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Monday, 26 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 8:48pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 8:31pm
Story Videos About GNU/Linux and Free Software Roy Schestowitz 1 25/10/2020 - 5:52pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 5:40pm
Story Seeed offers PCB assembly discounts for RPi CM4 boards and teases CM4 carrier Rianne Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 5:33pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 3:53pm
Story Kodi 18.9 Released with HTTP Access Workaround [PPA] Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 3:26pm
Story Linux Weekly Roundup: Edge for Linux, Ubuntu Groovy Release, KDE Plasma 5.20.1 and more arindam1989 25/10/2020 - 12:18pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 10:40am
Story GNU Taler news: RFC 8905 - "The 'payto' URI Scheme for Payments" published Roy Schestowitz 25/10/2020 - 10:02am

EU Open Source Policy: good analysis, missing concrete next steps

Filed under
OSS

After the Commission's previous Open Source Strategy expired in 2017, we have waited three years for a new one. Instead of the hoped-for major step, which would reflect current developments around the debates on digital sovereignty and state of the art administration, the Commission has presented only a fig leaf. The benefits of Free Software are fully emphasised and the Commission is ambitious in its future use of Free Software. But concrete goals are rare, and a clear commitment to the use of Free Software is lacking. A failure of the strategy is foreseeable at this stage as the objectives are ambitious but the measures merely establish the status quo. Therefore, we call upon the Commission to present and implement concrete measures and activities in the coming weeks and months.

Read more

GNOME: Transparency, GNOME Asia and Gedit

Filed under
GNOME
  • Molly de Blanc: Endorsements

    This transparency could mean many things, though it most frequently refers to the technology itself: the code or, in the case of hardware, the designs. We could also apply it to the overall architecture of a system. We could think about the decision making, practices, and policies of whomever is designing and/or making the technology. These are all valuable in some of the same ways, including that they allow us to make a conscious choice about what we are supporting.

    When we choose to use a piece of technology, we are supporting those who produce it. This could be because we are directly paying for it, however our support is not limited to direct financial contributions. In some cases this is because of things hidden within a technology: tracking mechanisms or backdoors that could allow companies or governments access to what we’re doing. When creating different types of files on a computer, these files can contain metadata that says what software was used to make it. This is an implicit endorsement, and you can also explicitly endorse a technology by talking about that or how you use it. In this, you have a right (not just a duty) to be aware of what you’re supporting. This includes, for example, organizational practices and whether a given company relies on abusive labor policies, indentured servitude, or slave labor.

    [...]

    Not only does this empower those making choices about what technologies to use, but it empowers others down the line, who rely on those choices. It also respects the people involved in the processes of making these technologies. By acknowledging their role in bringing our tools to life, we are respecting their labor. By holding companies accountable for their practices and policies, we are respecting their lives.

  • Molly de Blanc: GNOME Asia 2020 Registrations Are Open

    Topics covered include the GNOME desktop and a range of other topics that are GNOME specific and general to the free software and tech communities. The summit brings together the GNOME community in Asia to provide a place for users, developers, leaders, governments and businesses to discuss present technology and future developments.

  • gedit and around

    (( As a small interlude, I've assembled a page with my statistics about my GNOME contributions (number of git commits in the different modules). Numbers can tell a story, and the story is probably useful for the gedit crowdfunding Wink )).

    I write this blog post to talk more about gedit, its philosophy for the user experience (the external aspects) and trends in its code development (the internals). I will also relate on an improvement to a plugin, to allow new use-cases. To finish with a list of possible topics to talk about the next time: other recent work already done (or in progress), the future work that will be done, and some other future possible tasks (if time permits); heh, this is an endless software project after all, like many.

    [...]

    If you count the check-boxes, it's the same number before and after. But with the new preferences, it's more powerful! Before, the configuration was a list (a set of flags). Now, it is a two-dimensional matrix (a table), with the whitespace character type on one dimension and its location in the text on the other dimension. Note that the way this is presented to the user doesn't look like a matrix or table, it has been a little abstracted away.

    New use-cases that are now possible: basically, draw only unwanted whitespaces. Examples of unwanted whitespaces: all kinds of trailing spaces on a line (git doesn't like them), plus possibly tabulations if the indentation/alignment needs to be done with spaces. Note that such a configuration still allows the non-breaking spaces to be drawn at all locations, to distinguish them from normal spaces (since everybody will agree that this is a good thing, there is no configuration for it, it is always enabled when the plugin is enabled).

    This functionality is easily available to other applications, I've implemented the new preferences widget in the Tepl library. The drawing of the little symbols in the text area is implemented in GtkSourceView, where I've implemented the new API with the matrix several years ago.

How to Upgrade Ubuntu 20.04 to 20.10 (Focal Fossa to Groovy Gorilla)

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 20.10 is available to download now. Here are the steps on how to upgrade your current Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Focal Fossa to Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla.
Read more

Games: Civilization VI, Don't Starve Together, Ziggurat 2 and GONNER2

Filed under
Gaming
  • Ahoy, Me Hearties! Civilization VI's free Pirates game mode is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Fancy sailing the seas and becoming king of the pirates? We're not talking about One Piece but Civilization VI with the latest major free update out now.

    Inspired by the classic Sid Meier's Pirates!, this freshly included game mode sees 1-4 players take on the role of a Pirate King. Across 60 turns, each player will go around pillaging cities, ships, build a big fleet, collect Relics to power up and attempt to become the true king. You lose by having nothing left, you win by having the most points at the end. It totally changes the gameplay, much like the Red Death battle royale mode did.

    You're not alone either with four AI civilizations (Spain, Netherlands, England, and France) fighting to control the map, as well as Buccaneers, this scenario's version of Barbarians.

