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Wednesday, 05 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hardware Freedom: 3D Printing, RasPi and RPi CM3 Module Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 6:34pm
Story Programming: Vala, Perl and Python Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 6:28pm
Story DRM and Proprietary Software Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 6:24pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 6:18pm
Story Mozilla: SameSite, SUMO, Firefox and More Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 5:31pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 5:25pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 5:22pm
Story ExTiX 20.8 Is the First Distro to Let You Try Linux Kernel 5.8, Based on Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 5:10pm
Story Ubuntu 20.10 “Groovy Gorilla” Artwork by Sylvia Ritter Looks Astonishing, Made with Krita Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 5:07pm
Story Red Hat changes certification rules in response to the coronavirus pandemic Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 5:05pm

Linux 5.8 Released

Filed under
Linux

  • Linux 5.8
    So I considered making an rc8 all the way to the last minute, but
    decided it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any
    big looming worries around.
    
    Because despite the merge window having been very large, there really
    hasn't been anything scary going on in the release candidates. Yeah,
    we had some annoying noise with header file dependencies this week,
    but that's not a new annoyance, and it's also not the kind of subtle
    bug that keeps me up at night worrying about it.
    
    It did reinforce how nice it would be if we had some kind of tooling
    support to break nasty header file dependencies automatically, but if
    wishes were horses.. Maybe some day we'll have some kind of SAT-solver
    for symbol dependencies that can handle all our different
    architectures and configurations, but right now it's just a manual
    pain that occasionally bites us.
    
    Anyway..
    
    Aside from silly header file noise, the last week was mostly dominated
    by the networking pull, which accounts for about half of the changes
    (mellanox drivers and selftests stand out, but there's other smaller
    things in there too). Some RCU fixes stand out.
    
    Outside of the networking stuff, it's mostly various small driver
    fixes (gpu, rdma, sound and pinctrl being much of it), and some minor
    architecture noise (arm, x86, powerpc). But it's all fairly small.
    
    So there it is, a shiny new kernel. Give it a whirl before all you
    people start sending me the pull requests for the merge window, which
    I'll start handling tomorrow..
    
                     Linus
    
  • Linus Torvalds Officially Releases the Linux 5.8 Kernel, Now Available for Download

    The Linux 5.8 kernel series has been officially announced by Linus Torvalds.

    [...]

    You can download the Linux 5.8 kernel sources right now from the kernel.org website or using the direct link below. However, please keep in mind that this currently marked as a “mainline” kernel, which means it’s not yet ready for mass deployments or use in production environments.

    You should probably wait for the first point release, Linux kernel 5.8.1, to hit the streets before considering upgrading your kernel packages to the new series. Many of the rolling GNU/Linux distributions like Arch Linux or openSUSE Tumbleweed will probably upgrade to Linux 5.8 in the coming weeks.

  • Linux 5.8 Released With AMD Energy Driver, F2FS LZO-RLE, IBM POWER10 Booting

    Linus Torvalds was debating up to the last minutes today of whether to opt for Linux 5.8-rc8 or go ahead and release Linux 5.8 as stable... He opted for Linux 5.8 splashing down on this historic day.

    Linus wrote in the 5.8 release announcement that despite this cycle being very large, it turned out fairly well and didn't need a 5.8-rc8 release. Though due to some last minute changes, he does dream of having a sort of SAT-solver for symbol dependencies that would work across architectures and configurations for cleaning up the Linux kernel header file dependency mess. But that for now is just a dream.

  • The 5.8 kernel is out

    Linus has released the 5.8 kernel. "So I considered making an rc8 all the way to the last minute, but decided it's not just worth waiting another week when there aren't any big looming worries around." Headline features in this release include: branch target identification and shadow call stacks for the arm64 architecture, the BPF iterator mechanism, inline encryption support in the block layer, the CAP_PERFMON and CAP_BPF capabilities, a generalized kernel event-notification subsystem, the KCSAN data-race detector, and more. As always, see the KernelNewbies 5.8 page for more information.

openSUSE 15.2 Is The Mercedes-Benz of Linux Distributions

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

The openSUSE DVD comes with a large collection of software packages, which include the GNOME, KDE, Xfce, MATE desktops and much more. The installer will allow you to select the desktop environment you want during the installation, beside any other packages you may desire.

