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Thursday, 27 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

  • 18/07/2018 - 6:58am
    arindam1989
  • 14/08/2017 - 5:04pm
    2daygeek
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    itsfoss
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    Variscite
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    mwilmoth
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    tishacrayt
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    relativ7

Two years of postmarketOS

Filed under
OS
Android

We've gotten Plasma Mobile to run on both the Librem 5 (video) and PinePhone (video) devkits — with fully free software GPU drivers! Please note that the ports to these devices are still early days and that the sluggish performance is due to the GPU drivers still being in development.
As usually, @PureTryOut has been keeping the Plasma Mobile stack up-to-date with the latest versions. He also created a postmarketos-ui-plasma-mobile-extras package which effectively allows users to choose whether they want only the base installation, or a fully blown one with extra apps like a PDF reader, calendar and music player.

We like to upstream everything that makes sense, so with help from our Alpine friends, @PureTryOut got all of the KDE and Plasma Frameworks as well as Plasma desktop into Alpine and is maintaining them there from now on. The only packages we plan to keep specifically in postmarketOS are either mobile specific or development versions.

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Games: EA, Lutris, and Canonical's Second Thoughts After Valve's Response

Filed under
Gaming
  • EA calls loot boxes 'surprise mechanics' and compares them to Kinder Eggs

    Confusion was a theme—over language, games, the questions—with highlights including one MP asking if Epic can close down text messages. He meant chat, but for a moment Epic's representatives struggled to explain that they don't have control over SMS. Later, Fortnite gets compared to a casino.

  • Lutris is an excellent gaming platform!

    In Linux, typically, when there's a solution to a problem, there are seven other solutions to the same problem. But not so when it comes to Linux gaming. Here, we only have several incomplete solutions to a rather big problem. Steam did massively improve the situation, and it looks like the most mature and likely technology slash software to bring parity to the Linux gaming scene. Still, it's not a perfect fix.

    There are many Linux games that don't quite fit the Steam category [sic]. You have old games, indie games with their distribution channels, Windows games that need WINE, and so forth. If you want to have all these under a single umbrella, there isn't really a solution. Well. Maybe. A challenger appears: Lutris. Let's have a review.

  • Valve looking to drop support for Ubuntu 19.10 and up due to Canonical's 32bit decision (updated)

    Update: Canonical are now saying 32bit libraries will be "frozen" and not entirely dropped.

BSD: DragonFlyBSD, ZFS vs. OpenZFS, FreeBSD Code

Filed under
BSD

Microsoft Office vs LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO

Microsoft Office and LibreOffice are both excellent office suites, but how can you be sure which is right for you? On the surface the two look very similar, but there are some important differences to bear in mind when making your decision.

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Linux 5.2-rc6

Filed under
Linux

I really was hoping that we'd continue to have an increasingly quiet
and shrinking rc series. But that was not to be.

rc6 is the biggest rc in number of commits we've had so far for this
5.2 cycle (obviously ignoring the merge window itself and rc1). And
it's not just because of trivial patches (although admittedly we have
those too), but we obviously had the TCP SACK/fragmentation/mss fixes
in there, and they in turn required some fixes too.

Happily we did pick up on the problem quickly - largely thanks to the
patches making it into distro kernels quickly and then causing
problems for the steam client of all things - but it's still something
that doesn't exactly make me get the warm and fuzzies at this point in
the release cycle.

I'm also doing this rc on a Saturday, because I am going to spend all
of tomorrow on a plane once again. So I'm traveling first for a
conference and then for some R&R on a liveaboard, so I'm going to have
spotty access to email for a few days, and then for a week I'll be
entirely incommunicado. So rc7 will be delayed.

I was thinking that I timed it all really well in what should be the
quietest period of the release cycle for me, and now I obviously hope
that last week really was a fluke.

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Openwashing and FUD: A Roundup

Filed under
OSS

Linux Foundation Leftovers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Programming/Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • What's the Most Secure Programming Language?

    WhiteSource recently put out a report, taking a deeper dive into the security of the most popular programming languages.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Plum UI Kit

    The mobile framework NativeScript team is releasing a new open-source project this week designed to help developers style their applications. The team calls the Plum UI Kit a “kitchen sink native app” meant to provide common app scenarios with copy-and-paste abilities.

  • Kedro Open Source library For Machine Learning

    A new open source development workflow framework for creating machine learning code has been released. Kedro has PySpark integration and an SDK for working with datasets.

