulseAudio 9.0 comes with LFE (Low-frequency Effects) remixing disabled by default, which was enabled as part of the PulseAudio 7.0 release, the module-role-ducking and module-role-cork modules received various enhancements, and webrtc-audio-processing 0.2 or later is now required.

  • PulseAudio 9.0 Released With Many Audio Improvements

    Version 9.0 of the once-controversial PulseAudio sound server is now available for your open-source audio needs.

    First off, PulseAudio 9.0 brings the memfd transport support for Linux systems. This lets PulseAudio use Memfd on newer Linxu kernel versions rather than POSIX SHM shared memory.

Linux AIO Brings All the Debian Live 7.11.0 Editions Into a Single ISO Image

Filed under
Debian

Today, June 22, 2016, Softpedia has been informed by the Linux AIO developers about the immediate availability for download of the Linux AIO Debian Live 7.11.0 ISO images.

Linux AIO is a non-profit project whose main goal is to create Live, bootable ISO images that contain all the essential Live editions of various popular GNU/Linux distributions. For example, you'll find Live ISOs with all the official Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora, Zorin OS, or PCLinuxOS Live flavors.

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Mozilla rebrand

Filed under
Moz/FF

PS3 Settlement

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Legal

Raspberry Pi controls Linux devices without the hassle

Filed under
Linux

A developer in Latvia has come up with a clever but simple control interface for your Linux devices which can be embedded Raspberry Pi designs.

Dubbed pyLCI, the software framework runs on the Raspberry Pi as long as it is connected to a suitable display and will control and configure a Linux system in headless mode.

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Developer: TIzen SCM Tool Released – 16.02

Filed under
Linux

Hey Tizen Devs, as you know you can use the Tizen SDK to develop your Tizen apps. Now, the Tizen tools team are happy to announce the release of the latest Tizen SCM Tools. You can find the major changes and known issues below:

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Samsung Powers their SMART Signage Portfolio with Tizen

Filed under
Linux

Samsung Electronics showcased their digital signage and visual display solutions portfolio at the InfoComm 2016 trade show, which was held last month at the Las Vegas Convention Center. InfoComm is the largest annual global conference for the professional AV industry and is expected to welcome more than 40,000 attendees from nearly 110 countries.

A unique feature of these signages is that they are powered by the Tizen Operating System (OS). By utilising the OS the signs are able to be used for advertising, content delivery, and information display management in corporate, hospitality, public, retail and at-home environments.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Google Hacker Donates His $15,000 Bug Bounty Cash Award To Charity

    Google’s leading security engineer Tavis Ormandy recently won a bug bounty challenge run by security solutions firm Bromium and decided to donate the money to charity. Following his gesture, Bromium matched Ormandy’s donation and donated $15,000 to Amnesty International organization.

  • Mozilla Awards $385,000 to Open Source Projects as part of MOSS “Mission Partners” Program

    For many years people with visual impairments and the legally blind have paid a steep price to access the Web on Windows-based computers. The market-leading software for screen readers costs well over $1,000. The high price is a considerable obstacle to keeping the Web open and accessible to all. The NVDA Project has developed an open source screen reader that is free to download and to use, and which works well with Firefox. NVDA aligns with one of the Mozilla Manifesto’s principles: “The Internet is a global public resource that must remain open and accessible.”

  • TOR Project And Security Experts Making A “Hardened” Version Of TOR To Defeat FBI

    The TOR Project is working closely with security researchers to implement a new technique to secure the TOR Browser against the FBI’s de-anonymization exploits. Called “Selfrando”, this technique will fight the FBI’s “Code Reuse” exploits and create a “hardened” version of TOR.

Review of Fedora 24

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

We run out of time to have a play around and do any kind of serious testing of the Boxes application. But we have been reading about it and understand it is a virtual machine package, designed to run sandboxed virtual machines. Yes, similar to Oracle VM VirtualBox. We intend to look more into the Boxes feature a little later down the track. So we will bring you more information on it soon.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • DataBasin - object inspector and updates
    First, the underlying DataBasinKit framework got an important update.
  • In-demand dev skills, understanding licensing, and more open source news
  • Higher ed systems expanding access to open-source materials
    Open-source learning technology is at the core of higher education for institutions that want to reach broader audiences with very strict ideas about how convenient learning should be. But developing these initiatives does not happen quickly or easily. It requires strong leadership in information technology, expertise to determine which solutions work best for a campus, and a financial commitment to making sure the technology is sustainable.
  • Proxmark Pro Proxmark3 Standalone Open Source RFID Tester (video)
    Rysc Corp has unveiled a new open source board in the form of the Proxmark Pro which now offers a true standalone client and RFID test instrument, check out the video below to learn more. The Proxmark Pro will feature an FPGA with 5 times the logic cells of the Proxmark3 and will remove the need to switch between HF and LF bit streams during operation, to use developers.
  • ErupteD Brings Vulkan To The D Programming Language
    The D programming language is just the latest to have support for Vulkan alongside C++, Rust (via Vulkano, if you missed that project), Go, and many other modern languages getting bindings for this Khronos Group high performance graphics API. Should you not be familiar with the D language, see Wikipedia.

Leftovers: Security