[...]

Overall, the openSUSE 15.2 distribution is a good release, as it ever was. We recommend upgrading to the new version or installing it on a fresh hardware if you are willing to transfer to the openSUSE world.

One can also give a word about how awesome the available documentation for openSUSE is; You can search in their wiki, for any information you desire and you’ll probably find it in no time.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why making mistakes makes me a better sysadmin

    I've been a Fedora Linux contributor for a little over a decade now. Fedora has a large community of developers and users, each with a unique set of skills ranging from being a particularly discerning user to being an amazing programmer. I like this because it inspires and motivates me to develop new skills of my own.

    For me, the best way to develop skills has always been to make mistakes. Like, really mess things up. It doesn't really matter what kind of mistake it is because it's less about the mistake itself and more about what I learn in the process of having to dig myself out of whatever hole I managed to get myself into.

    Why mistakes are good

    I remember my first computer mistake. My family's first computer was an Epson laptop that my uncle gave us when he upgraded. It had a blazing fast 10 MHz processor and a carrying handle because it was so heavy. I loved that machine.

    It ran DOS, but it had a text-based menu application to make it a little friendlier for the novice user. Hard Disk Menu had ten "pages," each of which could have ten commands configured. We had a page for games, another for "boring stuff" like word processors and spreadsheets, etc.

    Hard Disk Menu had some other features that, when I got bored of playing the games, I would explore. At some point, I decided that I should make use of the account feature. It didn't change what applications appeared, but it would prevent unauthorized access, sort of. You could just drop to the DOS shell instead, but still, it was a nice try.

    I created accounts for myself, my parents, and my sisters. My parents were a little annoyed, but they humored me. Everything was fine for a while. Then my sister forgot her password. My parents told me to remove the passwords. But without my sister's password, I couldn't remove the password on her account (it was the early 90s, a much simpler time). What to do? What to do?

    For a little while, we kept going with the attempted passwords until one day when I decided I'd try something I hadn't done yet. When I was first creating the accounts, I set a master password. What would happen if I typed the master password in place of my sister's password?

  • DebConf4

    This tshirt is 15 years old and from DebConf4. Again, I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

    DebConf4 was my 2nd DebConf and took place in Porto Alegre, Brasil.

    Like many DebConfs, it was a great opportunity to meet people: I remember sitting in the lobby of the venue and some guy asked me what I did in Debian and I told him about my little involvements and then and asked him what he did, and he told me he wanted to become involved in Debian again, after getting distracted away. His name was Ian Murdock...

    DebConf4 also had a very cool history session in the hallway track (IIRC, but see below) with Bdale Garbee, Ian Jackson and Ian Murdock and with a young student named Biella Coleman busy writing notes.

    That same hallway also saw the kickoff meeting of the Debian Women project, though sadly today http://tinc.debian.net ("there's no cabal") only shows an apache placeholder page and not a picture of that meeting.

    [...]

    Finally, DebConf4 and more importantly FISL, which was really big (5000 people?) and after that, the wizard of OS conference in Berlin (which had a very nice talk about Linux in different places in the world, illustrating the different states of 'first they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win'), made me quit my job at a company supporting Windows- and Linux-setups as I realized I'd better start freelancing with Linux-only jobs. So, once again, my life would have been different if I would not have attended these events!

  • Design game graphics with Digital Making at Home
  • Raspberry Pi Cluster Episode 6 - Turing Pi Review

    So today, I'm wrapping up my Raspberry Pi Cluster series with my thoughts about the Turing Pi that I used to build a 7-node Kubernetes cluster.

  • Three Charged in July 15 Twitter Compromise

    Three individuals have been charged for their alleged roles in the July 15 [attack] on Twitter, an incident that resulted in Twitter profiles for some of the world’s most recognizable celebrities, executives and public figures sending out tweets advertising a bitcoin scam.

