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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Quickly Create And Run Optimized Linux, macOS And Windows Virtual Machines With Quickemu (With Auto ISO Download) Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 5:09pm
Story Fedora and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 1 07/12/2021 - 4:53pm
Story MySQL-to-PostgreSQL 5.5 and check_pgbackrest 2.2 Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 4:43pm
Story Steinar H. Gunderson Leaving MySQL Roy Schestowitz 1 07/12/2021 - 4:37pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 2:55pm
Story GNU/Linux Distros and BSDs Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 2:53pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 2:41pm
Blog entry 17.5 Years! Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 2:38pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 2:25pm
Story The 9 Best Linux Distros for Windows Users Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2021 - 2:24pm

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: December 5th, 2021

Filed under
Linux
News

This week was all about new distro releases. We’ve got Nitrux 1.7.1, 4MLinux 38.0, NixOS 21.11, EndeavourOS Atlantis, and last but not least a new Arch Linux ISO release, the first to be powered by the Linux 5.15 LTS kernel series.

On top of that, we got a major Blender release with dozens of goodies for 3D artists, new kernel patches for Ubuntu users, a new update for KDE Plasma fans, the apps roundup for Xfce users, a new app for Ubuntu gamers, and for application developers a new major Qt Creator IDE release.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hackvent Calendar Will Open The Door And Get Your Kids Soldering | Hackaday

    Who says it’s too early to get in the holiday spirit? We say it’s not. After all, people need time to get in the spirit before it comes and goes. And what better way to count down the days until Christmas than an electronic Advent calendar?

  • Rolling-Screw Extruder Goes Brushless | Hackaday

    In the name of saving weight and pushing plastic, it’s nice to see continuous tweaks on 3D printer extruders from folks in their spare time. And to go where no extruder has gone before, [wayne dalton] has managed to combine the rolling screw thread extruder concept directly onto a brushless pancake motor. The result is a filament pushing mechanism weighing in at just under 90 grams. What’s more, this modification arrives a few weeks weeks after we first saw an open source version of the rolling screw thread extruder land on Thingiverse back in September.

  • Eigencomm EC616/EC616S SoC supports Cat-NB2 cellular IoT

    Eigencomm EC616/EC616S are Cortex-M3 microcontrollers supporting the 3GPP R13/R14 NB-IoT standard, with 3GPP R14 notably introducing the newer LTE Cat-NB2 standard allowing higher bitrates up to 127 kbps downlink, and up to 159 kbps uplink, and OTDOA and E-CID positioning methods.

    Both EC616 and EC616S are virtually identical, but the EC616S comes with fewer GPIOs and is designed for the lowest possible BoM cost for modules as small as 10×10 mm. Both target similar IoT applications such as wireless meter reading, smoke detection, smart street lights, smart logistics, asset tracking, smart fire monitoring, smart parking, smart home, wearable devices, industry 4.0, smart agriculture, and others.

  • Check Out The Top 8 New Games to Play on Linux With Proton Since November 2021

    We are back with our usual monthly update! Boiling Steam looks at the latest data dumps from ProtonDB to give you a quick list of new games that work (pretty much?) perfectly with Proton since November 2021 – all of them work out of the box or well enough with tweaks...

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSpdlog 0.0.7 on CRAN: Package Maintenance

    A new version 0.0.7 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich.

    This release brings upstream bugfix releases 1.9.1 and 1.9.2 of spdlog. We also removed the YAML file (and badge) for the disgraced former continuous integration service we shall not name (yet that we all used to use). And just like digest four days ago, drat three days ago, littler two days ago, and RcppAPT yesterday, we converted the vignettes from using the minidown package to the (fairly new) simplermarkdown package which is so much more appropriate for our use of the minimal water.css style.

  • How to install CudaText on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install CudaText on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • CentOS Stream 9 Full Install Guide [Netinstall] – If Not True Then False

    This is full guide, howto install CentOS Stream 9 using minimal boot iso image. I install CentOS Stream 9 Workstation, but also CentOS Stream 9 Server installation is possible using exactly same method. I also use network installation (netinstall), but you can also download and use full CentOS Stream 9 DVD iso image.

  • Intel Continues Making Preparations For Ray-Tracing With Their Linux Graphics Driver - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source Linux graphics driver developers continue making their driver preparations for being able to accommodate Vulkan ray-tracing with upcoming Xe HPG graphics having ray-tracing hardware capabilities.