  • Don't Starve Together gets a brand new biome and an animated short | GamingOnLinux

    Klei Entertainment continue expanding their incredible looking survival game Don't Starve Together, with the Return of Them: Forgotten Knowledge update out now along with a Halloween event.

    This is the online version of Don't Starve that you can play with friends, and it's been going through something of an evolution. Return of Them is a series of big updates, each expanding the game in different ways and Return of Them: Forgotten Knowledge continues that trend.

  • First-person magic-shooting rogue-lite 'Ziggurat 2' enters Early Access | GamingOnLinux

    Ziggurat 2 from Milkstone Studios has arrived in Early Access, letting you jump into the shoes of a mage and blast through some freaky creatures with all sorts of wands and staffs in gorgeous first-person action. What's awesome is how Milkstone decided to support Linux right away too, so we have it from day-1.

    If you've not played the original, fear not as you don't need to. It's a firmly standalone game, and thanks to the mechanics and progression it's real easy to get into and enjoy. Exactly like the original, it's a first-person dungeon crawling rogue-lite FPS that relies on speed and skill to progress through various rooms of enemies.

    The story here is that the Ziggurat housed various dangerous creatures, some of which couldn't be destroyed so they were locked away. The Ziggurat was mostly destroyed during some sort of civil war between mages, and so tons of these creatures escaped. It's up to you to travel around and deal with them as best you can across various quests.

  • Try not to lose your head in a world full of colour in GONNER2 out now | GamingOnLinux

    In motion, GONNER2 is almost mesmerising in how the world flows around with colourful tiles flowing in and connecting up that follows your movements. Honestly, the design work alone on it totally deserves an award. Gameplay though? Well, it's a rather challenging platformer with roguelike elements, where you play as the "largely misunderstood and altruistic Ikk". It's absolutely hectic, quite confusing initially as it dumps you into the world but you soon get the hang of it thanks to the simple to grasp controls.

    GONNER2 rewards speed. Go fast, shoot fast, take down as many enemies as you can in a short space of time and keep on jumping and running while trying not to lose your head. You build up a combination as you keep on taking enemies down, which will boost up your score.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Toggling Line Numbers On/Off in the vi Text Editor – Linux Hint

    The line numbers shown in a text editor can greatly enhance a programmer’s experience writing and reading code. There are several text editors available for the Linux operating system, including the popular and powerful vi text editor, and these editors can be used to create and modify various file types.
    The vi editor provides three different types of line numbers: absolute, relative, and a hybrid combining features of absolute and relative. In this article, we will discuss method that can be used to change the line number type shown in the vi text editor.

    Note: Linux Mint 20 is used to demonstrate all the methods discussed below.

  • How to Configure Network Static IP Address on RHEL/CentOS 8/7

    The scope of this tutorial is to explain how we can edit and make changes to Network Configurations on RHEL/CentOS 8/7 from the command line only, and, more specifically how we can set up a Static IP address on network interfaces using system network-scripts, which is a must be configured to serve Internet-facing network services, and how to configure or change RHEL/CentOS system hostname.

  • Ansible file Module – Tutorial and Examples - LinuxBuz

    Ansible file module is used to deal with the files, directories, and symlinks. You can create or remove files, symlinks or directories on the remote hosts using the Ansible file module. It is also used to change the file ownership, group and permissions.

    Ansible file module performs all tasks on the remote hosts. So before changing the ownership and permissions of the files and directories, relevant user and group must exist on the remote hosts. Otherwise, playbook execution will fail. In this case, you should always check the user or group’s existence on the remote hosts then change the ownership or permissions.

  • Linux interface analytics on-demand with iftop | Enable Sysadmin

    Got network bandwidth? Are you sure? Find out with iftop.

  • GCP Quickstart Guide for OpenShift OKD - A Random Walk Down Tech Street

    I recently did a blog post series. showing how to get started with OpenShift OKD on Fedora CoreOS for DigitalOcean. For that series I wrote a script to do most of the heavy lifting because DigitalOcean isn’t a native supported platform by the OpenShift installer.
    Today I’ll show off how to get started in GCP, which is supported natively by the OpenShift installer. This makes it much easier to get started because most of the heavy lifting (including infrastructure bringup) is done by the installer itself.
    As always, when looking for more information in addition to what I’m showing here today refer to the existing documentation.

  • How to Install Jenkins Automation Server with Apache on Ubuntu 20.04

    Jenkins is a free and open-source automation server that helps developers to build, test, and deploy their software. It is based on Java and provides over 1700 plugins that help to automate the repetitive tasks involved in the software development process. It supports multiple operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, and can easily be distributed across multiple machines.

  • How to install MySQL server on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux - nixCraft

    Explains how to install and set up Oracle MySQL server 8.x on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux, including new users and databases for your project.

  • How To Create A Custom Ubuntu Live ISO Image With Cubic - OSTechNix

    In this guide, we are going to learn what is Cubic and how to create a custom Ubuntu live ISO image with Cubic application.

  • Enabling new hardware on Raspberry Pi with Device Tree Overlays - Bootlin's blog

    We recently had the chance to work on a customer project that involved the RaspberryPi Compute Module 3, with custom peripherals attached: a Microchip WILC1000 WiFi chip connected on SDIO, and a SGTL5000 audio codec connected over I2S/I2C. We take this opportunity to share some insights on how to introduce new hardware support on RaspberryPi platforms, by taking advantage of the Raspberry Pi specific Device Tree overlay mechanism.