  • ‘Mastermind’ Accused of Twitter [Attack] Just Out of High School

    Graham Ivan Clark, 17, allegedly hijacked 130 Twitter accounts as part of a cryptocurrency scam, according to a criminal affidavit filed in Tampa, Florida. The accounts that were [cr]acked included those of former President Barack Obama, Amazon.com Inc. Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos and Tesla Inc. CEO Elon Musk.

Programming: Perl, Python, Java, Fortran and More

Filed under
Development
  • [Perl] Monthly Report - July

    God, the year 2020 seems never ending. I just pray it gets over quickly and we start fresh with new year 2021. Unfortunately we have to wait for another 5 months. In the current situation, anything can happen in this period. Please stay safe and avoid unnecessary human contacts.

    So what was the main attraction of last month?

    Well, quite a few, to begin with, I submitted 12 Pull Requests which is much better than the month before i.e. 9 Pull Requests. I remember there was time when I used to submit at least 50 PR every month. I aim to do at least 1 PR every 2 days i.e. 15 PR every month. Unfortunately I have only managed to do that in January i.e. 22 Pull Requests. I did come close to the target in two months e.g. May (13 Pull Requests) and July (12 Pull Requests). I am going to keep trying hard. Wish me luck.

    I would like to talk about my participation to the Pull Request Club contributions. Ever since I joined i.e. January 2019, I have never missed a single month. As of today, I have submitted 20 Pull Requests to 20 different distributions. Of those 10 have been accepted and merged. There are 9 PR still open and 1 closed without merge. So overall 50% success rate, not a bad attempt so far.

  • How and why I built Machine Learning model to predict tennis table matches results

    First of all I have chosen Python as the language for the project since python provides many libraries and documentations to support with any challengs during this milestone.

  •         

  • Just updated - Optimize Images v1.3.6

    Optimize Images has just been updated to version 1.3.6, a minor but still important release that fixes a few bugs and improves its overall stability. Thank you for using Optimize Images and/or contributing with feature suggestions, bug reports, or pull requests!

  • Java ternary operator

    Ternary operator can be used as the alternative of ‘if-else’ and ‘if-else-if’ statements. It is called a ternary operator because it takes three operands to do any task. If the conditional expression that is used in a ternary statement returns true, then it executes a particular statement; otherwise, it executes another statement. The ‘?’ and ‘:’ symbols are used to define the ternary statement. The ternary operator is better to use for solving a very simple task in place of ‘if’ statement. Different uses of the ternary operator in java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java List Tutorial

    The list is a useful way to store ordered multiple data like an array in Java. But It has many features that do not exist in the array. The list is called an ordered collection, and it is an interface that extends the Collection interface. It cannot create an object like an array, but it implements four classes to use the functionalities of the list. These classes are ArrayList, LinkList, Stack, and Vector. These are defined in the Java Collection Framework. ArrayList and LinkList classes are widely used in Java. The insert, update, delete, and search operations are done in the list based on the index-value like an array. It can store both null and duplicate values. java.util package contains the ‘list’ interface, and it will require to import to use the ‘list’. How the different methods of the ‘list’ can be used in Java are shown in this tutorial.

  • Java switch case statement

    ‘switch-case’ statement can be used as the alternative of ‘if-else-if’ statement where different conditions are defined in different ‘if’ statements. If the first condition returns false, then check the second condition and so on. Defining multiple conditions using this way is a very lengthy process. The same task can be done very simply by using a switch-case statement. It contains different execution parts and executes the statement where the particular value matches with any ‘case’ value. The switch statement can be applied to the various types of primitive data such as int, char, byte, etc. The different uses of switch-case statements in Java are explained in this tutorial.

  • Fortran newsletter: August 2020

    Welcome to the August 2020 edition of the monthly Fortran newsletter. The newsletter comes out on the first calendar day of every month and details Fortran news from the previous month.

  • Which Is The Best WordPress Caching Plugin?

    I’ve talked about how I optimise this site before, but I wanted to do some digging into which is the best WordPress caching plugin. I’ve tested some of the most popular caching plugins available, and decided to write this post with the results.