    For over one year now Intel has been making preparations for Vulkan ray-tracing with their open-source Linux graphics driver stack. The big feature addition has resulted in a variety of driver changes and they are inching towards the milestone of having things working.

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #159

    Welcome to this week's Linux release roundup.

    NixOS 21.11, openSUSE 15.4 Alpha, EndeavourOS 21.4, CentOS 9, Arch Linux 2021.12.01, Robolinux 12.12, and Nitrux OS 2021.12.02 have been released this week.

    Blender 3.0 has also been released this week.

Gamebuntu App Promises to Make Gaming on Ubuntu Painless for Newcomers

Filed under
Linux
News
Gaming
Ubuntu

While it may sound like a new Ubuntu-based distribution, Gamebuntu is in fact a simple application that automatically installs a bunch of things its creator Rudra Saraswat believes are needed for a complete and fully functional gaming setup on Ubuntu.

The app is targeted at ex-Windows users (a.k.a. Linux newcomers) who want to switch from Windows to Linux/Ubuntu and do some gaming. It works on virtually any supported Ubuntu release or derivative and acts as both an installer and launcher.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Linux Fixes Spectre V1 SWAPGS Mitigation After Being Partially Borked Since Last Year - Phoronix

    This week's set of "x86/urgent" changes for the Linux 5.16-rc4 kernel due out later today has some Spectre V1 fixes after kernel commits last year ended up partially messing things up around its SWAPGS handling. These fixes in turn will also likely be back-ported to relevant stable kernel series.

    Thanks to an Alibaba engineer, Lai Jiangshan, are some important fixes around the Spectre V1 SWAPGS mitigation that are landing today in the mainline kernel.

  • Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in November 2021

    As a quick recap, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, almost all software is distributed to end users as pre-compiled binaries. The motivation behind the reproducible builds effort is therefore to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised. If you are interested in contributing to our project, please visit our Contribute page on our website.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 195 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 195. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Don't use the runtime platform's native endianness when unpacking .pyc
      files to fix test failures on big-endian machines.
    

Linux 5.16-rc4

Filed under
Linux

Fairly small rc4 this week. Three areas stand out in the diff: some
kvm fixes (and tests), network driver fixes, and the tegra SoC sound
fixes.

The rest is fairly spread out: drm fixes, some filesystem stuff,
various arch updates, and some smattering of random driver fixes.

Nothing looks all that scary, although I certainly hope the kvm side
will calm down.

                  Linus

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Also: Linux 5.16-rc4 Released - "Nothing Looks All That Scary"

EFF Argument in Patent Troll Case to Be Livestreamed on Monday

Filed under
Legal

At 10 am Monday, FOSS folks and others interested in software patent litigation will have a chance to have a firsthand look at how our courts address patent cases. The case involves a “notorious patent troll,” according to Electronic Frontiers Foundation, that is trying to hide information from Apple, which it’s suing.

“At a federal appeals court hearing that will be livestreamed, attorney Alexandra H. Moss, Executive Director at Public Interest Patent Law Institute, who is assisting EFF in the case, will argue that a judge’s order to unseal all documents and preserve public access in the case of Uniloc USA, Inc. v. Apple Inc. should be upheld,” EFF said in a statement on Thursday. “Uniloc is entitled to resolve its patent dispute in publicly-funded courts, Moss will argue, but it’s not entitled to do so secretly.”

EFF said that this is the second time the plaintiff, Uniloc, has appealed an order to be more transparent in this case.

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Gnuastro 0.16 released

Filed under
GNU
Dear all,

I am happy to announce the 16th official release of GNU Astronomy
Utilities (Gnuastro version 0.16).

Gnuastro is an official GNU package, consisting of various
command-line programs and library functions for the manipulation and
analysis of (astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
links below respectively:

https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html

For a complete review of the new/changed features in this release,
please see [1] below (also available in the 'NEWS' file within the
source code tarball).

