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Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The top Android phones you can buy [May 2016] Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 10:34pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 10:03pm
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:57pm
Story Chalet OS is a Modern Distro With a Slightly Reworked Xfce DE – Now on 16.04 LTS Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:37pm
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:33pm
Story OpenWRT Gets Forked By Some Of Its Own Developers As LEDE Project Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:32pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:27pm
Story Pie Message Brings iMessage to Android Devices! Roy Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:18pm
Story What’s on tap for Linux container technology in 2016 Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 9:02pm
Story Huawei's Jewel and Elegant Android Wear watches now available in US Rianne Schestowitz 03/05/2016 - 8:58pm

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Installing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    In the good tradition of our Ubuntu installation tutorials, as well as at the request of several of our readers, we've decided to publish a new guide that will teach you who to boot and install the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS operating system.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (aka Xenial Xerus) What’s In The Bits and Bytes?
  • Gorgeous Live Voyager 16.04 Linux OS Comes Hot on the Heels of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The team of developers behind the Live Voyager desktop-oriented operating system have announced today, May 1, 2016, the release and immediate availability for download of Voyager 16.04 LTS.

    Coming hot on the heels of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), the Voyager 16.04 LTS GNU/Linux distribution is in fact based on the Xubuntu 16.04 LTS flavor, featuring a highly customized Xfce 4.12 desktop environment and a huge collection of open-source tools.

  • Entroware Ubuntu Laptop Launches For $650

    If you are in search of an affordable Ubuntu laptop that comes pre-installed with the Linux-based operating system you might be interested in a new Linux laptop system created by the UK-based company Entroware.

    The new Entroware Orion Ubuntu laptop is equipped with a 14 inch screen offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels, and comes with a variety of specification options that include the ability to install a choice of Intel Core i3, i5, or i7 Skylake processors that can be supported by up to 16GB of RAM.

Third OpenELEC 7.0 Beta Is Out, Built Around the Kodi 16.1 "Jarvis" Media Center

Filed under
Development

On May 1, 2016, the OpenELEC devs have had the pleasure of announcing the release of the third Beta build of the forthcoming OpenELEC 7.0 Linux kernel-based operating system for embedded devices.

Read more

The Thunderbird hypothesis

Filed under
Moz/FF

Let the contributors speak first

It sounds either like something obvious or someting that should have been already asked. To my knowledge, however, nobody has asked the community of contributors of Thunderbird if they have a clear opinion on the path to a (brighter) future. There’s more. Whatever the final choice of entity that will be made, Thunderbird should actually agree to that choice. And at least in the case of the Document Foundation, I believe it would only be logical that the members of the Document Foundation decide on whether it is a good idea for themselves.

One implied matter here is that the Thunderbird project should have a precise idea on who his actual contributors are, and from that data extract some notion on who can work on what, for how long and with what capability. What I’m trying to suggest here is that it is important to know where you’re starting from so that you can also tell what’s the more urgent tasks, technical or logistical.

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Manjaro Linux LXQt 16.04 Dark Edition Includes Kwantum Style to Reduce Eyestrain

Filed under
Linux

The Manjaro Linux community proudly announces the release of the first ever Manjaro Linux LXQt 16.04 Dark Edition operating system, a variant of Manjaro Linux LXQt 16.04.

Read more

Arch Linux 2016.05.01 Is Now Available for Download, Includes Linux Kernel 4.5.1

Filed under
Linux

Yes, it's that time of the month again, when we can get our hands on a brand-new bootable ISO image of the acclaimed and lightweight Arch Linux operating system.

Read more

Also: Arch Linux-Based Apricity OS Up to RC State, Passes the 100,000 Downloads Mark

The intersection of Drupal, IoT, and open hardware

Filed under
Interviews
Drupal

Back in the day, I was working at a large nonprofit in the "webmaster's office" of the marketing department and was churning out custom PHP/MySQL forms like nobody's business. I finally got weary of that and starting hunting around the web for a better way. I found Drupal 6 and starting diving in on my own. Years later, after a career shift and a move, I discovered the Portland Drupal User Group and landed a job as a full-time Drupal developer. I continued to regularly attend the meetups in Portland, which I found to be a great source of community, friendships, and professional development. Eventually, I landed a job with Lullabot as a trainer creating content for Drupalize.Me. Now, I'm managing the Drupalize.Me content pipeline, creating Drupal 8 content, and am very much involved in the Portland Drupal community. I'm this year's coordinator, finding and scheduling speakers.