Devices/Embedded: ClearFog, Turing Pi 2, RasPi and Arduino

Filed under
Hardware

  • ClearFog CX CN9K Mini-ITX 10GbE/5GbE networking SBC runs Linux or FreeBSD

    Last year, SolidRun introduced ClearFog CX LX2X networking single board computer offering up to 100GbE via NXP LX2160A 16-core Cortex-A72 communication processor that followed ClearFog CX 8K  ARMADA 8040 networking board launched the year before.

    The Israeli company is now working on two ClearFog CX CN9K networking SBC’s powered by CEx7 CN913x system-on-module featuring Marvell Octeon TX2 CN913x quad-core Cortex-A72 processor and offering multi-gigabit Ethernet with various 10Gbps, 5Gbps, and Gigabit Ethernet ports.

  •                

  • Turing Pi 2 announcemen

                       

    Today we are thrilled to announce the Turing Pi V2. We’ve been collecting a massive amount of information, synthesizing all of it in product variations, and thinking about what steps we should do next. Today we are going to announce only some of the fundamental details about the V2. We are still working on checking some of the hypotheses, but believe me, the other parts of the announcement will be exciting too. We will disclose more closer to opening orders.

                      After we released the original 7 nodes Turing Pi, we had many questions. What to do next, how to increase the product’s value, what compute modules to choose, how many nodes, etc. We decided to determine the minimal cluster block size with options to connect hard drives and extension boards. The cluster block should be a self-sustained base node and with ample scope of scale. Next, we wanted the minimum cluster blocks to have an option to connect and form cluster federations and, at the same time, be cost-efficient and easy to scale. The speed of scale should be higher than connecting regular computers on the network and cheaper than the typical server hardware. Another thing, the minimum cluster units should be compact enough, mobile, energy-efficient, cost-effective, and easy to maintain. This is one of the key differences between server racks and everything related to them. 
                         

  • Turing Pi 2

                     

                       

    Turing Pi is a compact ARM cluster that provides a secure and scalable compute in the edge. It is designed to make web-scale edge computing easier for developers. Turing Pi cluster architecture allows you to migrate and sync web apps with minimal friction. It provides you with complete control of the edge infrastructure and improves reliability.

  • New Chair and Trustees of the Raspberry Pi Foundation

             

  • Arduino Blog » Upgrade your flight sim setup with Tom Stanton’s floor-mounted joystick

    Most joysticks sit on your desktop, allowing you to control flight sims and other such games with a bit more realism than a keyboard and mouse. YouTuber Tom Stanton, however, decided to take things to the next level by creating one that pivots from the floor out of aluminum extrusion and 3D-printed parts.

Uncovering the Best Open Source Google Analytics Alternatives

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web

Web analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of internet data. In a nutshell, it is the study of website visitor behavior. It is the process of using online data to transform a organization from faith-based to data driven.

This type of software helps you generate a holistic view of your business by turning customer interactions into actionable insights. Using reports and dashboards, web analytics software lets you sort, sift and share real-time information to help identify opportunities and issues. Keeping track of web visitors, analyzing traffic sources, measuring sales and conversions are just some of the possibilities.

Google Analytics is an excellent well known free service that lets webmasters and site owners access web analytics data. The web service generates detailed statistics about a website’s traffic and sources. It helps marketers and is the most widely used website statistics service. But the biggest downside with Google Analytics is that your data is controlled and used for Google’s own purposes, not just by you. It is also not an open source solution, with a webmaster or site owner being denied access to the raw data.

There are also many other remote-hosted web analytics services that are well-designed and comprehensive. However, if you want an open source solution where the software is hosted on your own server, there are some good alternatives. Having the software installed on your server means that you retain full control over your data, with the possibility of integrating that data into your own system. This solution might, for example, be important to people who do not want to give Google (or another organization) the invitation to control a large portion of their online activity, or who want to be fully in control of visitor privacy.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled the following list of open source web analytics software.

Read more

Also: ITFirms Lists Top Free, Open-Source Statistical Analysis Software

Games: Roguelike, Bleed Pixels, Quadrilateral Cowboy, and Stadia

Filed under
Gaming
  • Rogue, the original Roguelike from 1980, is now available on Steam | PC Gamer

    "Roguelike" is a well-known genre of videogame: Spelunky 2, Noita, Hades, Demons Ate My Neighbors, Caves of Qud, Stoneshard, and Atomicrops are all relatively recent examples. But have you ever wondered where the name actually originated—or more to the point, wished you had a chance to actually play the ancient progenitor that started it all? Now you can, and on Steam no less, thanks to today's launch of the original Rogue, developed by Epyx and released all the way back in 1980.

  • The big tech upgrade for They Bleed Pixels is now out everywhere | GamingOnLinux

    They Bleed Pixels, a fiendishly difficult action platformer inspired by H.P. Lovecraft and classic horror recently released on the Nintendo Switch which gave the PC version a nice tech upgrade too.

    While technically this has been out for a while, as the itch.io release of They Bleed Pixels back in June had all the upgrades it wasn't updated everywhere else. As of this week though, it's now live on Steam too. Much like the recent 64bit upgrade to Quadrilateral Cowboy, this tech upgrade was done by game porter Ethan Lee.

    So what's new? Much improved and expanded gamepad support including hot-plugging, additional pad support, PS4 and Switch glyphs are now supported and the icons will correctly switch on-screen, the cut-scenes have been improved to fade properly, 64bit support Linux and macOS, checkpoint save/load optimizations and plenty of bug fixes.

  • Cyberpunk adventure Quadrilateral Cowboy goes 64bit on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    The weekend is just about here and if you're stuck for something to do, why not try out the cyberpunk adventure Quadrilateral Cowboy with the latest update.