Here is the compressed source and the GPG detached signature for this
release. To uncompress Lzip tarballs, see [2]. To check the validity
of the tarballs using the GPG detached signature (*.sig) see [3]:

  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz    (3.7MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz    (5.9MB)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz.sig (833B)
  https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz.sig (833B)

Here are the SHA1 and SHA256 checksums (other ways to check if the
tarball you download is what we distributed). Just note that the
SHA256 checksum is base64 encoded, instead of the hexadecimal encoding
that most checksum tools default to.

fe1f84bf1be270f1a62091e9a5f89bb94b182154  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
B4hftfYuyc7x3I6aEJ2SQlkp6x7zOOrPz/bK2koGuR8  gnuastro-0.16.tar.lz
1ae00673648fe8db5630f1de9d70b49fadb42d7d  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz
kMEdJbsFrRNxDLX4EXntgXNgikJv3/2LIEWGLV/e4i0  gnuastro-0.16.tar.gz

For this release, Pedram Ashofteh Ardakani, Natáli D. Anzanello,
Sepideh Eskandarlou, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Vladimir Markelov and Zahra
Sharbaf directly contributed to the source of Gnuastro, I am very
grateful to all of them. I should also thank Alejandro Serrano
Borlaff, Fernando Buitrago, Mark Calabretta, Zohreh Ghaffari, Giulia
Golini, Leslie Hunt, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Matthias Kluge, Juan Miro,
Juan Molina Tobar, Markus Schaney, Zahra Sharbaf, Vincenzo Testa,
Ignacio Trujillo and Aaron Watkins for their very good suggestions or
bug reports that have been implemented in Gnuastro 0.16.

If any of Gnuastro's programs or libraries are useful in your work,
please cite _and_ acknowledge them. For citation and acknowledgment
guidelines, run the relevant programs with a `--cite' option (it can
be different for different programs, so run it for all the programs
you use). Citations _and_ acknowledgments are vital for the continued
work on Gnuastro, so please don't forget to support us by doing so.

This tarball was bootstrapped (created) with the tools below. Note
that you don't need these to build Gnuastro from the tarball, these
are the tools that were used to make the tarball itself. They are only
mentioned here to be able to reproduce/recreate this tarball later.
  Texinfo 6.8
  Autoconf 2.71
  Automake 1.16.4
  Help2man 1.48.5
  ImageMagick 7.1.0-9
  Gnulib v0.1-4944-g7fc3219bc
  Autoconf archives v2021.02.19-29-g0fbee2a

The dependencies to build Gnuastro from this tarball on your system
are described here:
  https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Dependencies.html

Best wishes,
Mohammad

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Install OpenEMR on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install OpenEMR on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, OpenEMR is an open-source electronic health record and medical practice management solution that includes patient demographics, scheduling, electronic medical records, prescriptions, billing, clinical decision rules, patient portal, reports, multi-language support, security, and plenty of documentation.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of OpenEMR medical office workflow software on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Install Blender 3.0 In Ubuntu / Linux Mint | Tips On UNIX

    This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install blender 3.0 in Ubuntu 21.10 , Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Linux Mint 20.2

    As you know Blender is an open-source 3D creation suite and completely free for use. It is a public project and made by hundreds of people and it supports Animation, 3D modeling, Sculpting, camera tracking, video editing, rendering, composting, and much more.

    It is a cross-platform software that supports Windows, Linux, and macOS.

  • Paul Tagliamonte: Framing data (Part 4/5)

    This post is part of a series called "PACKRAT". If this is the first post you've found, it'd be worth reading the intro post first and then looking over all posts in the series.
    In the last post, we we were able to build a functioning Layer 1 PHY where we can encode symbols to transmit, and receive symbols on the other end, we’re now at the point where we can encode and decode those symbols as bits and frame blocks of data, marking them with a Sender and a Destination for routing to the right host(s). This is a “Layer 2” scheme in the OSI model, which is otherwise known as the Data Link Layer. You’re using one to view this website right now – I’m willing to bet your data is going through an Ethernet layer 2 as well as WiFi or maybe a cellular data protocol like 5G or LTE.

  • Install Nessus Scanner on Ubuntu 20.04 and 18.04 - Unixcop the Unix / Linux the admins deams

    Nessus is a proprietary vulnerability scanner developed by Tenable, Inc.

    It scans cover a wide range of technologies including operating systems, network devices, hypervisors, databases, web servers, and critical infrastructure.

    Nessus gives you malware detection, scanning of embedded devices, configurations auditing, control systems auditing and compliance checks among other features.

    The results of the scan can_be reported in various formats, such as plain text, XML, HTML and LaTeX. The results can also b saved in a knowledge base for debugging.

    On UNIX, scanning can be automated through the use of a command-line client. There exist many different commercial, free and open source tools for both UNIX and Windows to manage individual or distributed Nessus scanners.

