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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google may unveil merged Android and Chrome OS, dubbed Andromeda, at event Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2016 - 12:07am
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:58pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:57pm
Story Lenovo G50 & CentOS 7.2 MATE - Fairly solid Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:37pm
Story digiKam 5.2.0 is published... Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:25pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 9:03pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 8:50pm
Story Libreboot Drama Continues, GNU Might Keep The Project Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 8:46pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 8:30pm
Story Linux 4.7.5 Roy Schestowitz 24/09/2016 - 2:38pm

OSS in the Back End

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Objects! Aaah-ah ... the savior of software-defined storage?

    Software-defined storage (SDS) is one of those terms that has been readily hijacked by vendors over the past few years.

    The term developed from the adoption of software-defined networking (SDN), used to define the separation of control and data traffic in the networking world, which provides the abstraction needed to deliver more efficient network management and to virtualise network functionality.

    Where SDN was reasonably easy to define, SDS has been less clear. Looking at the SDS Wikipedia page, there is far less detail there than on the page for SDN, with only a vague definition of what SDS characteristics should be.

  • Managing Log Files and More With Elastic Stack

    Managing log files is becoming increasingly harder with growing amounts of data and differing file formats. Giovanni Bechis, in his upcoming talk at LinuxCon Europe, describes a solution using the ELK stack (ElasticSearch, Logstash, Kibana), which he says let's you easily collect, parse, and manage log files from different sources.

    We talked with Bechis, a Software Engineer at SNB S.r.l., a to learn more about how ELK can be used to aggregate any kind of data in a productive way.

  • Red Hat, Google Engineers Work on a Way for Kubernetes to Run Containers Without Docker

    In 2015, when the Open Container Initiative (OCI) was launched to create industry standards around containers, it used Docker’s container runtime and image format as the base. But now a number of companies are undertaking a project that would break the OCI stack away from Docker in preference of Kubernetes, Google’s open source container orchestration engine.

    This new project is geared for Kubernetes. It will directly interface with Kubernetes pods. It will enable Kubernetes — not Docker — to launch and manage containers at scale.

    “What we want is a daemon that can be used by Kubernetes for running container images that are stored on Docker registries,” said Dan Walsh, the long-time SELinux project lead, and consulting engineer with Red Hat, speaking with The New Stack. Red Hat’s and Google’s developers are taking the lead with this project, for now, called simply OCID (OCI daemon). “In order to do that,” Walsh continued, “we wanted to build a series of libraries, to be able to facilitate running these container images.”

  • Linux Professional Institute Launches New Website and Brand Identity to Reflect Rededication to Its Mission

    Linux Professional Institute (LPI) is pleased to announce the launch of its new website, film, and brand identity. These efforts enforce LPI's purpose: to enable economic and creative opportunities for everybody by making Open Source knowledge and skills certification universally accessible.

  • The future’s hiring - Linux Professional Institute
  • Cloudera Tests Impala Against Competitive Analytics Engines

    In the cloud and on the Big Data scene, there is a pronounced need for advanced data analytics and database-driven insigts. Apache Impala has emerged as an important tool providing these solutions, and Cloudera is out with some notable test results for Impala. Cloudera, focused on Apache Hadoop, released benchmark results that show that its analytic database solution, powered by Apache Impala (incubating), delivers very fast capabilities for cloud-native workloads but does so at better cost performance compared to alternatives.

  • Learn how to deploy OpenStack for free

    The course is designed for those who want a high-level overview of OpenStack to gauge whether their organization needs OpenStack solutions or not. The course also helps users in getting started with a small scale OpenStack test environment so they can test and experiment with it.

  • Support Is Now the Differentiator in the OpenStack Race

    When it comes to OpenStack cloud computing distributions, now offered by a variety of vendors, we are at a tipping point. As businesses and organizations demand flexible solutions for deploying cloud solutions based on OpenStack, competition is fierce. With so many vendors competing in this arena, market consolidation was bound to arrive, and it is here. What will the key differentiator be going forward? That would be support.

    Just last month, Red Hat announced its latest platform: OpenStack Platform 9. One day later, VMware introduced VMware Integrated OpenStack 3. Both distributions are based on the OpenStack Mitaka release. From Mirantis to Canonical, Hewlett-Packard and others, there are now several OpenStack distribution providers competing with each other, and updates arrive at a rapid-fire pace.