    Kedro has been developed by QuantumBlack, an analytics firm acquired by McKinsey's in 2015, and the name Kedro derives from the Greek word meaning center or core. Kedro helps structure your data pipeline using software engineering principles. It also provides a standardized approach to collaboration for teams.

  • Prisons Are Banning Books That Teach Prisoners How to Code

    According to public records obtained by the Salem Reporter, the Oregon Department of Corrections has banned dozens of books related to programming and technology as they come through the mail room, ensuring that they don’t get to the hands of prisoners.

  • Oregon prisons ban dozens of technology and programming books over security concerns

    Chan said he understands security concerns for books related to hacking, but they often see introductory or basic books disallowed.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • [Attackers] Used Two Firefox Zero Days to Hit a Crypto Exchange

    Luckily, not only did Coinbase and an outside researcher notice the bugs, but Coinbase picked up on the attack before any money could be stolen or the network could be infiltrated.

  • Romanian hospitals, affected by ransomware attack [iophk: "Windows TCO"]

    Four hospitals in Romania have been affected by the BadRabbit 4 ransomware, the Romanian Intelligence Service (SRI) announced. One of the hospitals is the Victor Babeş Infectious Diseases Hospital in Bucharest. The other hospitals are located in Huşi, Dorohoi and Cărbuneşti.

  • Cyber-attacks on hospitals most likely come from China, SRI says

    The specialists with the Cyberint National Centre with the Romanian Intelligence Service (SRI) suspect that the recent attacks on hospitals in Romania come from China, service representatives say, quoted by digi24.ro.

    “Regarding the cyber-attacks on hospitals, the Cyberint National Centre suspect the attackers are of Chinese origin. The time interval was considered, when the Chinese hackers are active and the clues left along with the ransom requests,” SRI says in a release.

  • Five Romanian hospitals targeted by cyber attack [iophk: "Windows TCO"]

    Five hospitals in the Romanian capital Bucharest are the target of a cyber attack. Various Romanian media report this. Opposite the news platform Stiri Lazi, the Romanian Minister of Health has announced that patients will be affected by the attack.

  • US 'launched cyber-attack on Iran weapons systems'

    The cyber-attack disabled computer systems controlling rocket and missile launchers, the Washington Post said.

  • [Compromise] of U.S. Border Surveillance Contractor Is Way Bigger Than the Government Lets On

    Even as Homeland Security officials have attempted to downplay the impact of a security intrusion that reached deep into the network of a federal surveillance contractor, secret documents, handbooks, and slides concerning surveillance technology deployed along U.S. borders are being widely and openly shared online.

    A terabyte of torrents seeded by Distributed Denial of Secrets (DDOS)—journalists dispersing records that governments and corporations would rather nobody read—are as of writing being downloaded daily. As of this week, that includes more than 400 GB of data stolen by an unknown actor from Perceptics, a discreet contractor based in Knoxville, Tennessee, that works for Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and is, regardless of whatever U.S. officials say, right now the epicenter of a major U.S. government data breach.

KStars v3.3.1 is released

Filed under
KDE

KStars v3.3.1 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux on all platforms (Intel/AMD and ARM). This is yet another maintenance release with a few new experimental features and addons.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Google to Abandon Tablets in Favor of Chrome OS Laptops

    One reason that Google is moving away from tablets has to do with the fact that they are just not selling all that well.

  • Support for Jupyter notebooks has evolved in Cantor

    Hello everyone, it's been almost a month since my last post and there are a lot of changes that have been done since then.

    First, what I called the "minimal plan" is arleady done! Cantor can now load Jupyter notebooks and save the currently opened document in Jupyter format.

    Below you can see how one of the Jypiter notebooks I'm using for test purposes (I have mentioned them in previous post) looks in Jupyter and in Cantor.

  • Will Thompson: Rebasing downstream translations

    At Endless, we maintain downstream translations for an number of GNOME projects, such as gnome-software, gnome-control-center and gnome-initial-setup. 

    [...]

    Whenever we update to a new version of GNOME, we have to reconcile our downstream translations with the changes from upstream. We want to preserve our intentional downstream changes, and keep our translations for strings that don’t exist upstream; but we also want to pull in translations for new upstream strings, as well as improved translations for existing strings. Earlier this year, the translation-rebase baton was passed to me. My predecessor would manually reapply our downstream changes for a set of officially-supported languages, but unlike him, I can pretty much only speak English, so I needed something a bit more mechanical.