  • 10 Tips to Defeat Your Fear of Coding

    Why do you fear to code? Is it because you’re afraid to mess up or break something? is it because the technical concepts are confusing for you? is it because of so many overwhelming concepts in programming? Whatever your answer is…but, the most pleasurable thing for a programmer is the moment when they see their code run in the blink of an eye and the magic happens on the screen.

    Coding is intimidating, coding is overwhelming but if anyone defeats the fear of coding then it’s also one of the most enjoyable and fun things to do. Some people who enjoy coding get addicted to it and they start spending hours either trying different programming strategies or building the new applications, or solving some coding-related challenging problems. In this blog, we will discuss the top reasons why people fear of coding and tips to overcome this problem.

  • July 2020: webmail, custom MDA and python framework work

    The issue is that folder pinning is far from being the only thing I want to do with incoming mails at delivery time, and shoving everything in the mda executable is not ideal. I rewrote the MDA to have it handle delivery only and call an API to determine where it should do it, this let me play with a ton of ideas on a custom API server without tweaking the working MDA. At the end of the day, I had incoming mails processed by various text analyzers, attachments automatically extracted and put in an s3 backing store, and mails indexed for fast lookups.

    I will not expand much on how I did this as I think it makes a nice topic for a dedicated article on custom MDA, and fun stuff you can easily do with them to provide some awesome features on your mail setup.

  • Intel ISPC 1.14 Released With Initial GPU Offloading Support

    A few days back we wrote of Intel's ISPC compiler landing GPU code generation support for their UHD/Iris/Xe Graphics from Gen9 Skylake and beyond. Following that code being merged, ISPC 1.14.0 was quickly tagged.

    Intel ISPC 1.14.0 was released shortly after the GPU support code landed for the Implicit SPMD Program Compiler. See more details on the GPU code landing in the aforelinked article. It's an exciting milestone and another great Intel software achievement playing into their oneAPI efforts. ISPC 1.14.0 continues offering great first-rate CPU support across all platforms. All of these open-source goodies remain open-source as one of Intel's continued strong points.

Games: “Reality Check,” Valve's Steam, and Fedora 32

Filed under
Gaming
  • Where Virtual and Augmented Reality Stand in 2020

    “Reality Check,” the new 21-page special report from Variety Intelligence Platform (VIP), explores the hype machine behind virtual and augmented reality, and how investors, particularly in the entertainment space, may have jumped the gun too soon and projected outlandish expectations onto a medium that still has plenty of significant, unexplored potential.

    The initial wave of investments in VR and AR following Facebook’s acquisition of start-up Oculus VR in 2014 was a seemingly great sign for the gaming and tech spaces, with up to an estimated $2.3 billion in funding for VR and AR companies in 2016 (per Digi-Capital).

    But something happened on the way to VR and AR’s happy Hollywood ending.

  • Valve's Steam July 2020 Numbers Point To A Small Dip For Linux

    While some platforms like Netmarketshare have reported increases month-over-month for Linux desktop usage, that doesn't appear to be translating similarly to the Linux gaming market-share, or at least not at the rate Steam is growing on Windows and macOS. Valve has just published their July 2020 numbers that are part of the Steam Survey.

  • Fedora 32 : Play games with Steam service.

    Steam is a video game digital distribution service by Valve. It was launched as a standalone software client in September 2003 as a way for Valve to provide automatic updates for their games, and expanded to include games from third-party publishers., see Wikipedia.

VokoscreenNG Screencasting App 3.0.5 Released (Ubuntu PPA)

Filed under
Software

VokoscreenNG screencasting application 3.0.5 was released a few days ago. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04, and derivatives.

VokoscreenNG is an easy to use screencast creator that can be used to record videos from computers screen, webcams, external cameras, etc. This graphical tool can produce educational videos, live recordings of browser navigation, tutorials of installations, record video conferences, etc.

Read more

Kernel: BPF, Linux 5.9 Overview and Linux Plumbers Conference 2020

Filed under
Linux

  • Facebook Engineer Improving BPF "User Programs" Support

    Facebook engineer Song Liu has sent out a set of patches for "BPF_PROG_TYPE_USER" as a new BPF type for the Linux kernel focused on better supporting user programs. 