    "Quadrilateral Cowboy is a single-player adventure in a cyberpunk world. Tread lightly through security systems with your hacking deck and grey-market equipment. With top-of-the-line hardware like this, it means just one thing: you answer only to the highest bidder."

    [...]

    Wonderful to see more Linux games get updated to continue working far into the future with all that 64bit goodness. Ports done by Ethan Lee are always great.

  • According to a Stadia developer, streamers should be paying publishers and it backfired | GamingOnLinux

    After a three day event to show off new games for Stadia, along with three special demos now live you would think Google was having a good time. Unfortunately for them, one developer derailed it all.

    For a quick recap of the Stadia event you can see day 1 here with PAC-MAN Mega Tunnel Battle, day 2 here with the HUMANKIND demo and as for day 3: you can now play a free demo of the upcoming Immortals Fenyx Rising free, they announced a new exclusive 'First on Stadia' title Young Souls and the strategy game Phoenix Point is coming to Stadia in 2021. Additionally, they expanded their invite system so that if you do invite a friend to Stadia, they will get two months of Stadia Pro free and if they continue with it you then get a month free too. See the Stadia community post for all the info on that.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Free XSS Tools – Linux Hint

    Cross-Site Scripting, commonly known as XSS, is a type of vulnerability in which attackers remotely inject custom scripts on web pages. It commonly occurs in sites where data input parameters are improperly sanitized.

    Sanitization of inputs is the process of cleansing of the inputs, so the data inserted is not used to find or exploit security holes in a website or server.

    Vulnerable sites are either unsanitized or very poorly and incompletely sanitized. It is an indirect attack. The payload is indirectly sent to the victim. The malicious code is inserted on the website by the attacker, and then it becomes a part of it. Whenever the user (victim) visits the webpage, the malicious code is moved to the browser. Hence, the user is unaware of anything happening.

  • Google Chrome Update for Windows, Mac, Linux Fixes Critical Zero-Day Bug | Technology News

    Google Chrome stable channel users are receiving an update that rings along multiple security fixes. Update v86.0.4240.111 includes a fix for zero-day vulnerability CVE-2020-15999 discovered by a member in Google's Project Zero team. This new zero-day vulnerability is reported to be a memory bug in the FreeType font rendering library. This was spotted being abused by a threat actor. Chrome users are recommended to install this latest update by going into the Help section.

    The tech giant has confirmed via a blog post that it has updated the Chrome stable channel to 86.0.4240.111 for Windows, Mac, and Linux users. This update will roll out for all users in the coming week. Chrome users can update to the latest version via the integrated update function inside the browser itself. Hit the three dots on the top right corner of the browser window and select Help > About Google Chrome. Here it will show you of any pending update, and after installation, it will ask you to relaunch the browser to finish the updating process.

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 218 – The past was a terrible place

    Josh and Kurt talk about change. Specifically we discuss how the past was a terrible place. Never believe anyone who tells you it was better. Part of a career now is learning how to learn. The things you learn today won’t be useful skills in a few years. The future is is always better than the past. Even in 2020.

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 219 – Chat with Larry Cashdollar

    Josh and Kurt have a chat with Larry Cashdollar. The three of us go way back. Larry has done some amazing things and he tells us all about it!

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 220 – Securing network time and IoT

    Josh and Kurt talk about Network Time Security (NTS) how it works and what it means for the world (probably not very much). We also talk about Singapore’s Cybersecurity Labelling Scheme (CLS). It probably won’t do a lot in the short term, but we hope it’s a beacon of hope for the future.

Linux Candy: Hollywood – fill your console with Hollywood melodrama technobabble

Filed under
Software

Linux Candy is a series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We only feature open source software in this series.

Some of the programs in this series are purely cosmetic, frivolous pieces of fun. Candy at their finest. But we also include some programs that aren’t purely decorative.

There’s a diverse range of programs included in this series. Programs such as eDEX-UI and Variety are actually highly practical programs. ASCIIQuarium has soothing and relaxing qualities for your desktop. Other programs included in this series (such as lolcat, cacafire) are included purely for their decorative qualities. And then there’s some really fun software that just raises a smile or two.

Hollywood is a 102 line script that occupies your console with tech geekery.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Open Source Defies Conflicts of Interest: Red Hat Tells All

    Only two parts of the guidelines state any sort of limit on company associates, she clarified. The first is that projects use an Open Source Initiative-approved license. The second is that if an associate is asked to sign a third-party contributor agreement, they should check with Red Hat’s legal team.

  • Red Hat’s Paul Cormier On How Partners Win The Hybrid Cloud
  • ANZ moves internet banking to Red Hat OpenShift

    The Australia and New Zealand Banking Corporation (ANZ) in October last year turned to Red Hat for help to bring its internet banking proof of concept to life.

    The bank wanted to modernise its internet banking platform that had passed its end of life and required extended support for some years. Deciding on a Red Hat OpenShift platform, tech area lead for ANZ's digital arm Raghavendra Bhat said the bank wanted to not constrain itself to a cloud-only solution.

    ANZ has now migrated 30% of its traffic to the platform and within the first hour of go-live, it processed around AU$2.9 billion worth of payments.

    Speaking with media on Wednesday, Bhat said the bank's expectation is to complete about 80% of the traffic transition onto the new platform by November, with complete transition by March. He said there has been no "cookie-cutter approach" for how it has lifted and shifted the old system onto the new one.

  • Juggling Ansible, OpenShift and K8s? This is for you: Red Hat couples automation to cluster management

    Red Hat is integrating its Ansible automation platform and Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes.

    “We've known people use Ansible and OpenShift and Kubernetes together for years,” Red Hat senior manager Richard Henshall told The Register. “But here we get a bona fide integration between the two.” Typical uses would be to automate deploying system updates, configuring load balancers, or scaling server resources.