    I spoke to various people from other distros about this problem.1 A common piece of advice was to not maintain downstream translation changes: appealing, but not really an option at the moment. I also heard that Ubuntu follows a straightforward rule: once the translation for a string has been changed downstream, all future upstream changes to the translation for that string are ignored. The assumption is that all downstream changes to a translation must have been made for a reason, and should be preserved. This is essentially a superset of what we’ve done manually in the past.

    I wrote a little tool to implement this logic, pomerge. Its “rebase” mode takes the last common upstream ancestor, the last downstream commit, and a working copy with the newest downstream code. For each locale, for each string in the translation in the working copy, it compares the old upstream and downstream translations – if they differ, it merges the latter into the working copy.

  • GNOME 3.33.3 Released, Kernel Security Updates for RHEL and CentOS, Wine Developers Concerned with Ubuntu 19.10 Dropping 32-Bit Support, Bzip2 to Get an Update and OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Now Available

    GNOME 3.33.3 was released yesterday. Note that this release is development code and is intended for testing purposes.

  • TenFourFox FPR15b1 available

    In honour of New Coke's temporary return to the market (by the way, I say it tastes like Pepsi and my father says it tastes like RC), I failed again with this release to get some sort of async/await support off the ground, and we are still plagued by issue 533. The second should be possible to fix, but I don't know exactly what's wrong. The first is not possible to fix without major changes because it reaches up into the browser event loop, but should be still able to get parsing and thus enable at least partial functionality from the sites that depend on it. That part didn't work either. A smaller hack, though, did make it into this release with test changes. Its semantics aren't quite right, but they're good enough for what requires it and does fix some parts of Github and other sites.

  • Cloudflare's random number generator, robotics data visualization, npm token scanning, and more news

    Is there such a thing as a truly random number? Internet security and services provider Cloudflare things so. To prove it, the company has formed The League of Entropy, an open source project to create a generator for random numbers.

    The League consists of Cloudflare and "five other organisations — predominantly universities and security companies." They share random numbers, using an open source tool called Drand (short for Distributed Randomness Beacon Daemon). The numbers are then "composited into one random number" on the basis that "several random numbers are more random than one random number." While the League's random number generator isn't intended "for any kind of password or cryptographic seed generation," Cloudflare's CEO Matthew Prince points out that if "you need a way of having a known random source, this is a really valuable tool."

Kernel: Rants, PulseAudio 12, Valve-Related Bug and Mesa 19.1.1 RC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 'Bulls%^t! Complete bull$h*t!' Reset the clock on the last time woke Linus Torvalds exploded at a Linux kernel dev

    Linux kernel chieftain Linus Torvalds owes the swear jar a few quid this week, although by his standards this most recent rant of his is relatively restrained.

    Over on the kernel development mailing list, in a long and involved thread about the functionality and efficiency of operating system page caches, firebrand-turned-woke Torvalds described Aussie programmer Dave Chinner’s arguments in the debate as "bullshit," "complete bullshit," and "obviously garbage."

    To be fair to the open-source overlord, this is a far less personal attack than previous outbursts, such as the time he slammed "some security people" as "just f#cking morons," or that unforgettable straight-to-the-point detonation: "Mauro, SHUT THE F**K UP."

  • It Looks Like PulseAudio 13.0 Will Be Releasing Soon

    It's been a year since the release of PulseAudio 12 and even eleven months since the last point release but it looks like the next PulseAudio release will be out very soon.

    The next PulseAudio release has been under discussion with the sorting out of when the release will take place and any blocker bugs. As it stands now, there is just one blocker bug remaining and that is addressing a regression.

  • A One Line Kernel Patch Appears To Solve The Recent Linux + Steam Networking Regression

    As a follow-up to the issue reported on Friday regarding the latest Linux kernel releases causing problems for Valve's Steam client, a fix appears pending that with changing around one line of code does appear to address the regression.

    Linus Torvalds got involved and pointed out a brand new kernel patch that may solve the issue. That patch was quickly reaffirmed by Linux gamers as well as prominent Valve Linux developer Pierre-Loup A. Griffais.

