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Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Community Member Monday: Iwan Tahari on LibreOffice migrations in Indonesia Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 6:07pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 6:05pm
Story Essential System Tools: Timeshift – Reliable system restore tool for Linux Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 6:03pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 5:41pm
Story Meet The Linux Desktop That's More Beautiful Than Windows 10 And MacOS Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 5:35pm
Story The Open-Source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Linux Driver Performance At The End Of 2018 Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 5:30pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 3:30pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 9:01am
Story When Linux required installation parties Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:33am
Story Try the Dash to Dock extension for Fedora Workstation Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:30am

IBM, Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • IBM selling Lotus Notes/Domino business to HCL for $1.8B
  • IBM Sells Off Notes & Other Software You Barely Remember, for $1.8B - Light Reading
  • Red Hat fiddles with OpenShift Dedicated and lures customers with price cuts

    The team at Red Hat has continued its toiling in the Big Blue shadow of IBM, and has churned out some tweaks to its OpenShift Dedicated platform and also sliced a few prices for the Kubernetes service.

  • Simplifies Kubernetes on AWS, Cuts Prices

    Red Hat is simplifying deployments of its OpenShift managed Kubernetes service on Amazon Web Services, as well as cutting prices and rolling out other upgrades.

    OpenShift is Red Hat Inc. (NYSE: RHT)'s platform for managing and running containerized Kubernetes applications; it runs on the customer premises or on any of 300 cloud and service provider partners, including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, IBM and Alibaba.

  • Kubernetes: Your Next Application Server

    In the Java ecosystem, we have historically been enamored with the concept of the “application server,” the runtime engine that not only gave us portable APIs such as JMS, JAX-RS, JSF, and EJB but also gave us critical runtime infrastructure for things such as farm deployments, configuration, load-balancing, failover, distributed management, and monitoring.

  • Lufthansa Technik builds digital foundation with Red Hat

    Lufthansa Technik, the world’s largest independent provider of airline maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) services, sought to create a digital platform for the aviation industry, AVIATAR. To support its development and operation, the company created a hybrid cloud infrastructure based on enterprise open source software from Red Hat. The AVIATAR team can now use agile DevOps approaches, automation, internal and third-party integration, and self-service capabilities to quickly iterate based on data and feedback. As a result, Lufthansa Technik provides an innovative digital platform that helps the world’s airlines optimise their operations.

  • Red Hat, Google: Open Source Collaboration
  • PHP version 5.6.39, 7.0.33, 7.1.24 and 7.2.12

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.13 are available in remi repository for Fedora 28-29 and in remi-php72 repository for Fedora 26-27 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.1.25 are available in remi repository for Fedora 26-27 and in remi-php71 repository for Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 7.0.33 are available in remi-php70 repository for Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPM of PHP version 5.6.39 are available in remi-php56 repository for Enterprise Linux.

    emblem-important-2-24.png

  • PHPUnit 7.5
  • FPgM report: 2018-49
  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2018/11

Security: Updates, ESET Post Turned to FUD, New Microsoft-Connected FUD, and SUSE CaaS Platform Patched

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Old and new OpenSSH backdoors threaten Linux servers [Ed: ESET is spreading/reusing/repurposing FUD against OpenSSH of the OpenBSD project. SSH itself is secure, but because some malicious actors make poisoned binaries with back doors we're supposed to fear; supply chains matter.]

    Nearly five years ago, ESET researchers helped to disrupt a 25 thousand-strong botnet of Linux machines that were saddled with an OpenSSH-based backdoor and credential stealer named Ebury. The attackers wielding it first performed a check if other SSH backdoors are present at the targeted system before deploying the malware.

    This spurred the researchers to search for and analyze these type of (server-side OpenSSH) backdoors.

    “Malicious OpenSSH binaries are quite common and have features that help us detect them among legitimate OpenSSH binaries. While, as soon as we got them, we used the samples collected to improve our detection, we only began sorting and analyzing them in 2018. Surprisingly, we discovered many new backdoor families that had never been documented before,” they noted in a recently released report detailing nine previously documented and 12 new OpenSSH malware families.

  • Feral Interactive Bringing DiRT 4 to Linux in 2019, Chrome 71 Blocks Ads on Abusive Sites, New Linux Malware Families Discovered, The Linux Foundation Launches the Automated Compliance Tooling Project, and GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.16.0 Released

    Cyber-security company ESET has discovered 21 "new" Linux malware families, and all of them "operate in the same manner, as trojanized versions of the OpenSSH client". ZDNet reports that "They are developed as second-stage tools to be deployed in more complex 'botnet' schemes. Attackers would compromise a Linux system, usually a server, and then replace the legitimate OpenSSH installation with one of the trojanized versions. ESET said that '18 out of the 21 families featured a credential-stealing feature, making it possible to steal passwords and/or keys' and '17 out of the 21 families featured a backdoor mode, allowing the attacker a stealthy and persistent way to connect back to the compromised machine.'"