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Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Backporting of PHP security fixes

    Next step would be to start doing the same for PHP 5.3 (back porting from PHP 5.4, and later on also from PHP 5.5). This can be in use for RHEL 6.x (as LTS support for Debian Squeeze was recently finished).

  • Trusting, Trusting Trust

    A long time ago Ken Thompson wrote something called Reflections on Trusting Trust. If you've never read this, go read it right now. It's short and it's something everyone needs to understand. The paper basically explains how Ken backdoored the compiler on a UNIX system in such a way it was extremely hard to get rid of the backdoors (yes, more than one). His conclusion was you can only trust code you wrote. Given the nature of the world today, that's no longer an option.

    Every now and then I have someone ask me about Debian's Reproducible Builds. There are other groups working on similar things, but these guys seem to be the furthest along. I want to make clear right away that this work being done is really cool and super important, but not exactly for the reasons people assume. The Debian page is good about explaining what's gong on but I think it's easy to jump to some false conclusions on this one.

  • OMG Maven 3.0.4 on stretch
  • My Debian Activities in April 2016

    This month I marked 171 packages for accept and rejected 42. I also sent 3 emails to maintainers asking questions. It seems to be that another quiet month is behind us. Nevertheless the flood of strange things in NEW continued this month. Hmm, weird world ..

Debian-Based GParted Live 0.26.0 Is Out with Linux Kernel 4.5 and GParted 0.26.0

Filed under
Debian

Last week, we reported news on the release of the GParted 0.26.0 open-source partition editor software, and now Curtis Gedak informs us about the availability of GParted Live 0.26.0-1.

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4MLinux 17.0 OS Hits the Stable Channel, Brings Firefox 46.0 & Thunderbird 45.0

Filed under
Linux

Softpedia has been informed by 4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki about the general availability of his 4MLinux 17.0 independent, desktop-oriented GNU/Linux distribution.

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Linux 4.6-rc6

Filed under
Linux

Things continue to be fairly calm, although I'm pretty sure I'll still
do an rc7 in this series.

There's nothing particularly scary in here - there's a fix for a
long-standing infiniband interface problem, but since you actually
have to have the hardware for that, it's not like that is going to
affect all that many people, and the workaround was pretty
straightforward. The bulk of the rest is really just the normal random
noise. Drivers (sound, gpu, ethernet being the bulk of it),
architectures (arm, s390, x86), networking is the bulk of it.

Shortlog appended for your edification,

Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 4.6-rc6 Kernel Released, Codenamed "Charred Weasel"

DragonBox Pyra

Filed under
Gaming
Gadgets
  • DragonBox Pyra Goes Up For Pre-Order

    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the DragonBox Pyra as an open-source gaming handheld system and successor to OpenPandora...

  • Bitcoin is Now Accepted For DragonBox Pyra Pre-orders

    It is always good to see new merchants accepting Bitcoin payments, as it goes to show businesses want to attract an international clientele. DragonBox, a ship based in Germany, recently started accepting Bitcoin payments for their Pyra computer. A neat little device, which packs quite the punch.

  • DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)

    The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons.

DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons.

It’s been under development for several years, and it’s expected to be available for purchase soon for about 500 Euros (plus VAT). But if you want to help fund the developers you can now place a pre-order for 330 Euros and up.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How Linux Frustrated Me Into Loving It

    I have been very interested in Linux since my entry into the Wonderful World of Unix in 2006. I found Ubuntu and installed it on a crappy Dell desktop computer I was given when I was doing online schooling. The computer originally came with Windows, and one day while I was browsing, I decided to search for “alternative to Windows.” Linux popped up right away. I had never heard of Linux before, but after voraciously reading article after article, I decided Linux was the path for my future.

  • HP Chromebook 13 is a business-focused Chrome OS laptop with USB-C

    In the grand scheme of things, Chrome OS is hardly a major player from a desktop market share perspective -- for now. With that said, the Linux-based operating system has captured the hearts and minds of many consumers. It has matured quite a bit too, becoming a viable Windows alternative for home users. Actually, it is a great choice for some businesses too -- depending on needs, of course.

  • Summary: Linux Scheduler: A decade of wasted cores - Part 1 - What is NUMA ?

    Last month, a research paper with title 'The Linux Scheduler: a Decade of Wasted Cores' was trending on the front page of HN. As an individual who is interested in Systems, I thought it would be good idea to read this 16 page research paper. I spent a good amount of time learning about different topics which were involved in it. This is the first post in the series in which I will try to summarize the paper.

  • Vulkan 1.0.12 Specification Update Adds VK_AMD_rasterization_order
  • GTK+ 3.22 Is Working On An OpenGL Renderer & Scene Graph

    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat has written an update about changes to GNOME's GTK+ tool-kit for the 3.20 cycle but he also mentions some of the exciting work that's brewing for GNOME/GTK+ 3.22.

    Clasen's latest blog post covers some of the recent internal changes to GTK+ CSS, theme changes, various changes facing application developers, and more. Those interested about the GTK+ tooling changes can read the blog post.

  • Bunsenlabs Rc2
  • April is almost gone

    The second one was the release of pre-release isos of Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx 3. I must say that both distros are doing a great job; the systems performed so well that they did not seem beta versions to me.

    I did not like Plasma 5, though... I am sure the KDE team is doing a great work, but I truly do not see what the point of this tablet-ready interface is. After all, KDE missed the tablet train (the Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of the day) and tablets are already in decline...

  • New BlackArch Linux version released, now provides 1400 pentesting tools

    BlackArch Linux version 2016.04.28 released for ethical hackers and security researchers with 1400 pentesting tools

  • Manjaro 16.06 - third preview released

    It took us almost another month to prepare this third preview of our upcoming stable release we call Daniella.

    The Xfce edition remains our flagship offering and has received the attention it deserves. Few can claim to offer such a polished, integrated and leading-edge Xfce experience. We ship Xfce 4.12 with this release of Manjaro. We mainly focused on polishing the user experience on the desktop and window manager, and on updating some components to take advantage of newly available technologies such as switching to a new theme called Maia, we already using for our KDE edition.

  • IoT Past and Present: The History of IoT, and Where It's Headed Today [Ed: just devices with a network stack. Nothing new.]
  • 1btn – an Open Source Dash

    The availability of cheap radios, omni-present WiFi and powerful web services means the IoT wave is here to stay. Amazon got into the act with its “do only one thing” Dash button. But a more interesting solution would be an IoT “do it all” button.

  • No Time to Panic as One Quarter Shows Minor Dip in Smartphone Sales - Total Smartphone Market Will Grow This Year (and here's why)

    We now have the Q1 numbers from Strategy Analytics and IDC, the two last remaining of the classic four big smartphone industry analyst houses we used on this blog to calculate the industry average of the total market size, back when the 'smartphone bloodbath' started six years ago. And both SA and IDC are in exceptional, near-perfect agreement on the exact size of the market, we get a total smartphone market for Q1 at 334.8 Million units. That is down 18% from the Christmas sales Quarter (normal that Q1 is down) but for the first time ever in this industry, the YEAR-ON-YEAR comparison of Q1, so the January-March quarter last year 2015 vs now, is down. This has not happened in the smartphone industry in any YoY period. And some are now talking about 'peak smartphone'. That number COULD be a signal that smartphone industry growth has stalled and now peaked and smartphone sales will either plateau flat, or decline into the next year(s).

  • GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha Released With ZFS File-System Support, MATE 1.12

    The first alpha release was made available this weekend of GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha 1, a desktop focused operating system built atop FreeBSD 10.3.

  • 3D Printer Crowdfunding projects

    Like every Kickstarter project, there is a risk. But I think that Trinus appears to be a good project, we need to wait to the launch and review a real machine to know if it worth it. Also, the Youtube Channel Maker’s Muse, made a review of the project and the company Konama, creators of Trinus, sent him a the 3d printer and he currently makes the review of this printer that pledged more then 1 million dollars on KickStarter.

  • Refactoring the open-source photography community

    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.

  • DIY recycling, UCONN's open source chemistry book, and more news

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: KDE

Filed under
KDE
  • LUKS support in KDE Partition Manager
  • Kate 16.04 on Windows (64bit)
  • The future of KApiDox

    I’ve been working hard to enhance KApiDox. I’d like to come back on what it is for, what I did and what I see for its future.

  • Danbooru Client 0.6.0 released

    It offers a convenient, KF5 and Qt5-based GUI coupled with a QML image view to browse, view, and download images hosted in two of the most famous Danbooru boards (konachan.com and yande.re).

  • A KMail Breakthrough.

    This tells the story of how I finally managed a successful transfer of email data from KMail version 1.13.6 to version 4.11.5. It is a non-technical essay exploring the obstacles I encountered, my options, and the methods I used to achieve my aim. It was written partly to give the information, but also with the hope that readers will both enjoy and be amused by the story of the "battle of KMail" that was ultimately won against "incredible odds". Links to the earlier articles discussing problems with KMail 4x are given at the end.

  • [GSoC] Kdev-Embedded, Debugging and programming embedded systems

    The actual embedded system word depends on closed-source IDEs and libraries, with high monetary value and deprecated functionalities. Programmers that would like to use ARM based boards without paying for an IDE will have problems setting up such development ambient and synchronized toolkits.

    The main idea of this project is to provide a plugin integrated with KDevelop to help the debugging and programming process of embedded systems like AVR, ARM and x86 based boards.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Web browsers' updates

Filed under
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat pilots new leadgen program in Canada targeting the mid-to-high market

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues
    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.
  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA
    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.
  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA
    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Leftovers: Debian

  • The Pyra - handheld computer with Debian preinstalled
    The machine is a complete ARM-based PC with micro HDMI, SATA, USB plugs and many others connectors, and include a full keyboard and a 5" LCD touch screen. The 6000mAh battery is claimed to provide a whole day of battery life time, but I have not seen any independent tests confirming this. The vendor is still collecting preorders, and the last I heard last night was that 22 more orders were needed before production started.
  • New sources for contributors.debian.org
    Many people might not be aware of it, but since a couple of years ago, we have an excellent tool for tracking and recognising contributors to the Debian Project: Debian Contributors Debian is a big project, and there are many people working that do not have great visibility, specially if they are not DDs or DMs. We are all volunteers, so it is very important that everybody gets credited for their work. No matter how small or unimportant they might think their work is, we need to recognise it!
  • What's new since Jessie?
    Jessie was released one year ago now and the Java Team has been busy preparing the next release.

Leftovers: OSS

  • The New Kingmakers and the Next Step for Open Source
  • Puppet Rebrands, Launches Numerous New Projects
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet Labs is changing its name to mark a new era, and is out with several new product initiatives. The organization, now known as just Puppet, has also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who comes to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president.
  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.
  • Jeremy Sands: Southern Fried College Football and Down-Home Linux
    This is a “Meet the Man Behind the Curtain” interview. It’s more about Sands than about either csnbbs.com or the LinuxFest he spends so much of his time organizing. But at the end of the interview, he talks about how the LinuxFest can always use more volunteers, even if all you can do is woman or man the registration desk for an hour. And sponsors? It’s a pretty healthy operation financially, but more sponsors are always welcome — especially ones from the Southeast, because this conference is proudly regional, not something identical to what you might find in, say, Los Angeles or Washington State.
  • A daughter of Silicon Valley shares her 'nerd' story
    In the end, I had to leave my job at ISC. Luckily, my work and my values brought me to Mozilla, where I've been both perseverant and lucky enough to have several meaningful roles. Today, I'm the senior program manager of diversity and inclusion. I work full-time on building a more diverse and inclusive Mozilla, standing on the shoulders of giants who did the same before me and in partnership with many of the smartest and kindest people I know. I've followed my passion for empowering people to find meaningful ways to contribute to the Internet I believe the world needs: an expansion of the one that excited me so long ago. And I get to see a lot of the world while I do it!
  • Waiting for Plugins: The Nylas N1 Email Client
    I wish the Nylas N1 team the best. I love that they took the time to build a Linux client. I love the idea of a hackable email client. But Nylas N1, as it stands now, is very limited. If you happen to like the defaults, you’re in for a treat. But if you’re looking for an email client that bends to your will and that you can easily customize as a non-developer, you’re probably better off with Thunderbird (especially now that people are thinking about its future). Thunderbird isn’t pretty—certainly not as pretty as Nylas N1—but it lets you build it into whatever email client you want it to be.
  • RightScale, Focused on the Cloud, Delivers Docker Container Management
  • Drupal developer on how to make your website more accessible
    For open source developer Mike Gifford, founder and president of OpenConcept Consulting Inc., any mention of Drupal accessibility after his name is redundant. He has spent the better part of 10 years improving and cementing accessibility in Drupal, enough to earn the role of official core accessibility maintainer for the project. Accessibility awareness has grown considerably in the Drupal community, but the Internet changes rapidly and the software needs to keep up to remain relevant. Recent press on the trend of decoupling Drupal—including the milestone post by project founder Dries Buytaert himself—tends to skirt the issue that so-called headless configurations can blot out accessibility functions designed for the theme layer.
  • DuckDuckGo Gives $225,000 to Open Source Projects
    It appears as if people have been using DuckDuckGo’s privacy centered search enough to make the company successful. Certainly not we-control-the-world successful like Google, but successful enough to give it some cash-on-hand breathing room. Also successful enough for the company to give back to the community by handing out $225,000 to some free and open source projects.
  • DuckDuckGo's 2016 open source donations
  • H2020 submission is rather 'anti-open'
    So what's the EC's current stand with forcing citizens to use Adobe's proprietary, closed technology and only Windows or Mac for submission of H2020 projects? With Adobe retiring Linux versions of Acrobat a couple of years ago (yes you can still download an obsolete version for Linux from Adobe's FTP but it won't work with ECAS "A forms"), this is a very "anti-open" situation.
  • It's Time to Open Source Moving Vehicles
    Open source software has made its mark on desktop computing, mobile phones, and the internet of things. But one area yet to be cracked wide open with freely distributed software is mobility: from autonomous cars, software-assisted driving, to connecting vehicles to other devices. On Wednesday, Arthur Taylor, chief technology officer at Advanced Telematic Systems, presented an open-source platform that he hopes will be the start of more innovation in software development for mobility technologies. But he also argued for the merits of open source software in a space pretty much dominated by the closed-off products of large corporates, such as Google and Uber.
  • Next Phase of Development Begins for The Hovalin, An Open Source 3D Printed Violin
    The Hovalin, developed by Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, is a open source 3D printed violin that has received much attention since the first version was released. Now the next phase of development has begun for the Hovalin 3.0, and Matt Hova has posted a blog entry and started a Reddit thread about the project that always keeps improving in a collaborative effort by many Hovalin fans. In the Hovalin website blog post, Hova explains what the most recent plans are for the latest version. First, version 3.0 will “move away from the current carbon fiber rectangle to an 8 mm rod.” Also, a lock will be created that will be used to keep the top and bottom pieces together. Custom brims to prevent warping will be added, as well as possible chin and shoulder rests. Finally, Hova wants to “work out a new system for distributing multiple options for the .stls including files with brim, files without brim, pre-sliced files with supports for the middle piece.” There are many changes in the works here, as you can see from just this list alone.