  • Mesa 19.1.1 release candidate
    Hello list,
    
    The candidate for the Mesa 19.1.1 is now available. Currently we have:
     - 27 queued
     - 0 nominated (outstanding)
     - and 0 rejected patch
    
    
    The current queue consists mostly in fixes for different drivers (RADV, ANV,
    Nouveau, Virgl, V3D, R300g, ...)
    
    The queue also contains different fixes for different parts (Meson build, GLX,
    etc).
    
    Take a look at section "Mesa stable queue" for more information
    
    
    Testing reports/general approval
    --------------------------------
    Any testing reports (or general approval of the state of the branch) will be
    greatly appreciated.
    
    The plan is to have 19.1.1 this Tuesday (25th June), around or shortly after
    10:00 GMT.
    
    If you have any questions or suggestions - be that about the current patch queue
    or otherwise, please go ahead.
    
    
    Trivial merge conflicts
    -----------------------
    commit 25a34df61439b25645d03510d6354cb1f5e8a185
    Author: Kenneth Graunke 
    
        iris: Fix iris_flush_and_dirty_history to actually dirty history.
    
        (cherry picked from commit 64fb20ed326fa0e524582225faaa4bb28f6e4349)
    
    
    Cheers,
        J.A.
    
  • Mesa 19.1.1 Is Coming Next Week With A Variety Of Fixes

    Debuting two weeks ago was the Mesa 19.1 quarterly feature update while due out early next week is the first bug-fix point release.

    Mesa 19.1 is a huge update over 19.0 and earlier. Mesa 19.1 brought multiple new Gallium3D drivers as well as a new Vulkan driver (TURNIP), performance optimizations, new Vulkan extensions, mature Icelake support, and a variety of other features as listed in the aforelinked article.

OpenBSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD Adds Initial User-Space Support For Vulkan

    Somewhat surprisingly, OpenBSD has added the Vulkan library and ICD loader support as their newest port.

    This new graphics/vulkan-loader port provides the generic Vulkan library and ICD support that is the common code for Vulkan implementations on the system. This doesn't enable any Vulkan hardware drivers or provide something new not available elsewhere, but is rare seeing Vulkan work among the BSDs. There is also in ports the related components like the SPIR-V headers and tools, glsllang, and the Vulkan tools and validation layers.

  • SSH gets protection against side channel attacks

    Implementation-wise, keys are encrypted "shielded" when loaded and then automatically and transparently unshielded when used for signatures or when being saved/serialised.

    Hopefully we can remove this in a few years time when computer architecture has become less unsafe.

  • doas environmental security

    Ted Unangst (tedu@) posted to the tech@ mailing list regarding recent changes to environment handling in doas (in -current): [...]

Programming: PNG, AArch64, Python and Tor

Filed under
Development
  • Segfaults and Twitter monkeys: a tale of pointlessness

    For a few years in the 1990s, when PNG was just getting established as a Web image format, I was a developer on the libpng team.

    One reason I got involved is that the compression patent on GIFs was a big deal at the time. I had been the maintainer of GIFLIB since 1989; it was on my watch that Marc Andreesen chose that code for use in the first graphics-capable browser in ’94. But I handed that library off to a hacker in Japan who I thought would be less exposed to the vagaries of U.S. IP law. (Years later, after the century had turned and the LZW patents expired, it came back to me.)

    Then, sometime within a few years of 1996, I happened to read the PNG standard, and thought the design of the format was very elegant. So I started submitting patches to libpng and ended up writing the support for six of the minor chunk types, as well as implementing the high-level interface to the library that’s now in general use.

    As part of my work on PNG, I volunteered to clean up some code that Greg Roelofs had been maintaining and package it for release. This was “gif2png” and it was more or less the project’s official GIF converter.

  • AArch64 support for ELF Dissector

    After having been limited to maintenance for a while I finally got around to some feature work on ELF Dissector again this week, another side-project of mine I haven’t written about here yet. ELF Dissector is an inspection tool for the internals of ELF files, the file format used for executables and shared libraries on Linux and a few other operating systems.

    [...]