    Given the success of the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine and new use-cases continuing to be worked on it outside of the traditional networking scope, Facebook has been working on BPF_PROG_TYPE_USER for better handling of user-space programs within the realm of BPF. (e)BPF has numerous program types for areas of networking and other areas while this new type is for better handling of user programs. 

  • Changes Expected For The Linux 5.9 Kernel From Intel DG1 To AMD Navi 2 To New CPU Capabilities

    The Linux 5.9 kernel merge window will open up immediately upon the release of Linux 5.8, which is expected to happen this evening unless Linus Torvalds decides to stave it off for one week to allow for additional testing. In any case, once Linux 5.9 kicks off there are a lot of changes expected. 

    Based on our monitoring of the various kernel "-next" Git branches in recent weeks and the mailing lists, here is a look at some of the changes slated for the Linux 5.9 kernel. Stay tuned to Phoronix for much more once the Linux 5.9 merge window is underway. 

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: VFIO/IOMMU/PCI Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the VFIO/IOMMU/PCI Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference!

    The PCI interconnect specification, the devices implementing it, and the system IOMMUs providing memory/access control to them are incorporating more and more features aimed at high performance systems (eg PCI ATS (Address Translation Service)/PRI(Page Request Interface), enabling Shared Virtual Addressing (SVA) between devices and CPUs), that require the kernel to coordinate the PCI devices, the IOMMUs they are connected to and the VFIO layer used to manage them (for userspace access and device passthrough) with related kernel interfaces that have to be designed in-sync for all three subsystems.

    The kernel code that enables these new system features requires coordination between VFIO/IOMMU/PCI subsystems, so that kernel interfaces and userspace APIs can be designed in a clean way.

Latte Dock v0.10~ | July Update

Filed under
KDE

Thanks to Martijn Vogelaar a new visibility mode for sidebars is supported. The new mode triggers Latte panel showing/hiding through the Latte Sidebar Button applet and global shortcuts but at the same time if the panel does not contain mouse for a period of time (can be set from Show timer) then it auto hides itself.

Visibility modes in general have updated their organization in order to be grouped much better. Currently they look like...

Read more

Kate - User Feedback - August 2020

Filed under
KDE

Starting with the 20.04 release, Kate allows the user to turn on some telemetry submission. This is a purely opt-in approach. We do not submit any data if you not actively enable this feature! For details about the introduction of this feature, see this post.

After some months of having this out in the wild, I think it is time to show up with the first data we got.

Read more

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Release Candidate ISOs Are Now Ready for Public Testing

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS is the first (of many to come) point releases in the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system series, which is a long-term supported release that will receive updates for up to 10 years.

Initially set to hit the streets on July 23rd, the first point release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS was delayed for August 6th, 2020. Canonical gave us no reason for the delay, but looking at what happened recently with the BootHole vulnerability found in the GRUB2 bootloader I guess we all know the real reason.

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS isn’t a major update to the Focal Fossa series. It’s just an updated installation media, which will most likely help newcomers or those who want to deploy Ubuntu 20.04 LTS on new computer, as well as those who want to reinstall their systems, as they won’t have to patch the installations against BootHole, nor download hundreds of updates after the installation.

Read more

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Verbose regular expressions, now you have one and a bit problems

    Regular expressions (regexes) are famously hard to read or write. There are some techniques you can use to improve this. Like any other code you write, your regular expression patterns should

    include comments

    break apart large blocks into smaller related sections

    use named variables and identifiers

  • Talk Python to Me: #275 Beautiful Pythonic Refactorings

    Do you obsess about writing your code just the right way before you get started? Maybe you have some ugly code on your hands and you need to make it better. Either way, refactoring could be your ticket to happier days! On this episode, we'll talk through a powerful example of iteratively refactoring some code until we eventually turn our ugly duckling into a Pythonic beauty.

