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Tuesday, 31 Mar 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenELEC 5.0.7 released Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 8:25pm
Story Dekko 0.5 Beta (Email Client For Ubuntu Touch) Has Been Released Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 8:20pm
Story Running FreeBSD on the server: a sysadmin speaks Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 7:31pm
Story More tools for creating QR Codes in Linux Fitzcarraldo 29/03/2015 - 4:55pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 4:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 4:38pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 4:38pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 4:37pm
Story Linux Themes Of The Day Mohd Sohail 29/03/2015 - 10:21am
Story 4MLinux 12.0 Beta Arrives with Better Support for Watching and Downloading YouTube Videos Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2015 - 1:22am

Linux Kernel 3.19.3 Arrives with ARM, ARM64, and IPv6 Fixes, Many Updated Drivers

Filed under
Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman has announced today, March 26, the immediate availability for download of the third maintenance releases for Linux 3.19 kernel, along with Linux kernels 3.14.37 LTS and 3.10.37 LTS. Additionally, Linux kernel 3.18.10 LTS has also been announced a couple days ago.

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The Linux desktop battle (and why it matters)

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Linux

I have been using Ubuntu Unity for a very long time. In fact, I would say that this is, by far, the longest I've stuck with a single desktop interface. Period. That doesn't mean I don't stop to smell the desktop roses along the Linux path. In fact, I've often considered other desktops as a drop-in replacement for Unity. GNOME and Budgie have vied for my attention of late. Both are solid takes on the desktop that offer a minimalistic, modern look and feel (something I prefer) and help me get my work done with an efficiency other desktops can't match.

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Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Git 2.3.4 Is Now Available for Download, Fixes Multiple Issues

    A new maintenance release of the Git 2.3 software, the world’s most popular distributed revision control system, was pushed today on mirrors worldwide. Git 2.3.4 is a small bugfix release that patches no more than 7 issues discovered in the previous release of the software, Git 2.3.3, which was announced last week.

  • Sound Juicer 3.16.0 Officially Released, GNOME’s Default Audio-CD Ripper

    The release of the GNOME 3.16 desktop environment is imminent, so application developers still publish their packages on the GNOME’s FTP website in preparation for tomorrow’s big announcement.

  • MuseScore 2.0 Milestone Release – Free Music Scoring App [Install in Ubuntu]

    MuseScore is a free, open-source music notation and composition application built using Qt 5, with access to thousands of music sheets, an integrated sequencer to allow for immediate playback and many more features. Version 2.0 was released today, March 25, and it represents a milestone release in the development of MuseScore, shipping with an impressive number of new features, varying from major UI changes to musical notation features like tablature support, or improved playback support.

  • Edit UEFI varstores

    UEFI firmware has a concept of persistent variables. They are used to control the boot order amongst other things. They are stored in non-volatile RAM on the system board, or for virtual machines in a host file.

  • Python for remote reconfiguration of server firmware

    There's documentation in the README, and I'm sorry for the API being kind of awful (it suffers rather heavily from me writing Python while knowing basically no Python). Still, it ought to work. I'm interested in hearing from anybody with problems, anybody who's interested in getting it on Pypi and anybody who's willing to add support for new HP systems.

today's howtos

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HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Screenshots

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Reviews

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Samsung Galaxy Android 5.1 Update Rumors Emerge

    Samsung is still rolling out Android 5.0.1 and Android 5.0.2 Lollipop updates and rumors suggest that it hasn’t begun work on Galaxy Android 5.1 updates. That said, a new round of Samsung Galaxy Android 5.1 Lollipop update rumors reveals some potential Galaxy Android 5.1 update details for some of Samsung’s biggest names.

  • Nexus 4 Android 5.1 Release: 10 Things to Expect
  • Run this Installer Hijacking Scanner app to see if your older Android phone is at risk
  • How to enable one of the best security features in Android Lollipop/a>
  • Android 5.0 Lollipop beginning to roll out for the AT&T Galaxy Note 3

    Following in the Galaxy Note 4’s footsteps from earlier today, Android 5.0 Lollipop is now beginning to roll out to the AT&T Samsung Galaxy Note 3. The update comes in at a hefty 1.2GB and carries build number N900AUCUEOC1.

  • This is probably the best collection of Material Design apps you’ll ever find

    There is plenty to like in Google’s latest major Android release, Lollipop. It’s faster, lighter and more battery efficient than ever before. The biggest in-your-face change found in Android 5.0 was the new look of the operating system, which Google calls “Material Design.”