    ELF Dissector had its first commit more than six years ago, but it is still lingering around in a playground repository, which doesn’t really do it justice. One major blocker for making it painlessly distributable however are its dependencies on private Binutils/GCC API. Using the Capstone disassembler is therefore also a big step towards addressing that, now only the use of the demangler API remains.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (clxxxiii) stackoverflow python report
  • denemo @ Savannah: Release 2.3 is imminent - please test.
  • Arguments | Another way to work with user inputs – Part 7
  • Call for setting up new obfs4 bridges

    BridgeDB is running low on obfs4 bridges and often fails to provide users with three bridges per request. Besides, we recently fixed a BridgeDB issue that could get an obfs4 bridge blocked because of its vanilla bridge descriptor: <https://bugs.torproject.org/28655>

    We therefore want to encourage volunteers to set up new obfs4 bridges to help censored users. Over the last few weeks, we have been improving our obfs4 setup guide which walks you through the process: <https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/PluggableTransports/obfs4proxy>p>

Security: Windows, 'DevSecOps', SSH, Bash and More

Filed under
Security
  • Electronic Health Records at 26 Hospitals Hit by Two-Hour Outage [iophk: "Windows TCO"]

    Universal, which manages more than 350 health-care facilities in the U.S. and U.K., declined to specify the technical issues or say how many patient records were affected. The problem lasted for less than two hours and the affected hospitals have returned to normal operations, said Eric Goodwin, chief information officer of the King of Prussia, Pennsylvania-based company.

  • DevSecOps: 4 key considerations for beginners

    Security used to be the responsibility of a dedicated team in the last development stage, but with development cycles increasing in number and speed, security practices need to be constantly updated.

    This has led to the rise of DevSecOps, which emphasizes security within DevOps. Companies need DevSecOps to make sure their initiatives run safely and securely. Without DevSecOps, DevOps teams need to rebuild and update all their systems when a vulnerability is found, wasting time and effort.

  • OpenSSH to Keep Private Keys Encrypted at Rest in RAM

    A commit for the OpenSSH project adds protection for private keys in memory when they are not in use, making it more difficult for an adversary to extract them through side-channel attacks leveraging hardware vulnerabilities.

    OpenSSH is the most popular implementation of the SSH (Secure Shell) protocol, being the default solution in many Linux distributions for encrypting connections to a remote system.

  • OpenSSH adds protection against Spectre, Meltdown, Rowhammer and RAMBleed attacks
  • GNU Bash Unsupported Characters Heap-Based Buffer Overflow Vulnerability [CVE-2012-6711]

    A vulnerability in the lib/sh/strtrans.c:anicstr function of GNU Bash could allow an authenticated, local attacker to execute code on a targeted system.The vulnerability is due buffer errors within the lib/sh/strtrans.c:anicstr function of the affected software. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by providing print data through the echo built-in function. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to execute code on the targeted system.GNU Bash has confirmed this vulnerability and released a software patch.

  • Daily News Roundup: Malware in Your Pirated Software

    Researchers at ESET and Malwarebytes have discovered crypto mining malware hidden in pirated music production software.

  • A Method for Establishing Liability for Data Breaches

    Last month, the First American Financial Corporation—which provides title insurance for millions of Americans—acknowledged a cybersecurity vulnerability that potentially exposed 885 million private financial records related to mortgage deals to unauthorized viewers. These records might have revealed bank account numbers and statements, mortgage and tax records, Social Security numbers, wire transaction receipts, and driver’s license images to such viewers. If history is any guide, not much will happen and companies holding sensitive personal information on individuals will have little incentive to improve their cybersecurity postures. Congress needs to act to provide such incentives.

    The story is all too familiar, as news reports of data breaches involving the release of personal information for tens of millions of, or even a hundred million, Americans have become routine. A company (or a government agency) pays insufficient attention to cybersecurity matters despite warnings that the cybersecurity measures it takes are inadequate and therefore fails to prevent a breach that could be remediated by proper attention to such warnings. In the aftermath of such incidents, errant companies are required by law to report breaches to the individuals whose personal information has been potentially compromised. Frequently, these companies also offer free credit monitoring services to affected individuals for a year or two.

Enso OS, A Desktop Mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Enso OS is a relatively new GNU/Linux distro based on Ubuntu with XFCE desktop coupled with Gala Window Manager. Looking at Enso is like looking at a mix between Xubuntu and elementary OS. It features a Super key start menu called Panther and a global menu on its top panel, making the interface very interesting to try. This overview briefly highlights the user interface for you.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: SUSE, Ubuntu, Red Hat, OpenStack and Raspberry Digital Sigange

  • A Native Kubernetes Operator Tailored for Cloud Foundry

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit in Philadephia, Troy Topnik of SUSE and Enrique Encalada of IBM discussed the progress being made on cf-operator, a project that’s part of the CF Containerization proposal. They show what the operator can do and how Cloud Foundry deployments can be managed with it. They also delve deeper, and talk about implementation techniques, Kubernetes Controllers and Custom Resources. This is a great opportunity to learn about how Cloud Foundry can work flawlessly on top of Kubernetes. Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks form CF Summit on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what is happening in the Cloud Foundry world! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch Troy and Enrique’s talk below:

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 26 June 2019

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list or visit the Ubuntu Server discourse hub for more discussion.