    Nessus provides additional functionality beyond testing for known network vulnerabilities.Nessus can also support configuration and compliance audits, SCADA audits, and PCI compliance.

New Videos: Jargon, the 'Bad Linus', and KDE

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Sujeevan Vijayakumaran: All-remote workspace at home

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

It’s been a little over 1,5 years since I joined GitLab as my first all remote company. About half a year ago, I wrote about what I learned in one year at GitLab. In this blog post I will describe my setup how I work because I got several questions about it over the last time. I can also blame dnsmichi who published a similar post about his setup Wink.

I can certainly recommend the page about “Considerations for a Productive Home Office or Remote Workspace“ in the GitLab Handbook about All-Remote.

[...]

I used to have Thinkpads in the past, but I recently switched to Dell XPS. I have two Dell XPS 13. One for work (in white) and one private (in black).

While I personally prefer to run ArchLinux (btw I use Arch!) I’m running the latest Ubuntu LTS on my work laptop.

The laptop is connected to a CalDigit TS3-Plus which is my docking station. This was one of the few docking station which supported 4K@60Hz back when I bought this. I would prefer a docking station with more USB-ports. Right now I have another USB-Hub (hidden under the desktop) because the ports provided by most of the docking stations out there are not really enough for me.

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11 Best Free Linux Webcam Tools (Updated 2021)

Filed under
Software

A webcam is a video capture device that is either connected to a computer directly (typically by USB) or over a computer network. Many modern netbooks and laptops have a built-in webcam.

Webcams spice up online communication by offering real-time video chat and webcasting. These tiny cameras enable users to chat in realtime with friends and family, send video email around the world, to videoconference with co-workers and clients, and even to broadcast a TV-like channel over the net. Other people use a webcam as part of a security system, making use of motion detection to receive image and video intrusion alerts, both interior and exterior, of a building or home.

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Steinar H. Gunderson Leaving MySQL

Filed under
Server
Debian

Today was my last day at Oracle, and thus also in the MySQL team.

When a decision comes to switch workplaces, there's always the question of “why”, but that question always has multiple answers, and perhaps the simplest one is that I found another opportunity, and and as a whole, it was obvious it was time to move on when that arrived.

But it doesn't really explain why I did go looking for that somewhere else in the first place. The reasons for that are again complex, and it's not possible to reduce to a single thing. But nevertheless, let me point out something that I've been saying both internally and externally for the last five years (although never on a stage—which explains why I've been staying away from stages talking about MySQL): MySQL is a pretty poor database, and you should strongly consider using Postgres instead.

Coming to MySQL was like stepping into a parallel universe, where there were lots of people genuinely believing that MySQL was a state-of-the-art product. At the same time, I was attending orientation and told how the optimizer worked internally, and I genuinely needed shock pauses to take in how primitive nearly everything was. It felt bizarre, but I guess you soon get used to it. In a sense, it didn't bother me that much; lots of bad code means there's plenty of room for opportunity for improvement, and management was strongly supportive of large refactors. More jarring were the people who insisted everything was OK (it seems most MySQL users and developers don't really use other databases); even obviously crazy things like the executor, where everything was one big lump and everything interacted with everything else2, was hailed as “efficient” (it wasn't).

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What Is Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Desktop is a Linux distribution developed by Canonical, and it’s one of the most popular distributions, thanks to its ease of use. It’s also one of the top choices for people who are getting started with Linux. The server edition, which we won’t be focusing on here, is also operating in the majority of internet servers.

So what is a Linux distribution? It’s an operating system developed from the Linux kernel, UNIX-like system created by Linus Torvalds in 1991. Linux distributions are usually free and open source, and many are great alternatives to popular operating systems like Windows and macOS.

The Ubuntu Foundation was formed in 2004 by a South African-British developer and entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth. He wanted to create a more user-friendly Linux distribution than Debian, which was very popular among Linux users at that time. It was notoriously difficult to install, however, and the Ubuntu Foundation worked to remedy that.

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What desktop Linux needs to succeed in the mainstream

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linus Tech Tips YouTube channel has been putting out a series of videos called the Switching to Linux Challenge that has been causing a bit of a stir in the Linux community. I’ve been keeping an eye on these developments, and thought it was a good time to weigh in with my thoughts. This article focuses on what Linux needs to do better — I have also written a companion article, “How new Linux users can increase their odds of success”, which looks at the other side of the problem.