  • Visibility is the key to prioritizing open source vulnerability remediations [Ed: TechRadar entertains anti-FOSS firm whose sole contribution is FUD because it tries to sell some 'solution'. The author writes about his own firm that also collaborates with Microsoft on this FUD.]
  • SUSE CaaS Platform Updated to Address Kubernetes Vulnerability

    For an open source project of its size (both in terms of code and of prevalence of adoption), Kubernetes has been surprisingly free of security vulnerabilities. Its perfect record has come to an end, though, with the project’s disclosure on December 3, 2018 of a security vulnerability in all previous versions of Kubernetes, and therefore, of SUSE CaaS Platform.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • The Case for Data-Driven Open Source Development

    Every year the number of Open Source companies and developer communities continues to grow. Open Source is becoming the de facto standard for software development as companies realize the cost, agility and innovation benefits. In addition to embracing Linux, Microsoft recently open sourced its entire patent portfolio to all member of the Open Invention Network. Companies are not only hiring engineers based on their Open Source Software (OSS) knowledge but also allocating 100 percent of their time to external projects. As a result, these projects quality and feature sets improve significantly which further accelerates their adoption in the enterprise. Very successful Open Source projects such as Kubernetes have helped define best practices for contributions (both technical and non-technical), communication (both online and offline), openness (Summits, Special Interest Groups, etc.) and governance (maintainer-ship, Technical Advisory Board, etc.). No need to reinvent the wheel, there are well-established frameworks for companies to work with.

    There is, however, one major problem that needs to be addressed: the lack of standardized metrics, datasets, methodologies and tools for extracting insights from Open Source projects is real.

  • In support of Coraline Ada Ehmke

    Last night, the linux.org DNS was hijacked and redirected to a page that doxed her. Coraline is doing extremely valuable work with the Contributor Covenant code of conduct, which many free software projects have adopted already.

  • Focusing on the simple things

    Which I guess shows that I could've spent the time thinking about an interesting concept on more pragmatic things, like testing the surveil script on another machine.

    Finally, I'm looking for a way to do testing; and I'm wondering of a good way to test that the command-line interface functions as expected as well.

  • Introducing PySide2 (Qt for Python) Snap Runtime

    Lately at Crossbar.io, we have been PySide2 for an internal project. Last week it reached a milestone and I am now in the process of code cleanup and refactoring as we had to rush quite a few things for that deadline. We also create a snap package for the project, our previous approach was to ship the whole PySide2 runtime (170mb+) with the Snap, it worked but was a slow process, because each new snap build involved downloading PySide2 from PyPI and installing some deb dependencies.

  • Quick Tip: SQLAlchemy for MySQL and Pandas

    For years I’ve used the mysql-python library for connecting to mysql databases. It’s worked well for me over the years but there are times when you need speed and/or better connection management that what you get with mysql-python. That’s where SQLAlchemy comes in.

    Before diving into this, if you are doing things that aren’t dependent on speed (e.g., it doesn’t matter if it takes 1 second to connect to the database and grab your data and close the database) then you can easily ignore this tip. That said, if you have multiple connections, that connect time can add up.

    For example, I recently had an issue where it was taking 4.5+ seconds to connect to a database, run analysis and spit out the results. That’s not terrible if its something for you only but if its a production system and speed is a requirement, that might be too long (and it IS too long).

  • Mopidy-MPRIS 2.0 released

    I’ve released Mopidy-MPRIS 2.0, the first major update to Mopidy-MPRIS in about 3.5 years.

    Mopidy-MPRIS is a Mopidy extension that makes Mopidy controllable from other programs on the same machine through D-Bus. This makes it possible to control Mopidy from various widgets in GNOME/KDE/etc, as well as with keyboard media keys.

  • I'm moving to the Red Hat OpenJDK team

    I'm very excited to announce that I've moved roles within Red Hat: I am now part of the OpenJDK team!

  • DataExplore – free Python based data plotting and analysis software

    DataExplore is an open source desktop application for data analysis and plotting intended for use in both research and education. It’s targeted at non-programmers who want to perform fairly advanced table manipulation methods. It also offers fast, dynamic plot creation from selected data suitable for publication. A variety of table analysis tools are provided.

    The software seeks to bridge the gap between graphical interface and command driven or programmatic approaches to data analysis. If you find it daunting to use RStudio, DataExplore might be a perfect fit.