  • Redefining RHEL: Introduction to Red Hat Insights

    At Red Hat Summit we redefined what is included in a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscription, and part of that is announcing that every RHEL subscription will include Red Hat Insights. The Insights team is very excited about this, and we wanted to take an opportunity to expand on what this means to you, and to share some of the basics of Red Hat Insights. We wanted to make RHEL easier than ever to adopt, and give our customers the control, confidence and freedom to help scale their environments through intelligent management. Insights is an important component in giving organizations the ability to predict, prevent, and remediate problems before they occur.

  • Red Hat Shares ― Special edition: Red Hat Summit recap
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OKD4 Release and Road Map Update with Clayton Coleman (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Clayton Coleman, Lead Architect, Containerized Application Infrastructure (OpenShift, Atomic, and Kubernetes) leads a discussion about the current development efforts for OKD4, Fedora CoreOS and Kubernetes in general as well as the philosophy guiding OKD 4 develpoment efforts. The briefing includes discussion of shared community goals for OKD4 and beyond and Q/A with some of the engineers currently working on OKD. The proposed goal/vision for OKD 4 is to be the perfect Kubernetes distribution for those who want to continuously be on the latest Kubernetes and ecosystem components combining an up-to-date OS, the Kubernetes control plane, and a large number of ecosystem operators to provide an easy-to-extend distribution of Kubernetes that is always on the latest released version of ecosystem tools.

  • OpenStack Foundation Joins Open Source Initiative as Affiliate Member

    The Open Source Initiative ® (OSI), steward of the Open Source Definition and internationally recognized body for approving Open Source Software licenses, today announces the affiliate membership of The OpenStack Foundation (OSF). Since 2012, the OSF has been the home for the OpenStack cloud software project, working to promote the global development, distribution and adoption of open infrastructure. Today, with five active projects and more than 100,000 community members from 187 countries, the OSF is recognized across industries as both a leader in open source development and an exemplar in open source practices. The affiliate membership provides both organizations a unique opportunity to work together to identify and share resources that foster community and facilitate collaboration to support the awareness and integration of open source technologies. While Open Source Software is now embraced and often touted by organizations large and small, for many just engaging with the community—and even some longtime participants—challenges remain. Community-based support and resources remain vital, ensuring those new to the ecosystem understand the norms and expectations, while those seeking to differentiate themselves remain authentically engaged. The combined efforts of the OSI and the OSF will compliment one another and contribute to these efforts.

  • Raspberry Digital Sigange details

    system starts in digital signage mode with the saved settings; the admin interface is always displayed after the machine bootstrap (interface can be password-protected in the donors’ build) and if not used for a few seconds, it will auto-launch the kiosk mode; the web interface can be also used remotely; SSH remote management is available: you can login as pi or root user with the same password set for the admin interface. Operating system can be completely customized by the administrator using this feature (donors version only); screen can be rotated via the graphical admin interface: normal, inverted, left, right (donors version only);

OSS: Databases Microconference, Overview of SELF 2019, Linux Security Summit North America, EuroPython

  • Databases Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Databases Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Linux plumbing is heavily important to those who implement databases and their users who expect fast and durable data handling. Durability is a promise never to lose data after advising a user of a successful update, even in the face of power loss. It requires a full-stack solution from the application to the database, then to Linux (filesystem, VFS, block interface, driver), and on to the hardware. Fast means getting a database user a response in less that tens of milliseconds, which requires that Linux filesystems, memory and CPU management, and the networking stack do everything with the utmost effectiveness and efficiency.