    The integration is in technical preview. “We’ve got the initial plumbing working, so it’s exposed through Advanced Cluster Management (ACM),” said Henshall, referring to the company’s tool for controlling OpenShift clusters and applications.

  • About me and my life ...: Fedora 32 : Can be better? part 016.

    Today I tested the Unity 3D version 2020 on Linux Fedora 32.Maybe it would be better to integrate Unity 3D or Unity Hub in Fedora repo just like other useful software like Blender 3D, GIMP.It will improve the user experience and attract new users and developers for this distro.I download the AppImage from Unity website and I run with these commands...

  • Why it's important to keep the cloud open | Opensource.com

    There's a famous sticker featured on many laptop lids; it goes something like this: "the 'cloud' is just somebody else's computer."

    There's a lot of truth to that sentiment, but it's not exactly technically accurate. In fact, cloud computing isn't just somebody else's computer; it's somebody else's hundreds and thousands of computers.

    Years ago, "the cloud" did indeed just refer to the simplified graphic in a flowchart, so the illustrator didn't have to try to accurately depict the multiple networks that comprise the World Wide Web. Now, however, the cloud isn't just describing traffic or small-time remote file storage offers. The cloud of today is a platform of interconnected computational nodes working together to keep containerized Linux images, each running a distinct service (or "microservice" in developer lingo), functioning as applications distributed over the whole world.

  • Red Hat talks and workshops at NodeConf Remote 2020 - Red Hat Developer

    Red Hat is heading to NodeConf Remote 2020 with IBM to demonstrate a few of our favorite production-quality tools and solutions, all designed to help developers maintain their productivity while successfully navigating the vast and rapidly-changing cloud-native landscape.

    Attend our conference talks and workshops, or talk with an expert during the virtual booth crawl and get a look at our latest workflows for building cloud-native JavaScript solutions on Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift. Our open source experts can show you how to integrate JavaScript and Node.js with other technologies like authentication, distributed data caching and streaming, or business automation.

Ubuntu: OpenStack in Ubuntu, AfricaCom and Full Disk Encryption

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • OpenStack Victoria for Ubuntu 20.10 and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    The Ubuntu OpenStack team at Canonical is pleased to announce the general availability of OpenStack Victoria on Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive.

  • Canonical & Ubuntu Join AfricaCom Virtual 2020

    This year, AfricaCom becomes a virtual event as part of the new Virtual Africa Tech Festival – the largest and most influential tech and telecoms event on the continent. Canonical and Ubuntu will be joining as a Lead Stream Sponsor, introducing the Digital Infrastructure Investment stream of sessions and exhibits with a speaker session by Mark Shuttleworth – Canonical’s founder and CEO.

  • Full Disk Encryption, without LVM, by default - Call for comments

    Historically Desktop / Server, only configured LUKS full disk encryption with an LVM layer. Thus ones root ext4 filesystem was an LVM volume, on an VG group, on LUKS, on a GPT partition.

    The upcoming Ubuntu Core 20 has full disk encryption with TPM support. In that configuration ext4 filesystem is created directly on the LUKS volume which is directly on a GPT partitition.

    For the upcoming HH 21.04 release, I want to change Desktop/Server, to also install in a similar fashion. Specifically such that by default, we simply use ext4+LUKS without LVM.

    It seems to me that despite having LVM layer, it’s not actually used or appreciated much.

    Would you be ok with having full-disk encryption without LVM by default?

  • Ubuntu 21.04 Installer Might Allow EXT4 Encryption Without LVM - Phoronix

    An early proposal by Ubuntu/Canonical developer Dimitri John Ledkov is proposing full disk encryption by default without LVM. With Ubuntu Core 20 there is going to be support for TPM-backed full disk encryption created directly on the LUKS volume and in turn directly on a GPT partition without LVM. For Ubuntu 21.04, the developers are looking at changing the Ubuntu desktop/server installers to potentially allow similar EXT4 encryption directly atop LUKS without LVM.

15 Open-Source Push Notification Projects, Alternative to Apple and Google (Firebase) services

Filed under
OSS

A push notification is the message that pops up on your mobile iOS or Android, and sometimes on your desktop or a web browser. It's often used by application publishers and authors to notify the end-user's device about certain event.

It looks like SMS text message and local mobile alerts, but they are application oriented only appears to user who use the application.

Users can stop any push notification anytime from their mobile settings in the notifications section. However, they are essential for many applications so the user should be selective when selecting the app.

Push technology (server push) are technical term for internet-based communication that occurs when a server notifies the client about certain transaction (notification).

Read more

The Top 5 Podcast Players for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

Because life can be boring at times, people are often on a search for novelty. Luckily, with each passing year, many new sources of entertainment are produced. Several decades ago, television changed how people perceive entertainment: with a television, a person could be transported to a different place without ever leaving home. Since then, entertainment has been evolve quickly, with a rapidly increasing number of channels and expansion in types of programming that eventually culminated in video streaming services like Netflix and Hulu.
The entertainment industry has underwent many changes since the television became popularized, and at present, one format in particular has been rising in popularity: the podcast.

You can listen to a podcast while you cook, clean, or work; they can make your daily commute fly by, or help to pass the few minutes you have to spare here and there: there is a podcast for every person, every situation, and every time frame. Furthermore, and perhaps most importantly, there is a podcast that covers every topic, so whether you are interested in current events, science or science fiction, there is a podcast out there for you. That is why the podcast is quickly becoming a popular form of entertainment.

In this article, we will discuss the top five podcast players available for Ubuntu 20.04.