Linux is not accessible to the average user today, and I didn’t need to watch these videos to understand that. I do not think that it is reasonable today to expect a non-expert user to successfully install and use Linux for their daily needs without a “Linux friend” holding their hand every step of the way.

This is not a problem unless we want it to be. It is entirely valid to build software which is accommodating of experts only, and in fact this is the kind of software I focus on in my own work. I occasionally use the racecar analogy: you would not expect the average driver to be able to drive a Formula 1 racecar. It is silly to suggest that Formula 1 vehicle designs ought to accommodate non-expert drivers, or that professional racecar drivers should be driving mini-vans on the circuit. However, it is equally silly to design a professional racing vehicle and market it to soccer moms.

I am one of the original developers of the Sway desktop environment for Linux. I am very proud of Sway, and I believe that it represents one of the best desktop experiences on Linux. It is a rock-solid, high-performance, extremely stable desktop which is polished on a level that is competitive with commercial products. However, it is designed for me: a professional, expert-level Linux user. I am under no illusions that it is suitable for my grandmother.

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How new Linux users can increase their odds of success

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linus Tech Tips YouTube channel has been putting out a series of videos called the Switching to Linux Challenge that has been causing a bit of a stir in the Linux community. I’ve been keeping an eye on these developments, and thought it was a good time to weigh in with my thoughts. This article focuses on how new Linux users can increase their odds for success — I have also written a companion article, “What desktop Linux needs to succeed in the mainstream”, which looks at the other side of the problem.

Linux is, strictly speaking, an operating system kernel, which is a small component of a larger system. However, in the common usage, Linux refers to a family of operating systems which are based on this kernel, such as Ubuntu, Fedora, Arch Linux, Alpine Linux, and so on, which are referred to as distributions. Linux is used in other contexts, such as Android, but the common usage is generally limited to this family of Linux “distros”. Several of these distros have positioned themselves for various types of users, such as office workers or gamers. However, the most common Linux user is much different. What do they look like?

The key distinction which sets Linux apart from more common operating systems like Windows and macOS is that Linux is open source. This means that the general public has access to the source code which makes it tick, and that anyone can modify it or improve it to suit their needs. However, to make meaningful modifications to Linux requires programming skills, so, consequentially, the needs which Linux best suits are the needs of programmers. Linux is the preeminent operating system for programmers and other highly technical computer users, for whom it can be suitably molded to purpose in a manner which is not possible using other operating systems. As such, it has been a resounding success on programmer’s workstations, on servers in the cloud, for data analysis and science, in embedded workloads like internet-of-things, and other highly technical domains where engineering talent is available and a profound level of customization is required.

The Linux community has also developed Linux as a solution for desktop users, such as the mainstream audience of Windows and macOS. However, this work is mostly done by enthusiasts, rather than commercial entities, so it can vary in quality and generally any support which is available is offered on a community-run, best-effort basis. Even so, there have always been a lot of volunteers interested in this work — programmers want a working desktop, too. Programmers also want to play games, so there has been interest in getting a good gaming setup working on Linux. In the past several years, there has also been a commercial interest with the budget to move things forward: Valve Software. Valve has been instrumental in developing more sophisticated gaming support on Linux, and uses Linux as the basis of a commercial product, the Steam Deck

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • x86 Straight-Line Speculation Mitigation Patches Updated For Linux - Phoronix

    A year after Arm processors began mitigating straight-line speculation, Linux developers have been working on similar straight-line speculation mitigations for x86/x86_64 processors.

    The past few months we have been seeing Linux kernel and GCC and LLVM/Clang patches around straight-line speculation mitigation for Intel / AMD processors. The issue at hand is over processors speculatively executing instructions linearly in memory past an unconditional change in control flow.

  • EPEL 9 Ready To Provide Extra Packages For RHEL 9, CentOS Stream 9 - Phoronix

    launched and that effectively serving as the bleeding-edge of the RHEL9 upstream, EPEL 9 has already launched.

    Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux "EPEL" continues to provide a vast assortment of packages to complement the official packages in the RHEL/CentOS repository. EPEL packages continue to be derived from their Fedora counterpart and simply augment what is available to RHEL / CentOS (and Oracle Linux, et al) users.