  • Python Monthly July 2020

    Being a Python developer is a fantastic career option. Python is now the most popular language with lots of growing job demand (especially in the fields of Web, Data Science and Machine Learning). You have many job opportunities, you can work around the world, and you get to solve hard problems. One thing that is hard, however, is staying up to date with the constantly evolving ecosystem. You want to be a top-performing python developer, coder, programmer, software developer, but you don’t have time to select from hundreds of articles, videos and podcasts each day.

    This monthly newsletter is focused on keeping you up to date with the industry, keeping your skills sharp, without wasting your valuable time. I will be sharing the most important articles, podcasts and videos of the month. Think Tim Ferriss and the Pareto Principle (80/20 rule) meeting the Software Development world. What’s the 20% that will get you 80% of the results?

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: [Week 9] Check-in

Fedora 33: New Features and Changes, Release Dates

Filed under
News

Fedora 33 is the next installment of the Fedora Linux operating system for the desktop workstation, servers, and all of its spins.
Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Noodlings | Designing, Replacing and Configuring

    I’d like to say something interesting about the number 17, it’s a prime number, the last year you are a minor in the United States, perhaps other places… Team 17 was a great video game house in the 90s that made the game Worms, that was cool. Played that quite a lot some years back…

  • GNU World Order 365

    The Korn shell. shasum -a256=2e667ae8289eb0d704b5953d95d24b9036bf52ad72b33f30669913f35b063ede

  • Linux Distros Used BootHole Vulnerability Patches.. To Destroy the Boot

    BootHole is a newly discovered security vulnerability that affects Linux systems using UEFI Secure Boot feature. The vulnerability allows full root access once exploited in the host system.

  • Linux users, beware: TrickBot malware is no longer Windows-exclusive [Ed: This is a threat only when a system is already compromised]
  • [Old] What a Counterfeit Lightning to Headphone Adapter Looks Like

    I’d previously seen bad fakes online – usually, there are very obvious physical tells that the product isn’t genuine such as size, OEM-style packaging or markings. In this case, almost everything superficially appeared right until you look closer. I’d purchased from a seller on eBay (I know, I know…) with lots of positive feedback and assurances in the listing that it was genuine for £6. The price was the most obvious warning sign – a genuine part is £10. For more and more products these days I’d stick to buying from big-box retailers where there is more stringent sourcing, or straight from the manufacturer.

  • The Dollars And Sense Of Nvidia Paying A Fortune For Arm

    Back in April, when we were talking with Nvidia co-founder and chief executive officer Jensen Huang about the datacenter being the new unit of compute, we explained that we were always disappointed with the fact that Nvidia did not bring its “Denver” hybrid Arm CPU and Nvidia GPU, previewed way back in January 2011, to market, and said further we really wanted Nvidia to redefine what a CPU is by breaking its memory and I/O truly free from its compute.

    What we didn’t say in all of this that Nvidia should try to buy Arm Holdings, the company the creates and licenses the Arm embedded, client, and server chip instruction set, architectures, and reference designs. But if the rumor mill is right, then Nvidia is pondering just that.

    This opportunity is only coming about because SoftBank Group, the Japanese conglomerate founded by and for the moment controlled by Masayoshi Son, is being hammered by some bad investments – particularly the We Work office renting boondoggle – at the same time that the coronavirus pandemic hit. In March of this year, SoftBank announced it was selling of $41 billion in assets to clean up its balance sheet and to fund share buybacks to keep its investors from revolting. Softbank has a 24 percent stake in T-Mobile, a 29.5 percent stake in Alibaba, and a 48.2 percent stake in Yahoo Japan that it probably wants to keep, and letting go of Arm Holdings, which it paid a whopping $32 billion to take control of four years ago this month, is probably not something that Son, who wants us all to join The Singularity with him and create the technologies to do it, relishes. But, for those of us who want no part of such nonsense, hooray! Make Son’s licensing very expensive, please.

  • What's Next for the ADA?

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) celebrated its 30th birthday this July. Three decades ago, the ADA represented a huge step forward for the rights of people with disabilities. In 2020, I think it’s time to advance even further.

  • Daniel Stenberg: HTTP/3 logo

    Simply because it is so hard to find this resource by googling it.

Debian Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2020

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in July 2020

    This was my 17th month of contributing to Debian. I became a DM in late March last year and a DD last Christmas! \o/

    Well, this month I didn’t do a lot of Debian stuff, like I usually do, however, I did a lot of things related to Debian (indirectly via GSoC)!

  • DebConf3

    This tshirt is 17 years old and from DebConf3. I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

    DebConf3 was my first DebConf and took place in Oslo, Norway, in 2003. I was very happy to be invited, like any Debian contributor at that time, and that Debian would provide food and accomodation for everyone. Accomodation was sleeping on the floor in some classrooms of an empty school and I remember having tasted grasshoppers provided by a friendly Gunnar Wolf there, standing in line on the first day with the SSH maintainer (OMG!1 (and it wasn't Colin back then!)) and meeting the one Debian person I had actually worked with before: Thomas Lange or MrFAI. In Oslo I also was exposed to Skolelinux / Debian Edu for the first time, saw a certain presentation from the FTP masters and also noticed some people recording the talks, though as I learned later these videos were never released to the public. And there was this fiveteen year old called Toresbe, who powered on the PDP's which were double his age. And then actually made use of them. And and and.

  • Sparky news 2020/07

    The 7th monthly report of 2020 of the Sparky project:

    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.7.11 & 5.8-rc7
    • added new desktop: NsCDE
    • added to repo: Shutter-Encoder, Lite Editor, Sparky APTus AppCenter
    • Sparky 5.12 Nibiru of the stable line released
    • riot-desktop package changed its name to element-desktop

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Plumbers Conference and Kernel Developments in METRICFS, FS-Cache, HWMON

  • Application Ecosystem Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Application Ecosystem Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! The Linux kernel is the foundation of the Linux systems, but it is not much use without applications that run on top of it. The application experience relies on the kernel for performance, stability and responsiveness. Plumbers is the perfect venue to have the kernel and app ecosystems under one roof to discuss and learn together and make a better application experience on the Linux platform.

  • Google Opens Patches For "METRICFS" That They Have Used Since 2012 For Telemetry Data

    The METRICFS file-system has been in use internally at Google since 2012 for exporting system statistics to their telemetry systems with around 200 statistics being exported per machine. They are now posting the METRICFS patches as open-source for review and possible upstreaming. A "request for comments" on METRICFS was sent out today on the Linux kernel mailing list. Their motives for now finally publishing these patches is as a result of the recent Statsfs proposal by a Red Hat engineer for a RAM-based file-system for exposing kernel statistics to user-space. METRICFS has a similar aim to Statsfs.

  • FS-Cache Rewritten But Even Its Developers Are Hesitant About Landing It For Linux 5.9

    FS-Cache provides the Linux kernel with a general purpose cache for network file-systems like NFS and AFS but also other special use-cases like ISO9660 file-systems. FS-Cache has been rewritten for better performance and reliability, among other benefits, and while it has been sent in as a pull request for Linux 5.9 even its own developers provide some caution over landing it this cycle. FS-Cache has seen work to "massively overhaul" it with a variety of improvements. The new and improved FS-Cache will now use async direct I/O in place of snooping for updated pages that in turn means less virtual memory overhead. The new FS-Cache implementation has simpler object management, changes to object invalidation, and a variety of other work.

  • Corsair Commander Pro Driver Sent In To Linux 5.9

    The hardware monitoring (HWMON) subsystem has a new driver that is likely to excite some enthusiasts wanting greater control over thermal monitoring and fan control for their systems. The previously covered Corsair Commander Pro Linux driver is now coming with Linux 5.9. The Commander Pro offers six 4-pin fan ports with PWM controls, two RGB LED channels, and four thermal sensors. An interested user/developer created this Linux driver without the support from Corsair. The thermal and fan control support is in place with this new HWMON driver while the RGB lighting controls are available from OpenRGB.

Graphics: Mesa 20.1.5, Intel and AMD

  • mesa 20.1.5
    Hi all,
    
    I'd like to announce Mesa 20.1.5, the fifth bugfix release for the 20.1 branch.
    