    The software is written in Python and is based on the PyData suite of Python libraries. It works with Python 2.7 and <=3.4. It relies on pandas and matplotlib.

    The program allows quick visualization of data, table manipulation tools and supports large data tables. One advantage is the ability to load and work with relatively large tables as compared to spreadsheets. The focus is on data manipulation rather than data entry though cell editing and row/column changes are supported.

  • Automatic continuous development and delivery of a hybrid mobile app

    This makes Node.js an appealing option. Node.js is a JavaScript runtime built on the Chrome V8 JavaScript engine. It can make the API development backend very fast and easy, and it integrates fully with web technologies. You can develop a Cordova plugin, using your Node.js backend, internally in your hybrid app, as I did with the nodejs-cordova-plugin. This plugin, following the Cordova guidelines, integrates a mobile-compatible version of the Node.js platform to provide a full-stack mobile app.

  • Test and Code: 56: Being a Guest on a Podcast - Michael Kennedy
  • Episode #189: War Stories of the Developer Evangelists
  • EuroPython 2019: Venue and location selected
  • Create the about scene for pygame project
  • Seaborn Library for Data Visualization in Python: Part 2
  • Supercell opening new coding school (without teachers or classes)

    Instead, the project has been modelled on pioneering French school École 42. The three-year study program relies on peer-to-peer learning, with students organised into teams and tasked with various projects to demonstrate their skills.

    [...]

    However, the initial applications are only open to those aged between 18 and 30. Given the industry's ongoing battle against ageism, GamesIndustry.biz has reached out to Supercell to see if this will be expanded in future.

  • Supercell clashes games skill shortage with free new coding school

    Applications for the program opened this month, with the first 100 successful applicants due to start in September 2019. The course takes a total of three years to complete and is inspired by Paris-based nonprofit school Ecole 42.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Allwinner and Intel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 415.22 Linux Driver Adds Mainline Support For Vulkan Transform Feedback

    NVIDIA has released an updated stable 415 series Linux driver today. While normally their stable driver updates aren't too exciting compared to the beta development releases, this update is notable for adding VK_EXT_transform_feedback.

  • NVIDIA driver 415.22 is out for Linux, finally adding Transform Feedback support

    Finally, after waiting for a few months NVIDIA has released a new mainline driver which includes Transform Feedback support. Previously, you had to use their special Vulkan beta driver to get it.

    The "VK_EXT_transform_feedback" extension is one that was made especially for helping support translation layers from other 3D APIs. In our case, it helps DXVK plus Wine (and so Valve's Steam Play) with certain Windows games when run on Linux.

  • Cedrus Video Decode Driver Moving Along With Allwinner H5/A64 Support

    With the Linux 4.20 kernel the Cedrus VPU decoder driver was mainlined that was developed this year over at Bootlin for providing open-source accelerated video support for Allwinner SoCs. That driver continues to be ramped up to increase its usefulness.

  • Intel GVT Might Introduce Coffeelake Support In Linux 4.22

    While Coffeelake processors have been available for a year now, Intel initially didn't intend to support their open-source Graphics Virtualization Technology (GVT) with these chips but now are in the process of bringing up such support.

    This feature request has been tracking the Coffeelake GVT-g support request the past year. Initially they didn't intend to support Coffeelake nor Cannonlake but were focusing resources on Icelake and maintaining the existing Skylake/Kabylake support for this tech that allows KVM/Xen virtual machines to access the Intel HD/UHD Graphics hardware.

Games: Beyond Blue, The Stanley Parable: Ultra Deluxe, DiRT 4, Blackout and EmptyEpsilon

Filed under
Gaming

Wine 4.0 Reaches Release Candidate

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 4.0-rc1 is now available.

    This is the first release candidate for the upcoming Wine 4.0. It marks the beginning of the code freeze period. There have been many last minute changes, so please give this release a good testing to help us make 4.0 as good as possible.

  • Grab a glass, the first release candidate for Wine 4.0 is now available

    For those who like to guzzle a glass of the good stuff, Wine 4.0 just got the first release candidate. This also marks the start of the code freeze, the period where they stop working on implementing lots of fancy new features and work out all the kinks to have a stable final release.

  • Wine 4.0-RC1 Released With Updated Vulkan Support, Stream I/O Support

    As expected, Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 1 was issued today that also marks the code freeze leading up to the official Wine 4.0.0 release in January.

    Wine 4.0 will see weekly release candidates until the official release of Wine 4.0.0 is ready in about one month's time.

Best New Linux Desktop Environments

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Most Linux users have their own desktop environment preference. For example, I enjoy using MATE, where other users I talk with get a lot of value out of XFCE, GNOME or KDE. Yet it surprised me when I asked my Linux using friends what they thought of some of the "newer" Linux desktop environments.