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Fedora 33 To Be Released Next Week

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora 33 will manage to ship on-time per its back-up target date of next week Tuesday.

While Fedora 33 wasn't ready to ship this Tuesday per its "preferred" target date, Fedora 33 has been cleared by to ship next week on its "Final Target date #1" for this major update to the Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Use Sudo Command in Linux? – Linux Hint

    Among the different concepts of an operating system, the most crucial one is access control, which specifies the level of access that is granted to each user of that operating system. The access control policies ensure that no user is allowed to perform those activities for which he has not been granted any privileges. The two most common types of users in any operating system are the root user (has administrative level privileges) and the guest user (only has a limited set of privileges).

  • Settings to Try with Firefox

    There are various stories about Firefox not respecting user privacy. Some suggest certain settings to reduce the information Firefox sends out (such as this one from Mozilla). Over time, I have collected a lot of them into a user.js file. For those who do not know, a user.js file may be dropped into a Firefox profile directory as a convenient way to force certain settings every time Firefox starts up. This can reset changes made by the user during a previous session, but is also a convenient way to initialize desired settings in a fresh profile.

    In an IRC discussion, Martyb suggested I share the settings I have collected. Below is a sample user.js that I sometimes use as a template for disabling many potential privacy and/or security holes in Firefox. Some, like HTML pings, are probably features that most privacy-minded individuals do not want (and may not have even known about). Others, like disabling cookies and/or javascript, can break how sites work (sometimes, amusingly, they only break the advertisements). Others, like disabling tracker protection, are double-edged in that disabling them exposes you to being tracked by known trackers, while enabling them might cause Firefox to phone home to get updated lists of known trackers. The comments in the user.js point out some, but definitely not all, of the potential pitfalls. The settings are definitely not set the way everybody should use them, but having them listed out at least provides a convenient starting point. I highly recommend against dropping them directly into your main Firefox profile, as they may undo changes you have made for yourself. Instead, either try them in a fresh profile and copy over things that work for you, or research the settings and only copy over the ones you want that will not break your browser.

  • How To check LXD container BTRFS disk usage on Linux

    Find LXD container disk size and how much space they are using when storage back end set to BTRFS.

  • How to Install Perl Modules on Debian Linux? – Linux Hint

    Perl is a very popular high-level programming language. It is a scripting language, in fact, whose syntax resembles closely with C and C++. A Perl module is defined as a collection of related functions. It is very much similar to the concept of libraries is C++ and Java. This means that if you intend to run a function in Perl, you must have the respective module for that function installed on your system. That is why in this article, we will be learning the method of installing Perl modules on Debian 10.

  • How to Format a Drive in Linux – Linux Hint

    Formatting a drive is necessary whenever you are trying to erase data on a drive or partition or to create a new partition. Before formatting a partition or drive, it is strongly recommended to make sure that there is nothing important there, as formatting may erase the data for good.

  • How to Install and Configure OpenVPN Server in CentOS 8/7

    In this article, we will explain how to set up a VPN server using OpenVPN with two remote clients (a Linux box and a Windows machine) on an RHEL/CentOS 8/7 box.

  • How to set up a Kubernetes cluster in Ubuntu 20.04 > Tux-Techie

    In this tutorial, we are going to set up a Kubernetes cluster with two Ubuntu 20.04 servers. Learn how to set up for master and worker nodes.

  • How to find Linux distribution name and Version? – Linux Hint

    While you are working on new Linux distribution, you might not know which Linux version is installed on your system. Sometimes, you need to meet a few system requirements while running an application on your system. However, different ways are available to check the Version of installed Linux distribution. Linux Mint 20 is the most growing Linux distribution and has a number of available graphical user interfaces that may vary from one user to the other. Hence, each user may also have a different running procedure. For this purpose, the recommended solution is to access and open the terminal command-line application.

  • How To Safely Remove PPA Repositories in Ubuntu – Linux Hint

    PPA is popularly known as Personal Package Archives, it provide Ubuntu users to get new and updated software regularly. Some are officials and provided by Ubuntu developers.

  • How to Change or Reset Root Password in Linux – Linux Hint

    If you have not logged in as a root user for a long time and have not saved the login information anywhere, there is a chance that you may lose access to the credentials for your system. It is not an unusual occurrence, but rather, a common issue, which most Linux users have probably encountered before. If this happens, you can easily change or reset the password via the command-line or the GUI (Graphical User Interface).

    But what do you do if the root password must be modified or reset?

    This article shows you how to change the root password for your Linux Mint 20 system via three different methods.

  • Use mobile numbers for user authentication in Keycloak - Red Hat Developer

    Use Keycloak's authentication service provider interface to develop a custom MobileAuthenticator class that you can run in your JBoss EAP container.

  • How to List All Users in a Linux System – Linux Hint

    At any given time, multiple users can operate a single computer system. However, with such shared systems, a system administrator must take the proper security measures so that one user cannot breach the privacy of another by, for example, applying an access control mechanism that specifies the privileges of each user.

    At times, a change in user privileges might be necessary. For example, a user might need his or her privileges extended for a certain task, or a ability of a certain user to access the system may have to be revoked entirely. In such scenarios, it is important for the system administrator to have complete knowledge of all users of the system.

    In this article, we explore the methods used to list the users of a Linux system. Both graphical user interface (GUI)-based methods and command line interface (CLI)-based methods can be used for this task; however, this article focuses on four terminal-based methods.

  • iSH Shell app lets you locally run a Linux shell environment on iPhone and iPad - 9to5Mac

    If you always wanted to have a fully functional Terminal on your iPhone or iPad, now you can. Today the new iSH Shell app was officially released on the App Store to let iOS users locally interact with a Linux shell environment.