    The next bugfix release is planned for 2 weeks from now, on 2020-08-19.
    
    Cheers,
    Eric
    
    
  • Mesa 20.1.5 Released For The Latest Stable Open-Source Vulkan / OpenGL Drivers

    Mesa 20.1.5 provides the latest stable open-source Vulkan/OpenGL graphics drivers for the Linux desktop as the newest bi-weekly milestone. Mesa 20.2 remains under development as this quarter's feature release due out in about one month's time. Mesa 20.2 is running behind schedule as it should have been branched around the end of July but has yet to happen. In any case, more Mesa 20.2 feature work continues to land and more than likely will ship sometime in September. But until that occurs, Mesa 20.1 is the latest stable series.

  • Intel Workaround For Graphics Driver Regression: "The Platform Problem Going Crazy"

    Sent out over the weekend was a patch series for the Intel Linux kernel graphics driver entitled "Time, where did it go?" This set of 42 patches aims to provide incremental improvements to the driver to offset a performance regression in Linux 5.7 that Intel hasn't been able to track down. This increased complication of the driver to offset the regression is now under the microscope. The set of 42 patches by longtime Intel open-source developer Chris Wilson provides incremental improvements to reduce the execution latency. He was upfront that the intent of these improvements are to "basically offsets the small regressions incurred when compared to [Linux kernel] 5.7."

  • RadeonSI Resorts To Disabling SDMA For GFX9/Vega Due To APU Issues

    AMD's RadeonSI Gallium3D driver has resorted to disabling SDMA (System DMA) async DMA engine support for all GFX9/Vega hardware due to issues plaguing some APUs. While SDMA has the potential of helping performance, GFX9 (Vega) is now seeing the support disabled due to bugs seeming to only affect APUs. Though it's not entirely surprising as the open-source AMD Radeon Linux driver also is not enabling SDMA at this point for GFX8 (Polaris) or GFX10 (Navi) hardware either. Opened three months ago was the merge request for disabling SDMA on GFX9 and to back-port it to the stable series as well. Longtime AMD open-source developer Marek Olsak noted, "This is somewhat a radical step. All opinions welcome."

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, CrowPi and Linux Headlines

           
  • Destination Linux 185: Let’s Fix Linux Tech Support

    On this week’s episode of Destination Linux, we’re transitioning from the topic of Bug Reporting last week to Tech Support in Linux this week. We’re going to check in on Wayland’s progress with Plasma’s new release, we have an sandbox MMO for gaming, and our popular tips/tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more, coming up right now on Destination Linux.

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  • FLOSS Weekly 590: Rensselaer Center for Open Software - A Community of Open Source Developers

    RCOS is a group of RPI students who work on open-source projects. The goal of RCOS is to empower students to develop open-source solutions to real-world problems. They have created 300+ open source projects over the years. Doc Searls and Simon Phipps talk with Wes Turner, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and the Director of the Rensselaer Center for Open Source. They discuss teaching open source and the hardships that come along with that, especially with e-learning. They also discuss what the future could look like if we could have more open-source programs like RCOS in other universities.

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  • The Best Raspberry Pi Laptop Kit | CrowPi 2 Review

    The Best Raspberry Pi Laptop Kit | CrowPi 2 Review of the kit, usage, and examples. 

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  • 2020-08-05 | Linux Headlines

    LibreOffice 7 dodges its rebranding controversy, the Pinta bitmap editor sees its first new version in 5 years, Red Hat accommodates certification seekers with new pandemic-friendly rules, and ownCloud 10.5 brings background sync changes to the platform.

Gaming on Linux in 2020: Way Better Than You Think

Linux has always been seen as a rather rigid operating system for gaming. Many games used to be unavailable on Linux, and the ones that you could play used to have all sorts of bugs. However, the situation’s not the same anymore with Ubuntu 20.04. The OS is way better for gaming than you may think. In certain situations, games even run better on Linux than on Windows. This is quite impressive so let’s see what lead to Linux’s improvements. Read more Also: Narrative-driven adventure Impostor Factory has new teaser trailer