  • The four best podcast apps for Android phones

    Podcasts remain a lively and popular forum for online broadcasting, even with a name that calls back to the era of the iPod.

    As an Android user you’ve probably long broken free of the Apple ecosystem, so there will be no searching through iTunes to sync up podcasts with an iPhone. No, you want your podcasts your way, quickly and conveniently on your Android phone.

  • Open source security tool indicates Android app vulnerability spike
  • Five essential must-have apps for Android Wear

    The whole smartwatch shebang is still a rather confusing mini-mess, where manufacturers are not very certain on how to position their gizmos, while users are not entirely sure that a glorified timepiece with the ability to vibrate when you get an email is worth shelling out $300 for. Well, at least that was the case until the recent few months, when smartdevice makers realised that people wouldn't mind paying a premium price for a watch, as long as it doesn't look like a fitness tracker with a glowing screen, but actually resembles a timepiece you wouldn't mind being seen in public with. Nowadays, we have the Moto 360 (which still doesn't appeal to many, due to simple looks and the infamous cut-off at the bottom of its circular screen), the Asus ZenWatch, and the upcoming LG Watch Urbane, which will surely attract more eyes to the wearable tech market (and we are not even mentioning the amount of traction the Apple Watch will bring along as well).

  • Pioneer’s NEX Series of Android Auto Head Units are Now Available, Range From $700 to $1400

    Pioneer’s line of in-dash multimedia receivers, which were previewed at this year’s CES in Las Vegas, are now available for all through select retailers and online at Pioneer’s website. These units run Android Auto, Google’s OS for vehicles, but also come with Apple CarPlay compatibility built-in, allowing for complete flexibility for a family that runs multiple platforms.

  • Google Maps for Android just got a great new feature iPhone users will be jealous of

    Google Maps for Android and Google Maps for the iPhone may never have true feature parity. This is due in part to the limitations Apple puts in place on third-party application developers, but Google also seems to reserve some features and design elements solely for users of its own mobile platform.

  • Android Wear smartwatches: The benefits for professionals

    With smartwatches and wearables in general, it can be hard see real usefulness through the current hype. Here's how professionals can leverage Android Wear devices to make their lives easier.

  • A review of Android for Work: Dual-persona support comes to Android

    If you work in an office environment, you probably know a few people—maybe a lot of people—with two smartphones. One is a personal phone full of pictures of the family, games, social networking, and sports stuff, and the other is a company-issued smartphone full of e-mail, appointments, contacts, and documents. With two phones, your IT department has full control over your work data and can remotely wipe it, and they never get to see your personal pictures or other information. It's a workable setup, but the downside is all the duplication—you have two phones, two chargers, and almost no free pocket space. The other alternative is BYOD—Bring Your Own Device—in which the IT department takes over and installs a bunch of company software to your personal phone.

LibreOffice Now Toward Cloud Based Package, Get Ready To Welcome LibreOffice Online

Filed under
Linux
News


LibreOffice online cloud based release announcement

LibreOffice has been competing with the two giant companies Microsoft Office and Google docs. Here is another step from this open source community to make LibreOffice in reach of every platforms' users. LibreOffice has announced the release of LibreOffice Online soon in near future. Open-Source fans are ready to welcome the efforts of The Document Foundation including IceWarp and Collabora Companies.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

EP IT department: ‘We should give openness example’

Filed under
OSS

The European Parliament should give the example for the openness of its software solutions, says Giancarlo Vilella, Director General for DG ITEC, the EP’s IT department, speaking at the Document Freedom Day workshop organised on 25 March by the EP’s Greens and the European Free Alliance. “ICT is a strong tool for democracy”, the Director General says. “We aim to be the avant garde of political institutions.”

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Ubuntu And Ericsson Partner To Helps Telcos Achieve Flexibility

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Ubuntu

Ericsson is a monster in the telecommunications industry. The company, which provides products and services upon which telcos themselves build their businesses, has a network spread that sees 40 percent of the world’s mobile traffic, and some 2.5 billion mobile subscribers globally pass through its equipment. Quite simply, in the telco market, what Ericsson does matter greatly. So in this vein, and given Ericsson’s investments in the cloud space, it is interesting to hear of a partnership between Canonical, the open source company best known for the Ubuntu operating system, and Ericsson.

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It's Now Easier To Try PHP 7 On Fedora & RHEL

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Development
Red Hat
Software

For those interested in PHP 7, it's now easier to try out the development version of the next-generation PHP on Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux based operating systems.