    The iSH project started a few months ago with a beta app, but now the developer was able to release it on the App Store for everyone. iSH Shell runs on usermode x86 emulation, and it uses syscall translation so it can run locally on iOS.

  • How to Merge PDF Files on the Command Line? – Linux Hint

    PDF is the most frequently used file format all over the world. This file format is not only used for personal documents but also for professional documents. At times, you might have multiple inter-related PDF files, and you wish to integrate them all as a single PDF file. Therefore, today we will be explaining to you the different methods of merging PDF files on the command line.

  • Making Docker Work in Your Computer Infrastructure | Mind Matters

    By itself, Docker makes great use of filesystem space. Because each container only holds the changes from the images, a little bit of image bloat doesn’t directly impact the server adversely. However, this doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t worry about bloat at all. Not only should we not waste space without reason, images that are too big cause other problems that you need to be aware of.

    The most important consideration is attack surface. Every program that you have on your image is a potential hole for a hacker to exploit. Keeping unneeded software off of your container is the easiest first step to maintaining secure containers.

    However, in more general terms, everything on your container will wind up needing maintenance at some point. The more software you have installed, the more maintenance you will be subject to. You might think, “If I don’t use it, how does it cause maintenance issues?” Well, most software is written by a software team, not just a single individual. I have noticed that, if something is available to use, some member of the team will eventually find an excuse to use it. So, the more software that you leave on your container, the more tools your team will eventually make use of. Additionally, those team members may not even remember to document which operating system tools they are using. Therefore, it is best to start off with the most minimal set of tools you can, and then only add when absolutely necessary. Then your team will think twice before adding something, and— more importantly—it will be added explicitly to your Dockerfile, which makes it easier to spot.

  • What is LVM (Logical Volume Management), and what are its Benefits? – Linux Hint

    Logical Volume Management or LVM is a framework of the Linux operating system that has been introduced for the easier management of physical storage devices. The concept of logical volume management is very much similar to the concept of virtualization, i.e. you can create as many virtual storage volumes on top of a single storage device as you want. The logical storage volumes thus created can be expanded or shrunk according to your growing or reducing storage needs.

  • How to Search for Files on Linux from the Command Line? – Linux Hint

    In any computer system, you have got tons of different files. Some of them are system files that are there since the very beginning, whereas some of them are user files that you create on your own as per your needs. However, when there is a large bulk of files, and you only wish to search for a particular file or set of files for any specific task, then the process of looking for that file or files manually can be extremely tedious as you have to go to each and every directory in search of that file or files that you need. And even then, it is not assured that you will be effectively able to find all those files.

    Thankfully, our operating systems these days are efficient enough that they present us with different ways in which we can automate this task and make it more speedy. Like other operating systems, Linux also enables us to search for files automatically via terminal commands. Therefore, today, our discussion will revolve around exploring the different methods of searching for files on Linux from the command line.

New open source project crowdsources internet security

Filed under
OSS

CrowdSec is a new security project designed to protect servers, services, containers, or virtual machines exposed on the internet with a server-side agent. It was inspired by Fail2Ban and aims to be a modernized, collaborative version of that intrusion-prevention framework.

CrowdSec is free and open source (under an MIT License), with the source code available on GitHub. It is currently is available for Linux, with ports to macOS and Windows on the roadmap.

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KDE Neon vs Kubuntu: What’s the Difference Between the Two KDE Distribution?

Filed under
KDE

I know it is often confusing especially if you have never used either of them but got them as recommendations for usage. Hence, to help you make a decision, I thought of compiling a list of differences (and similarities) between KDE Neon and Kubuntu.

Let’s start with getting to know the similarities and then proceed with the differences.

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Linux vs. BSD: 10 Key Things You Need to Know

Filed under
Linux
BSD

Both Linux and BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) are free, open-source, and based on Unix. Both systems also use many of the same applications and strive towards the same goal – developing the most stable and reliable operating system.

But, despite all the similarities, these are two distinct operating systems with plenty of differences. Keeping this in mind, we have put together a detailed read going over 10 key differences between Linux vs. BSD to give you a better understanding of the two systems.

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Ubuntu Touch: What It Is and Why It Is Awesome

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu, a popular open-source operating system (OS), has garnered a huge community around it. The OS has been around for quite some time and has gone through numerous changes and updates. Since Ubuntu has a Linux kernel at its core, it adheres to the same philosophy as Linux. For example, everything needs to be free, with open-source availability. Thus, it is extremely secure and reliable. Furthermore, it is well-known for its stability, and it is improved with each update.

Ubuntu combines the fantastic .deb Debian package with an exceptionally stable desktop environment to produce a system that works fantastically well. In addition, because it has one of the largest communities, developers usually produce Linux-based software for Ubuntu first to cater to the large community.

[...]

Since Ubuntu Touch is built upon Ubuntu, it uses the same color scheme as and a similar layout to Ubuntu Desktop. Unlike Android and iOS, Ubuntu Touch does not make much use of buttons; the only two buttons it uses are the power button and the volume button. Furthermore, Ubuntu Touch does not have a centralized home location to return to after clicking the home button and instead uses an applications launcher, which stores all the installed application

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More in Tux Machines

Leaving Mozilla and Recalling One's Job in Mozilla

  • yoric.steps.next()

    The web is getting darker. It is being weaponized by trolls, bullies and bad actors and, as we’ve witnessed, this can have extremely grave consequences for individuals, groups, sometimes entire countries. So far, most of the counter-measures proposed by either governments or private actors are even scarier. The creators of the Matrix protocol have recently published the most promising plan I have seen. One that I believe stands a chance of making real headway in this fight, while respecting openness, decentralization, open-source and privacy. I have been offered the opportunity to work on this plan. For this reason, after 9 years as an employee at Mozilla, I’ll be moving to Element, where I’ll try and contribute to making the web a better place. My last day at Mozilla will be October 30th.