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

GNOME and GTK News

Filed under
GNOME
  • #photos happenings

    We recently released GNOME 3.22. It will be in Fedora Workstation 25. Go look at the video — it’s awesome!

  • Talking at mrmcds 2016 in Darmstadt, Germany

    My own talk on GNOME (video) was well visited. I explained why I think GNOME is a good candidate for shipping security software to the masses. I said that GNOME cares about its users and goes the extra mile to support as many users as possible. That includes making certain decisions to provide a secure by default system. I gave two examples of how I think GNOME pushes the envelope when it comes to making security usable. One was the problem of OpenPGP Keysigning. I mentioned that it’s a very geeky thing which mortals do not understand. Neither do many security people, to be honest. And you can’t even blame them because it’s a messy thing to do. Doing it properly™ involves a metric ton of OpSec to protect the integrity of the key to be signed. I think that we can make the process much more usable than it is right now while even maintaining security. This year, I had Andrei working with me to make this happen.

  • Who wrote GTK+ and more

    I’ve just posted on the GTK+ development blog the latest article in the “who writes GTK+” series. Now that we have a proper development blog, this is the kind of content that should be present there instead of my personal blog.

    If you’re not following the GTK+ development blog, you really should do so now. Additionally, you should follow @GTKToolkit on Twitter and, if you’re into niche social platforms, a kernel developer, or a Linus groupie, there’s the GTK+ page on Google Plus.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.14 and the Web Engines Hackfest

    Carlos Garcia has recently released WebKitGTK+ 2.14, the latest stable release. This is a great release that brings a lot of improvements and works much better on Wayland, which is becoming mature enough to be used by default. In particular, it fixes the clipboard, which was one of the main missing features, thanks to Carlos Garnacho! We have also been able to contribute a bit to this release =)

FOSS Licensing

Filed under
Legal
  • Making money from copylefted code

    I wanted to put this out there while I still have it fresh in my mind. Here at the copyleft BoF with Bradlely Kuhn at LAS GNOME. One of the biggest take away from this is something that Bryan Lunduke said that people are able to make money off from copyleft if we don’t actually brand it as free and open source software. So it seems that if we don’t advertise something as free or open source or that there is software available, then there is a decent chance that you can make money.

  • Help Send Conservancy to Embedded Linux Conference Europe

    Last month, Conservancy made a public commitment to attend Linux-related events to get feedback from developers about our work generally, and Conservancy's GPL Compliance Program for Linux Developers specifically. As always, even before that, we were regularly submitting talks to nearly any event with Linux in its name. As a small charity, we always request travel funding from the organizers, who are often quite gracious. As I mentioned in my blog posts about LCA 2016 and GUADEC 2016, the organizers covered my travel funding there, and recently both Karen and I both received travel funding to speak at LCA 2017 and DebConf 2016, as well as many other events this year.

  • Copyleft, attribution, and data: other considerations

    When looking at solutions, it is important to understand that the practical concerns I blogged about aren’t just theoretical — they matter in practice too. For example, Peter Desmet has done a great job showing how overreaching licenses make bullfrog maps (and other data combinations) illegal. Alex Barth of OpenStreetMap has also discussed how ODbL creates problems for OSM users (though he got some Wikipedia-related facts wrong). And I’ve spoken to very well-intentioned organizations (including thoughtful, impactful non-profits) scared off from OSM for similar reasons.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat’s stock price and employee headcount are rising

    Red Hat’s future growth prospects – which the open-source software company has invested in by adding roughly 1,000 new hires over the last six months – helped push the company’s shares 5 percent higher in early trading Thursday.

    The uptick in the stock came after the Raleigh-based company reported a better-than-expected 19 percent jump in revenue in its fiscal second quarter and boosted its revenue guidance for entire fiscal year to a range of $2.415 billion to $2.435 billion, a $15 million bump at the upper end.

  • New Red Hat project looks a lot like a Docker fork

    There have been rumblings about a possible split in the Docker ecosystem. Now Red Hat and the Open Container Initiative have unveiled a project that may not be pitched as a Docker fork, but sure has the makings of one.

    The OCID project uses many Docker pieces to create a runtime for containers that can be embedded directly into the Kubernetes container orchestration system.

  • Red Hat Earnings And Cash Flow Remain Robust In Q2
  • Dgplug contributor grant recipient Trishna Guha

    I am happy to announce that Trishna Guha is the recipient of a dgplug contributor grant for 2016. She is an upstream contributor in Fedora Cloud SIG, and hacks on Bodhi in her free time. Trishna started her open source journey just a year back during the dgplug summer training 2015, you can read more about her work in a previous blog post. She has also become an active member of the local Pune PyLadies chapter.

  • Linux application Flowblade version 1.8 .

Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • Samsung Z2 now officially launched in Nepal

    Today, Samsung Mobile Nepal has officially launched the Tizen based Samsung Z2 to its customers based in Nepal. If you’re Interested in this smartphone it will cost you Rs. 7,290 and is available right now from official Samsung outlets in Nepal.

  • Samsung’s Family Hub Smart Refrigerator to Feature Samsung Pay

    Samsung’s Family Hub smart refrigerator is probably one of the smartest Internet of Things gadgets around and yet the device is getting even smarter. Samsung is said to be working on modalities to include Samsung Pay on the smart refrigerator.

    The Family Hub is Samsung’s way of redefining kitchen experiences, thereby taking the idea of smart home products to a realistic pedestal. The Family Hub combines the conventional refrigeration functions of the refrigerator with innovative functions as the hub for family communications, entertainment, and smart home services. With these functions, Family Hub transforms the kitchen into an ideal space for family time.

  • Amazon India now offering the Samsung Z2 SM-Z200F Online

    Amazon India now offering the Samsung Z2 SM-Z200F Online http://www.tizenexperts.com/2016/09/samsung-z2-sm-z200f-smartphone-available-amazon-india/

More Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google open-sources Show and Tell, a model for producing image captions

    Google today is announcing that it has open-sourced Show and Tell, a model for automatically generating captions for images.

    Google first published a paper on the model in 2014 and released an update in 2015 to document a newer and more accurate version of the model. Google has improved the technology even more since then, and that’s what’s becoming available today on GitHub under an open-source Apache license, as part of Google’s TensorFlow deep learning framework.

  • Lenovo N21 Chromebook Now Has Mainline Coreboot Support

    The Lenovo N21 Chromebook is now supported by mainline Coreboot. But then again that's not a huge surprise considering Google's focus on Chromebook/Chromebox support in Coreboot.

  • Sixth Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Call for Speakers Now Open
  • Mozilla Says Goodbye to Firefox Hello in Firefox 49

    In October 2014, as part of the Firefox 34 beta release, Mozilla introduced its Firefox Hello communications technology enabling users to make calls directly from the browser. On Sept. 20, 2016, Mozilla formally removed support for Firefox Hello as part of the new Firefox 49 release.

    The Mozilla Bugzilla entry for the removal of Firefox Hello provides little insight as to why the communications feature is being pulled from the open-source browser. As it turns out, the Firefox Hello removal is related to shifting priorities at Mozilla.

  • Almost Fully Funded - Pledge now!

    The Pepper and Carrot motion comic is almost funded. The pledge from Ethic Cinema put it on good road (as it seemed it would fail). Ethic Cinema is non profit organization that wants to make open source art (as they call it Libre Art). Purism's creative director, François Téchené, is member and co-founder of Ethic Cinema. Lets push final bits so we can get this free as in freedom artwork.

    Notice that Pepper and Carrot is a webcomic (also available as book) free as in freedom artwork done by David Revoy who also supports this campaign. Also the support is done by Krita community on their landing page.

  • CouchDB 2.0 released
  • Key article on China and Open Source Software, thoughts for Europe

    05 The fastest way for Europe to achieve all these goals is to create an Open Source (Technologies) Agency in partnership with China and India and I would go so far as to also suggest Iran, Russia, and Turkey as well as Malaysia and Indonesia. We divide the world at our peril. My memorandum to Vice President Biden is still available online for exploitation by anyone. The Americans refuse to take open source seriously because vendors own the US Congress and the US White House and they will pay to the death of all of us for the right to continue looting public treasuries instead of providing integrated open source solutions helpful to humanity. There are 9 major open source categories, 27 critical sub-categories -- I have listed them at the P2P Foundation Category:Open Source Everything, but there is no government anywhere that a) understands this or Cool is addressing open source as a universal ecology. That is the next big leap, in my generally humble opinion.

  • Telenav releases OpenStreetView, an automotive-integrated open source platform designed to accelerate the advancement of OpenStreetMap

    Telenav®, Inc. (NASDAQ:TNAV), a leader in connected car and location-based services today announced the availability of OpenStreetView (OSV), a free open source platform designed to accelerate the advancement of OpenStreetMap® (OSM). The platform includes free iOS and Android apps with optional auto OBD-II integration and web tools to equip drivers and the nearly three million global OSM editors.

  • Open Budget: updated data reveal volatile practices

    “The data confirm a broader trend documented by IBP on volatility in government budget transparency practices. Improvements in budget transparency are often followed by regressions in subsequent years”, OGP added. But on the positive side, “the data show that more governments are publishing Citizens’ Budgets —simplified summaries of technical budget reports issued in languages and through media that are widely accessible.”

  • Amsterdam, Murcia and Zurich to test CPaas project

    The project aims to provide an open platform (City Platform-as-a-service - CPaas) that combines Open Government data with big data and the Internet of Things technologies to address challenges of the modern urban environment. The three European cities were chosen because of their proven experience in Open Data, the project website says.

  • Industrial IoT Group Releases Security Framework

    The Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) , which was founded by AT&T, Cisco, GE, IBM, and Intel, released a common framework for security that it hopes will help industrial Internet of Things (IoT) deployments better address security problems.

    Security is critical to industrial IoT because attacks could have dire consequences, such as impacting human lives or the environment, said Hamed Soroush, senior research security engineer with Real-Time Innovations and the co-chair of the IIC security working group.

GNU Compiler

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • An Early Port Of GCC To AMD's GCN Architecture

    While still in its early stages, there's a port in the works of the GNU Compiler Collection for AMD's GCN (Graphics Core Next) instruction set architecture.

    Longtime SUSE toolchain expert Jan Hubicka started a port of GCC to AMD GCN a few weeks back. Hubicka has been experimenting with porting GCC to GCN for running on recent generations of GPUs. He noted in an email to Phoronix that it's still a bit early to report on, but the slides are now uploaded for any interested readers.

  • The State Of GNU's GDB Debugger In 2016

    At the GNU Tools Cauldron that took place earlier this month in Hebden Bridge, UK was the annual status update of the GDB debugger.

    Red Hat developer Pedro Alves talked about the state of the GNU Debugger with some recently-accomplished changes plus other work on the horizon for this widely-used GNU program.

Security Fallacies

Filed under
Security
  • Matthew Garrett Explains How to Increase Security at Boot Time [Ed: Microsoft apologist Matthew Garrett is promoting UEFI again, even after the Lenovo debacle]

    Security of the boot chain is a vital component of any other security solution, said Matthew Garrett of CoreOS in his presentation at Linux Security Summit. If someone is able to tamper with your boot chain then any other security functionality can be subverted. And, if someone can interfere with your kernel, any amount of self-protection the kernel might have doesn’t really matter.

    “The boot loader is in a kind of intermediate position,” Garrett said. It can modify the kernel before it passes control to it, and then there’s no way the kernel can verify itself once it’s running. In the Linux ecosystem, he continued, the primary protection in the desktop and server space is UEFI secure boot, which is a firmware feature whereby the firmware verifies a signature on the bootloader before it executes it. The bootloader in turn verifies a signature on the next step of the boot process, and so on.

  • Is open source security software too much of a risk for enterprises? [Ed: inverses the truth; proprietary software has secret back doors that cannot be found and patched]

    Although free, there are many institutions that are reluctant to use open source software, for obvious reasons. Using open source software that is not controlled by the enterprise -- in production environments and in mission-critical applications -- introduces risks that could be detrimental to the basic tenants of cybersecurity, such as confidentiality, integrity and availability. This includes open source security software like the tools Netflix uses.

A Linux user's guide to Logical Volume Management

Filed under
Linux

Managing disk space has always been a significant task for sysadmins. Running out of disk space used to be the start of a long and complex series of tasks to increase the space available to a disk partition. It also required taking the system off-line. This usually involved installing a new hard drive, booting to recovery or single-user mode, creating a partition and a filesystem on the new hard drive, using temporary mount points to move the data from the too-small filesystem to the new, larger one, changing the content of the /etc/fstab file to reflect the correct device name for the new partition, and rebooting to remount the new filesystem on the correct mount point.

Read more

Red Hat Financial News After Latest Results

Filed under
Red Hat

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Linux Operating System Gets a Second Beta with KDE Plasma 5.8

Filed under
SUSE

Today, September 22, 2016, the openSUSE Project proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of the second Beta development milestone towards the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system.

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 2 comes with several interesting improvements and up-to-date software components, including the KDE Applications 16.08.0, KDE Frameworks 5.26.0, GStreamer 1.8.3, GTK+ 2.24.31, GTK+ 3.20.9, json-glib 1.2.2, Wireshark 2.2.0, and Xen 4.7.0_12.

Other than that, the openSUSE KDE team did a fantastic job of integrating the recently announced Beta release of the KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment into openSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta 2 so you can get an early taste and see if there are any show stoppers that need to be addressed before the final version lands in mid-November.

Read more

Also: New Leap Beta Adds Plasma 5.8 Beta

Dronecode’s Craig Elder speaks about open-source software for drones

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this month it was revealed that ArduPilot, an open-source autopilot solution, would no longer be associated with the Linux Foundation’s Dronecode Project, an open-source drone platform. This came as a surprise to many considering that the idea of Dronecode came from the minds of ArduPilot.

“Dronecode was established around ArduPilot,” said Craig Elder, former technical community manager for Dronecode who leads software teams in ArduPilot. “What we tried to do with Dronecode was to do a better job at engaging the companies who are using ArduPilot.”

The reasoning behind this move is that ArduPilot is based on the open-source GPL license. According to Chris Anderson, chairman of Dronecode, the GPL license is great for the open-source development community, but toxic for companies.

Read more

Also: Hybrid approach to federal open source

Vista 10 Under Attack From Media, UNIX/Linux Under Attack From Microsoft

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Linux "lockout" tangle snarls Lenovo

    After failing to install Linux on a recent Lenovo laptop, a Reddit user claims to have received a short reply from Lenovo's support team: "This system has a Signature Edition of Windows 10 Home installed. It is locked per our agreement with Microsoft."

    The company is reportedly shutting discussion threads on its official forums to prevent "disruption," though the snarl of links and outrage flying around makes everything rather murky. The core facts at hand appear to be that a) the BIOS is programmed to enforce a RAID setup that is currently compatible only with Windows 10, and Cool there's no technical rationale for it, it's just there to prevent other operating systems being installed. A is, of course, more plausibly true than B.

  • Which? slams Microsoft for Windows 10 update woes

    Which? has called on Microsoft to honour the rights of its customers after a survey found that 12 per cent of those who upgraded to Windows 10 from an earlier version had rolled back and that many more were annoyed with the update.

    More than half of those who rolled back to a previous edition said it was because the new version had caused problems with their devices.

    The problems included printers, WiFi cards and speakers no longer working, files being lost and emails no longer syncing. In some cases the computer required professional repair.

    Many complained that the only reason they upgraded in the first place was to get rid of the constant nagware employed by Microsoft through the GWX system installed on machines that qualified for a free upgrade.

    Many said that they had actually turned down the nagware offers and found that Windows 10 had installed anyway.

  • Windows 10 software condemned by Which? [Ed: Microsoft should stand trial for it]

    Microsoft has been criticised over its Windows 10 software by consumer rights group Which?.

    The body said it had received hundreds of complaints about the upgrade, including lost files, emails no longer syncing and broken wi-fi and printing.

    In some cases, it said, users had had to pay for their computer to be repaired.

    Microsoft defended its software and highlighted that it provided help online and by phone.

    "The Windows 10 upgrade is a choice designed to help people take advantage of the most secure and most productive Windows," said a spokesman.

    "Customers have distinct options. Should a customer need help with the upgrade experience, we have numerous options including free customer support."

    Which? surveyed more than 5,500 of its members in June, and said that 12% of the 2,500 who had upgraded to Windows 10 had later reverted to an earlier version.

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
  • Why we should just simply call ourselves Hackers

    Developers, Programmers, Engineers, Code Artists, Coders, Codesmiths, Code Warriors, Craftsmen … these are currently the labels we use to explain our profession. One can get an idea of how this can appear confusing to the outsider.

    Computers can enrich our lives, give focus, amplify our adventures, gauge our science and grow our business. Right now computing is being embedded into everything and it is now more than ever that we need to redefine our role and show. some. fucking. solidarity.

    Rather than confusing pre-existing labels and shoe-horning them to our profession, which makes use of synthetic intelligence more than any, I propose that we call ourselves Hackers instead of the myriad other ways.

  • Germany surveys cyber-attacks

    Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) has launched a survey to obtain information about actual cyber-attacks on business and government, to assess potential risks, and to determine protective measures. The study should result in new ICT security recommendations.

Red Hat Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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