It's already easy to build PHP (7) on most any supported platform, but for those interested in RPMs and Yum'ing, there's now pre-built packages of PHP7 in its current development state. Remi Collet who often handles the PHP packages for Fedora, has put out an experimental package collection containing the early PHP7 packages.

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Red Hat Squid web-proxy is not deleting files willy-nilly

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Red Hat

Yes, the bug in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.7 Squid web caching proxy is a bad one. As the Red Hat Bugzilla Bug 1202858 reads, "restarting testing build of squid results in deleting all files in hard-drive."

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Also: Wall Street tips fedora to Red Hat: Sales up, profit flat, everybody dance

BQ Is Cleaning Up Their Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Kernel

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last week we relayed the article by Carsten Munk of Jolla about the kernel of the BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Phone being a mess. Since then, it looks like BQ and Ubuntu developers have taken to cleaning up the kernel source tree.

Initially it was hard for Carsten to find the proper version of the Android-focused Linux kernel used by this initial BQ Ubuntu smart-phone, but after he did there was lots of incompatible licenses and other proprietary/confidential statements within the tree.

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Hands-On: Linux UEFI multi-boot, part two

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Linux

I'm going to start this post by saying something that a lot of people will find surprising.

There are a lot of things that I like about UEFI firmware and the UEFI boot process.

I think it is an improvement over the old MBR boot system in some very useful and practical ways. Unfortunately Microsoft has turned it into yet another way to make things significantly more difficult for those who want to boot any non-Microsoft operating system.

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Bodacious Bodhi Broadens Linux Desktop

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Linux

Bodhi Linux is based on Ubuntu 12.04 and Enlightenment 17.04. It uses a modular structure that provides a high level of customization and selections of themes. Bodhi's philosophy is built around minimalism and user choice, aiming to strike a balance between providing nothing but a command-line interface, and including everything plus the kitchen sink.

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Red Hat profit forecast matches estimates despite strong dollar

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Red Hat

Red Hat Inc (RHT.N), the world's largest commercial distributor of the Linux operating system, forecast a profit for the first quarter that matched analysts' estimates despite warning on a strong dollar hurting its revenue.

Red Hat shares were up 5 percent in after-market trading on Wednesday after the company's profit beat the average analyst estimate for the eighth straight quarter.

The company also said a $500 million share buyback program will replace an existing $300 million program.

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Also: Why Singapore's Yale-NUS College is using Red Hat technology

A Cautionary Open Source Tale, Apple Buys And Shutters FoundationDB

Filed under
OSS

So far so good. Except that almost immediately FoundationDB seemingly excised its very existence from GitHub, the repository where the code for open source projects like this is stored. The FoundationDB repository was devoid of any content after the move. This is in contrast to the day before when the repository was a typical bustling ecosystem of contributors and code.

[...]

There was no warning for this move and while commercial Apple watchers would expect that from a company not well known for its altruism, it’s a very unusual move in the open source world. As Jack Clark from Bloomberg pointed out, this move looks set to incense many...

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Why the UK government must adopt Open Document Format

Filed under
LibO
OOo

Today is Document Freedom Day. As of November 2012, all government bodies have had to adhere to Open Standards Principles; an agreed set of standards to make IT more open, cheaper and better connected.

These were developed following the public consultation ‘Open Standards: Open Opportunities – flexibility and efficiency in government IT,’ to help government to deliver more innovative IT services and further drive savings, encouraging more open competition for government contracts.

It was a major initiative and went a long way to making government documents more accessible and available. Today, as the globe celebrates International Document Freedom Day, it’s time to take this initiative even further.

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LibreOffice is Now in the Cloud

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-s

Today was a big day for LibreOffice with The Document Foundation's announcement of LibreOffice Online. Hosted by TDF, this joint effort between Collabora and the LibreOffice community, with a side helpin' of IceWarp, today announced LibreOffice in the cloud accessed through your friendly neighborhood browser. TDF heralds this as "The Cornerstone Of The World’s First Universal Productivity Solution.

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Deepin 2014.2 review

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Reviews

Deepin 2014 was a major release of Deepin (formerly Linux Deepin), a desktop distribution developed by some good folks in China. Though based on Ubuntu Desktop, the distribution features a custom desktop environment instead of the Unity Desktop of its parent distribution.

That desktop environment, which is called Deepin Desktop Environment, is what gives the distribution a very unique look and feel.

This is a cursory review of Deepin 2014.2, which is a point update to Deepin 2014. for a more detailed review of the 2014 releases, see Deepin 2014 review.

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