  • Working open source | daniel.haxx.se

    I work full time on open source and this is how. Background I started learning how to program in my teens, well over thirty years ago and I’ve worked as a software engineer and developer since the early 1990s. My first employment as a developer was in 1993. I’ve since worked for and with lots of companies and I’ve worked on a huge amount of (proprietary) software products and devices over many years. Meaning: I certainly didn’t start my life open source. I had to earn it. When I was 20 years old I did my (then mandatory) military service in Sweden. After having endured that, I applied to the university while at the same time I was offered a job at IBM. I hesitated, but took the job. I figured I could always go to university later – but life took other turns and I never did. I didn’t do a single day of university. I haven’t regretted it. [...]    I’d like to emphasize that I worked as a contract and consultant developer for many years (over 20!), primarily on proprietary software and custom solutions, before I managed to land myself a position where I could primarily write open source as part of my job. [...] My work setup with Mozilla made it possible for me to spend even more time on curl, apart from the (still going) two daily spare time hours. Nobody at Mozilla cared much about (my work with) curl and no one there even asked me about it. I worked on Firefox for a living. For anyone wanting to do open source as part of their work, getting a job at a company that already does a lot of open source is probably the best path forward. Even if that might not be easy either, and it might also mean that you would have to accept working on some open source projects that you might not yourself be completely sold on. In late 2018 I quit Mozilla, in part because I wanted to try to work with curl “for real” (and part other reasons that I’ll leave out here). curl was then already over twenty years old and was used more than ever before.

Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

  • What is DevSecOps? Everything You Need To Know About DevSecOps

    Most people are familiar with the term “DevOps,” but they don’t know how to really utilize it. There’s more to DevOps than just development and operational teams. There’s an essential element of DevOps that is often missing from the equation; IT security. Security should be included in the lifecycle of apps.  The reason you need to include security is that security was once assigned to one team that integrated security near the end-stages of development. Taking such a lax approach to security wasn’t such a problem when apps were developed in months or years. The average development cycle has changed quite a bit, though, and apps can be developed in a matter of days or weeks. Outdated security practices like leaving security too late can bring DevOps initiatives to their knees. 

  •   
  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

    Starting with good news, the Meson Manual has been updated to a third edition. In addition to the usual set of typo fixes, there is an entirely new chapter on converting projects from an existing build system to Meson. Not only are there tips and tricks on each part of the conversion, there is even guidance on how to get it done on projects that are too big to be converted in one go.

  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

    Percepio announced the availability of Tracealyzer version 4.4 with support for embedded Linux. Tracealyzer gives developers insight during software debugging and verification at the system level by enabling visual exploratory analysis from the top down. This makes the software suitable for spotting issues during full system testing and drill down into the details to find the cause. Version 4.4 adds several views optimized for Linux tracing, in addition to a set of visualizations already in Tracealyzer, and leverages Common Trace Format (CTF) and the widely supported LTTng, an open source tracing framework.

  •   
  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

    LLVM has merged an experimental MLIR-based SPIR-V CPU runner that the developers are working towards being able to handle CPU-based execution of GPU kernels.  This new SPIR-V runner is built around the MLIR intermediate representation (Multi-Level Intermediate Representation) with a focus of going from GPU-focused code translated through SPIR-V and to LLVM and then executed on the CPU. The runner focus is similar to that of the MLIR-based runners for NVIDIA CUDA, AMD ROCm, and Vulkan, but just executing on the CPU itself. It was earlier this year LLVM added the MLIR-Vulkan-Runner for handling MLIR on Vulkan hardware. 

  • Python Modulo in Practice: How to Use the % Operator – Real Python

    Python supports a wide range of arithmetic operators that you can use when working with numbers in your code. One of these operators is the modulo operator (%), which returns the remainder of dividing two numbers.

  • Test & Code : Python Testing for Software Engineering 136: Wearable Technology - Sophy Wong

    Wearable technology is not just smart consumer devices like watches and activity trackers. Wearable tech also includes one off projects by designers, makers, and hackers and there are more and more people producing tutorials on how to get started. Wearable tech is also a great way to get both kids and adults excited about coding, electronics, and in general, engineering skills. Sophy Wong is a designer who makes really cool stuff using code, technology, costuming, soldering, and even jewelry techniques to get tech onto the human body.

  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

    Some days ago, Dunja Lalic rewrote the continuous integration scripts to be much faster. A complete pipeline used to take about 90 minutes to run, now it takes about 15 minutes on average. [...] The most complicated thing to port was the reference tests. These are the most important ones; each test loads an SVG document, renders it, and compares the result to a reference PNG image. There are some complications in the tests; they have to create a special configuration for Fontconfig and Pango, so as to have reproducible font rendering. The pango-rs bindings do not cover this part of Pango, so we had to do some things by hand.

ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

  • ARM32 Page Tables

    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

  • Announcing the Open Source Hardware Certification API – Open Source Hardware Association

    Today we are excited to announce the launch of a read/write API for our Open Source Hardware Certification program. This API will make it easier to apply for certification directly from where you already document your hardware, as well as empower research, visualizations, and explorations of currently certified hardware. OSHWA’s Open Source Hardware Certification program has long been an easy way for creators and users alike to identify hardware that complies with the community definition of open source hardware. Since its creation in 2016, this free program has certified hardware from over 45 countries on every continent except Antarctica. Whenever you see the certification logo on hardware:

LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice