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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story A community distribution of OpenStack Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:11pm
Story A great time to be a Linux person Rianne Schestowitz 17/09/2015 - 5:30am
Story A Linux distro for education: UberStudent Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 12:41pm
Story A Quick Look At Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Roy Schestowitz 06/08/2017 - 8:26am
Story A real-time editing tool for Wikipedia Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:14pm
Story Accessibility in Linux is good (but could be much better) Roy Schestowitz 04/05/2015 - 4:03pm
Story Acer models its latest $199.99 Chromebook after the impressive C720 Rianne Schestowitz 16/11/2013 - 9:37pm
Story Advice for front-end developers from Adrian Pomilio of Teradata Roy Schestowitz 09/10/2014 - 12:03pm
Story Almost open: BIOS and firmware update tips for Linux users Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2016 - 11:13am
Story An introduction to Linux from Opensource.com Roy Schestowitz 06/05/2015 - 8:42am

Licences: Eclipse Public Licence 2.0, GPL Copyright Troll, Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0

Filed under
Legal
  • Eclipse Public License version 2.0 added to license list

    We recently updated our list of various licenses and comments about them to include the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 (EPL).

    In terms of GPL compatibility, the Eclipse Public License version 2.0 is essentially equivalent to version 1.0. The only change is that it explicitly offers the option of designating the GNU GPL version 2 or later as a "secondary license" for a certain piece of code.

  • Linux kernel community tries to castrate GPL copyright troll

    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman and several other senior Linux figures have published a “Linux Kernel Community Enforcement Statement” to be included in future Linux documentation, in order to ensure contributions to the kernel don't fall foul of copyright claims that have already seen a single developer win "at least a few million Euros.”

    In a post released on Monday, October 16th, Kroah-Hartman explained the Statement's needed because not everyone who contributes to the kernel understands the obligations the GNU Public Licence 2.0 (GPL 2.0), and the licence has “ambiguities … that no one in our community has ever considered part of compliance.”

  • Fiduciary License Agreement 2.0

    After many years of working on it, it is with immense pleasure to see the FLA-2.0 – the full rewrite of the Fiduciary License Agreement – officially launch.

Security: Let’s Encrypt, Updates, Google, DHS, Adobe

Filed under
Security

LibreOffice, LiMux, KDE, Qt, and Krita

Filed under
KDE
LibO
  • Coming up on Friday: first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 6.0 Alpha 1

    The LibreOffice community has returned from a great conference in Rome (more on that later this week), and we’re now working eagerly on LibreOffice 6.0, which is due to be released at the end of January 2018. This version will include a large number of new features – and those already implemented are summarised on the release notes page.

  • LibreOffice Is Getting New Look for KDE's Plasma Desktop Thanks to LiMux Project

    During the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event that took place in Rome, Italy, from October 10 to October 13, there were talks about the status the Qt 5 port of LibreOffice's VCL plugin for KDE Plasma.

    Every year, The Document Foundation plans and organizes a LibreOffice Conference event where developers, contributors, sponsors, users, and other members of the LibreOffice community can gather to talk about the future of the Open Souce office suite.

    And this year they planned the new features of the next major release of the cross-platform office suite, LibreOffice 6.0, which will arrive in late January 2018 with a new look for the KDE Plasma desktop environment, work that will be sponsored by the LiMux project.

  • KDE still makes Qt

    A couple of years ago, I made a blog post, KDE makes Qt, with data about which percentage of Qt contributions came from people starting in KDE. Basically, how many Qt contributions are made by people who used KDE as a “gateway” drug into it.

  • Krita 3.3.1 Best Alternative To Photoshop for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Krita is a KDE program for sketching and painting, although it has image processing capabilities, offering an end–to–end solution for creating digital painting files from scratch by masters. Fields of painting that Krita explicitly supports are concept art, creation of comics and textures for rendering. Modelled on existing real-world painting materials and workflows, Krita supports creative working by getting out of the way and with a snappy response.

Fedora 27 Now Under Its Final Freeze

Filed under
Red Hat

Today marks the final freeze for Fedora 27 with hopes of shipping the official release soon.

Only being permitted to land in the F27 repository until the official release will be accepted blocker bug fixes and feature freeze exceptions.

Read more

Linux and Graphics: AMD, Linux 4.14 LTS, Etnaviv Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux 4.14 Ensures The "Core Performance Boost" Bit Gets Set For AMD Ryzen CPUs

    Recently making waves in our forums was talk of a kernel patch to address a case where the AMD CPB (Core Performance Boost) isn't being exposed by Ryzen processors. Here's more details on that and some benchmarks.

    Being talked about recently is f7f3dc0: "CPUID Fn8000_0007_EDX[CPB] is wrongly 0 on models up to B1. But they do support CPB (AMD's Core Performance Boosting cpufreq CPU feature), so fix that."

  • Linus Torvalds Is Confident That Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS Will Arrive on November 5

    Development of Linux 4.14, the next LTS (Long Term Support) kernel series, continues with the fifth RC (Release Candidate) milestone, which was announced by Linus Torvalds himself this past weekend.

    According to Linus Torvalds, things have finally starting to calm down for the development of the Linux 4.14 LTS kernel, and it looks like the RC5 snapshot is smaller than he would have expected, at least smaller than last week's RC4, which is a good thing, meaning that there won't be need for eight RCs during this cycle.

  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Is Almost To OpenGL 2.0 Compliance

    The Etnaviv Gallium3D driver that provides reverse-engineered, open-source graphics support for Vivante graphics hardware is almost to exposing OpenGL 2.0.

    Etnaviv contributor Christian Gmeiner today posted a set of patches for adding occlusion queries support to the driver. The code at just over one thousand lines of code is the last major feature needed for exposing desktop OpenGL 2.0 capabilities with this community-driven driver.

  • AMD Developers Begin Making Open-Source FreeSync/AdaptiveSync Plans

    While the AMDGPU DC code is expected to land for Linux 4.15 with goodies like Vega display support, HDMI/DP audio, and atomic mode-setting, one of the sought after display features won't be initially supported: FreeSync or the VESA-backed AdaptiveSync.

    As we've known for a while, while AMDGPU DC fills out the requirements for being able to support FreeSync, the last bits of the implementation are not present as the interfaces are basically yet to be decided among the open-source driver developers. While AMD can post their existing FreeSync code as found in AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver, they are trying to come up with a more standardized interface that will satisfy the other upstream Linux driver developers too that might want to support AdaptiveSync.

Servers and Red Hat: Cloud Foundry, Docker, CRI-O 1.0, Alibaba and Elasticsearch

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • How to deploy multi-cloud serverless and Cloud Foundry APIs at scale

    Ken Parmelee, who leads the API gateway for IBM and Big Blue’s open source projects, has a few ideas about open-source methods for “attacking” the API and how to create micro-services and make them scale.

    “Micro-services and APIs are products and we need to be thinking about them that way,” Parmelee says. “As you start to put them up people rely on them as part of their business. That’s a key aspect of what you’re doing in this space.”

  • Docker Opens Up to Support Kubernetes Container Orchestration

    There's been a lot of adoption of Kubernetes in the last few years, and as of Oct. 17 the open-source container orchestration technology has one more supporter. Docker Inc. announced at its DockerCon EU conference here that it is expanding its Docker platform to support Kubernetes.

    Docker had been directly competing against Kubernetes with its Swarm container orchestration system since 2015. The plan now is to provide a seamless platform that supports a heterogenous deployment that can include both Swarm and Kubernetes clusters.

    "Docker adapts to you because it's open," Docker founder Solomon Hykes said during his keynote address at DockerCon.

  • Introducing CRI-O 1.0

    Last year, the Kubernetes project introduced its Container Runtime Interface (CRI) -- a plugin interface that gives kubelet (a cluster node agent used to create pods and start containers) the ability to use different OCI-compliant container runtimes, without needing to recompile Kubernetes. Building on that work, the CRI-O project (originally known as OCID) is ready to provide a lightweight runtime for Kubernetes.

  • Red Hat brings its open source solutions to Alibaba Cloud

    Alibaba Cloud has joined the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider program, with Red Hat solutions to become directly available to Alibaba Cloud customers in the coming months.

  • Elasticsearch now on Alibaba Cloud, eyes China market

    The Amsterdam-based company behind Elasticsearch and Elastic Stack said the new offering would be available to Alibaba Cloud customers as an add-on, giving them access to real-time search, logging, and data analytics capabilities.

Software: VirtualBox 5.1.30, Cockpit 153, GNOME Mutter 3.27.1, KDE Neon

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.1.30 to Patch Glibc 2.26 Compile Bug on Linux Hosts

    Oracle released VirtualBox 5.1.30, a minor maintenance update to the open-source and cross-platform virtualization software that addresses a few important issues reported by users from previous versions.

    Coming one month after the VirtualBox 5.1.28 release, which probably most of you out there use right now on your personal computers, VirtualBox 5.1.30 contains a fix for a Glibc 2.26 compilation bug for Linux hosts and a 3D-related crash for Windows guest that use the Windows Additions package.

  • Cockpit 153

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 153.

  • GNOME Mutter 3.27.1 Brings Hybrid GPU Support

    Mutter 3.27.1 has just been released as the first development release for the GNOME 3.28 cycle of this compositor / window manager.

    The change most interesting to us about Mutter 3.27.1 is support for hybrid GPU systems. The context for the hybrid GPU system support is explained via this bug report, "supporting systems with multiple GPUs connected to their own connectors. A common configuration is laptops with an integrated Intel GPU connected to the panel, and a dedicated Nvidia/AMD GPU connected to the HDMI ports."

  • #KDE #KDENEON Release bonanaza! Frameworks, Plasma, KmyMoney and Digikam

Intel Ads as 'Articles'

Filed under
Hardware

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

Filed under
Security
  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug

    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.

  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read

    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so?

    Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking.

    It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.

  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation

    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.

  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security

    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes.

    Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.

  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?

    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

Filed under
Gaming
  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support

    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.

  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month

    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch.

    One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux!

    Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.

  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux

    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'.

    Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.

  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone

    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable.

    Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.

  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support

    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows.

    This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Review: Google Pixel 2

Filed under
Android
Google
Reviews

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping.

Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Arrives Late January 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts Soon

Filed under
LibO

Now that the LibreOffice Conference 2017 event is over, it's time for The Document Foundation to start the bug hunting sessions, and the first one was set for the end of the week, October 20, 2017, for the first Alpha release of the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite.

Read more

World’s smallest i.MX6 module tapped for customizable Linux SBC

Filed under
Linux

Gumstix has added NXP’s tiny, Linux-driven SCM-i.MX6 module to its Geppetto design library, and has launched a “Cobalt MC” SBC to showcase the tiny COM.

Gumstix continues to add more computer-on-modules and single board computers to its Geppetto D2O design library, offering more options for developers to build custom board designs online for prototyping and quick manufacture of small runs. The latest addition, following its support for the Raspberry Pi and Pi Compute Module via its Gumstix Pi boards, is support for NXP’s tiny dual-core i.MX6 based SCM-i.MX6D COM, as well as for a similar quad-core SCM-i.MX6Q.

Read more

KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Over 30 Bugs Fixed

Filed under
KDE

Just one week after the release of the major KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment, the KDE Project on Tuesday announced the immediate availability of the maintenance update to the series, KDE Plasma 5.11.1.

Read more

Image Processing on Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've covered several scientific packages in this space that generate nice graphical representations of your data and work, but I've not gone in the other direction much. So in this article, I cover a popular image processing package called ImageJ. Specifically, I am looking at Fiji, an instance of ImageJ bundled with a set of plugins that are useful for scientific image processing.

The name Fiji is a recursive acronym, much like GNU. It stands for "Fiji Is Just ImageJ". ImageJ is a useful tool for analyzing images in scientific research—for example, you may use it for classifying tree types in a landscape from aerial photography. ImageJ can do that type categorization. It's built with a plugin architecture, and a very extensive collection of plugins is available to increase the available functionality.

Read more

4MRecover 23.0 Data Recovery Linux Live System Enters Beta, Based on 4MLinux 23

Filed under
Linux

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki‏ is informing us today on the immediate availability for download of the Beta release of his upcoming 4MRecover 23.0 live system designed for data recovery tasks.

Read more

Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and elementary OS All Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug

Filed under
Security

As you are aware, there's a major WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access II) security vulnerability in the wild, affecting virtually any device or operating system that uses the security protocol, including all GNU/Linux distributions.

Read more

Pixel 2 and 2 XL review—The best Android phone you can buy

Filed under
Android
Reviews

Welcome to year two of Google Hardware. In 2016, Google jumped into the Android hardware space with its first self-branded device, the Google Pixel. Google's software prowess shined on the Pixel 1, offering up exclusive features like the Google Assistant, the best Android camera thanks to advanced software processing, fast day-one OS updates and betas, and the smoothest, best-performing overall build of Android. The killer software package made it the best Android phone of the previous generation.

The Pixel still represented Google's first foray into smartphone hardware, though, and it didn't offer anything special in the hardware department. It was a bland-looking iPhone clone. It had the same specs and basic design as everything else. The Pixel even skipped water resistance, which had become an expected feature at that price point. Google said it wanted to make its own hardware, but it didn't actually build special hardware.

Read more

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Android Leftovers

GNU/Linux on Desktop/Phone: System76, DeX, Librem

  • Pop!_OS Is Finally Here — System76’s Ubuntu-based Operating System For Developers
    The first ever stable release of Pop!_OS is finally here. You can go ahead and download it from this link. Don’t forget to share your feedback. Earlier this year in June, we reported that System76 is creating its own Linux distro called Pop!_OS.
  • Samsung DeX Promises to Bring the Linux PC Experience to Your Mobile Device
    After unveiling its next-generation Bixby 2.0 intelligent assistant, Samsung today announced that it plans to bring the Linux PC experience to the Samsung DeX ecosystem.
  • Steps toward a privacy-preserving phone
    What kind of cell phone would emerge from a concerted effort to design privacy in from the beginning, using free software as much as possible? Some answers are provided by a crowdfunding campaign launched in August by Purism SPC, which has used two such campaigns successfully in the past to build a business around secure laptops. The Librem 5, with a five-inch screen and radio chip for communicating with cell phone companies, represents Purism's hope to bring the same privacy-enhancing vision to the mobile space, which is much more demanding in its threats, technology components, and user experience. The abuse of mobile phone data has become a matter of worldwide concern. The capture and sale of personal data by apps is so notorious that it has been covered in USA Today; concerns over snooping contribute to the appeal of WhatsApp (which has topped 1.3 billion users) and other encrypted and privacy-conscious apps. But apps are only one attack vector. I got in touch with Todd Weaver, founder and CEO of Purism, to find out what the company is doing to plug the leaks in mobile devices.

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.