  • Raku Advent Calendar: Day 5 – Santa Claus is Rakuing Along
  • There is a surge in Linux gamers with the release of Windows 11

    The surge can also be due to the Steam Deck effect.

  • XWayland Adds Support For Touchpad Gestures - Phoronix

    XWayland is increasingly great shape especially when it comes to fulfilling the needs of gamers with simply running games lacking native Wayland support with great speed. But when it comes to other use-cases there are occasionally gaps and areas not yet fulfilled by XWayland versus the conventional X.Org Server. One of the latest examples of a feature now correctly wired up is touchpad gesture handling.

    Should you be a fan of touchpad gestures, they should now be working under XWayland.

    Developer Povilas Kanapickas implemented support for touchpad gestures within the XWayland code that is now in the xserver Git tree. Povilas noted, "The implementation is relatively straightforward because both wayland and Xorg use libinput semantics for touchpad gestures."

  • 178: Blender 3.0, EndeavourOS, CentOS Stream 9, Steam Deck, NixOS, CrossOver | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, a brief note about Linus Tech Tips reaction videos, Blender 3.0, EndeavourOS, CentOS Stream 9, NixOS 21.11, Open 3D Engine, Heroic Games Launcher, Steam Deck, Fedora, Fedora Linux, Red Hat, RHEL, Ventoy 1.0.62, CrossOver 21.1, SDL 2.0.18, Xen Project 4.16, Tesseract 5.0, and Neovim 0.6.0. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Give your Terminal a Retro Look Using this Neat Application

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Want to give your Terminal a retro look? This guide contains instructions to help you to install Cool Retro Terminal application in all Linux distributions.
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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Install Apache Hadoop on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Apache Hadoop on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, Apache Hadoop is an open-source, Java-based software platform that manages data processing and storage for big data applications. It is designed to scale up from single servers to thousands of machines, each offering local computation and storage.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the Apache Hadoop on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • What To Do After Installing Parabola KDE and GNOME System

    This is our recommended stuffs for you after finished Parabola GNU/Linux installation with either GNOME or KDE Desktop. Let's start it!

  • Install opensource CyberPanel on Almalinux | Rocky linux 8

    Looking for a free and open-source web hosting control panel? Then try out CyberPanel on AlmaLinux or Rocky Linux 8. It is a free alternative to the popular WHM Cpanel that comes with an OpenLiteSpeed Web server to provide the best possible performance.

    CyberPanel has a web-based, graphical, and user interactive Dashboard, from where we can access Users, Vhost Templates; multiple PHP Versions; MySQL Database, and more.

    It also offers a CLI tool that commands can be used on the Server terminal to perform various useful operations such as creating users, resetting permissions, and other tasks.

  • How to set up an SFTP server on Debian 11 Server – Citizix

    In this guide we are going to set up an sftp server on an Debian 11. We will also set up a form of chroot where users can only access sftp with the shared credentials.

    The File Transfer Protocol is a standard communication protocol used for the transfer of computer files from a server to a client on a computer network.

    FTP isn’t popular today because it Lacks Security. When a file is sent using this protocol, the data, username, and password are all shared in plain text, which means a hacker can access this information with little to no effort. For data to be secure, you need to use an upgraded version of FTP like SFTP.

  • How to work with SFTP client in Linux – 10 sftp commands

    In this guide, we will learn how to do basic operations on an sftp server.

    The File Transfer Protocol is a standard communication protocol used for the transfer of computer files from a server to a client on a computer network.

    FTP isn’t popular today because it Lacks Security. When a file is sent using this protocol, the data, username, and password are all shared in plain text, which means a hacker can access this information with little to no effort. For data to be secure, you need to use an upgraded version of FTP like SFTP.

  • Raspberry PI Pico Ethernet Port: adding the WIZNET Ethernet HAT

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Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Autodesk Sketchbook

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Software

Autodesk, Inc. is an American multinational software company that makes software products and services for the architecture, engineering, construction, product design, manufacturing, media, education, and entertainment industries. It bills itself as a “… leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software”.

The company was founded in 1982 by John Walker, who was a joint developer of the first versions of AutoCAD, the company’s best known software application. Autodesk is listed on the Nasdaq stock exchange, it has over 11,000 employees, and is headquartered in the San Francisco Bay Area.

While Autodesk develops many high quality applications they are proprietary software. And the vast majority of their products are not available for Linux. This series looks at the best free and open source alternatives.

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