  • Ten Years of "Linux in the GNU/South": an Overview of SELF 2019

    The tenth annual SouthEast LinuxFest (SELF) was held on the weekend of June 14–16 at the Sheraton Charlotte Airport Hotel in Charlotte, North Carolina. Still running strong, SELF serves partially as a replacement for the Atlanta Linux Showcase, a former conference for all things Linux in the southeastern United States. Since 2009, the conference has provided a venue for those living in the southeastern United States to come and listen to talks by speakers who all share a passion for using Linux-based operating systems and free and open-source software (FOSS). Although some of my praises of the conference are not exclusive to SELF, the presence of such a conference in the "GNU/South" has the long-term potential to have a significant effect on the Linux and FOSS community. Despite facing several challenges along the way, SELF's current success is the result of what is now ten years of hard work by the conference organizers, who currently are led by Jeremy Sands, one of the founding members of the conference. Scanning through the materials for SELF 2019, however, there is no mention that this year's conference marked a decade of "Linux in the GNU/South". It actually wasn't until the conference already was over that I realized this marked SELF's decennial anniversary. I initially asked myself why this wasn't front and center on event advertisements, but looking back on SELF, neglecting questions such as "how long have we been going?" and instead focusing on "what is going on now?" and "where do we go from here?" speaks to the admirable spirit and focus of the conference and its attendees. This focus on the content of SELF rather than SELF itself shows the true passion for the Linux community rather than any particular organization or institution that benefits off the community. Another element worthy of praise is SELF's "all are welcome" atmosphere. Whether attendees were met with feelings of excitement to return to an event they waited 362 days for or a sense of apprehension as they stepped down the L-shaped hall of conference rooms for the first time, it took little time for the contagious, positive energy to take its effect. People of all ages and all skill levels could be seen intermingling and enthusiastically inviting anybody who was willing into their conversations and activities. The conference talks, which took all kinds of approaches to thinking about and using Linux, proved that everybody is welcome to attend and participate at the event.

  • Linux Security Summit North America 2019: Schedule Published

    This year, there are some changes to the format of LSS-NA. The summit runs for three days instead of two, which allows us to relax the schedule somewhat while also adding new session types. In addition to refereed talks, short topics, BoF sessions, and subsystem updates, there are now also tutorials (one each day), unconference sessions, and lightning talks.

  • EuroPython 2019: Mobile Conference App available
  • Invitation to the EuroPython Society General Assembly 2019

    We would like to invite all EuroPython attendees and EuroPython Society (EPS) members to attend this year’s EPS General Assembly (GA), which we will run as in-person meeting at the upcoming EuroPython 2019, held in Basel, Switzerland from July 8 - 14.

LibreOffice: “Tip-Of-The-Day” (Design), LibreOffice Quality Assurance and LibreOffice Appliances

  • Easyhacking: How to create a new “Tip-Of-The-Day” dialog

    LibreOffice is an application with a large number of expert features, and though aimed to be easy to use there are always surprising shortcuts to achieve a goal. We post every day a tip on Twitter, and with the upcoming release 6.3 there will be also a tip-of-the-day messagebox when you start the program. This post aims to show how such a simple messagebox can be implemented (the complete patch is here).

  • bibisect-win64-6.4 is available for cloning!

    The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce the bisect repository from libreoffice-6-3-branch-point to latest master for Windows is available for cloning at Gerrit. As a novelty, it’s the first time the bisect repository for Windows is built for 64 bits instead of 32 as in previous repositories. Future repositories will be built for 64 bits as well.

  • LibreOffice Appliances project (GSoC 2019)

    So I finally managed to build LibreOffice for armv7 and I have LibreOfficeDev on my TV screen right now. There’s a link to build instructions above and I’ll update it with the autogen flags I used. They’re somewhat arbitrary but yeah.

Andy Wingo: fibs, lies, and benchmarks

I collected these numbers on my i7-7500U CPU @ 2.70GHz 2-core laptop, with no particular performance tuning, running each benchmark 10 times, waiting 2 seconds between measurements. The bar value indicates the median elapsed time, and above each bar is an overlayed histogram of all results for that scenario. Note that the y axis is on a log scale. The 2.9.3* version corresponds to unreleased Guile from git. Good news: Guile has been getting significantly faster over time! Over decades, true, but I'm pleased. where are we? static edition How good are Guile's numbers on an absolute level? It's hard to say because there's no absolute performance oracle out there. However there are relative performance oracles, so we can try out perhaps some other language implementations. First up would be the industrial C compilers, GCC and LLVM. We can throw in a few more "static" language implementations as well: compilers that completely translate to machine code ahead-of-time, with no type feedback, and a minimal run-time. Read more