About half of these Linux users have never tried any desktop environment outside of the ones mentioned above. Because of this, I thought it would be interesting to compare the best new Linux desktop environments making a name for themselves.

Read more

Tor Browser: An Ultimate Web Browser for Anonymous Web Browsing in Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

Most of us give a considerable time of ours to Internet. The primary Application we require to perform our internet activity is a browser, a web browser to be more perfect. Over Internet most of our’s activity is logged to Server/Client machine which includes IP address, Geographical Location, search/activity trends and a whole lots of Information which can potentially be very harmful, if used intentionally the other way.

Read more

LVFS and American Megatrends Inc.

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMI joins the LVFS

    American Megatrends Inc. may not be a company you’ve heard of, unless perhaps you like reading early-boot BIOS messages. AMI is the world’s largest BIOS firmware vendor, supplying firmware and tools to customers such as Asus, Clevo, Intel, AMD and many others. If you’ve heard of a vendor using Aptio for firmware updates, that means it’s from them. AMI has been testing the LVFS, UpdateCapsule and fwupd for a few months and is now fully compatible. They are updating their whitepapers for customers explaining the process of generating a capsule, using the ESRT, and generating deliverables for the LVFS.

  • AMI Is The Latest Vendor Joining The Linux Vendor Firmware Service

    The Linux Vendor Firmware Service has scored a major win in the trek of easily updating of BIOS/firmware images from Linux... BIOS/firmware vendor AMI has joined the LVFS!

    Red Hat's Richard Hughes shared today that AMI has joined the LVFS. AMI has been vetting LVFS, UpdateCapsule, and Fwupd for months now and are offering compatibility for updating their firmware using this open-source tech and providing guidance to their many customers on how to deploy firmware updates on this platform.

Linaro partners with IIC on upcoming 96Boards Industrial Edition spec

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linaro and the Industrial Internet Consortium announced a partnership to collaborate on open source Arm standards for industrial IoT involving OTA, TSN, and security, as well as develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec.

In September Arm-backed Linaro, which creates open source Linux and Android code for Arm devices and oversees the 96Boards open hardware standard, joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC). This week the IIC and Linaro announced a partnership to work on Arm industrial IoT (IIoT) standards.

Of particular interest is a plan to develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec. Other projects will include standardization around Over-The-Air (OTA) updates, Time Sensitive Networking (TSN), and trustworthiness (i.e. digital trust security systems).

Read more

AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With the very newest AMDGPU Linux kernel patches, the Radeon RX 590 is now working correctly on Linux. Here's a look at how this latest Polaris graphics card is performing for Linux games against seventeen other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards in a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan benchmarks.

AMD launched the Radeon RX 590 in mid-November as a Polaris shrink down to 12nm and featuring 36 compute units, a base frequency up to 1469MHz and boost up to 1545MHz, 2304 Stream processors, 8GB of GDDR5 video memory, and is rated for up to 7.1 TFLOPs of performance potential.

Read more

5 Screen Recorders for the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

There are so many reasons why you might need to record your Linux desktop. The two most important are for training and for support. If you are training users, a video recording of the desktop can go a long way to help them understand what you are trying to impart. Conversely, if you’re having trouble with one aspect of your Linux desktop, recording a video of the shenanigans could mean the difference between solving the problem and not. But what tools are available for the task? Fortunately, for every Linux user (regardless of desktop), there are options available. I want to highlight five of my favorite screen recorders for the Linux desktop. Among these five, you are certain to find one that perfectly meets your needs. I will only be focusing on those screen recorders that save as video. What video format you prefer may or may not dictate which tool you select.

Read more

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Now Rolling Out to Ubuntu Phone Users, Here's What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 is now rolling out to Fairphone 2, Nexus 5, OnePlus One, BQ Aquaris M10 FHD, Nexus 4, Meizu PRO 5, Meizu MX 4, BQ Aquaris E4.5, and BQ Aquaris E5 HD devices as an incremental update to the OTA-5 version released two months ago, which rebased Ubuntu Touch on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series.

"Ubuntu Touch is the privacy and freedom respecting mobile operating system by UBports. Our newest update, OTA-6, is rolling out over the next five days (completing on Wednesday, December 12). You can skip to "How to get OTA-6" to get it now if you're impatient, or read on to learn more about this release," said UBports in today's announcement.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Officially Released

Oneplus One improvements

The December 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2018 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Mesa 18.3.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.3.0

    Mesa 18.3.0 is now available.

    This release consists of approximately 1700 commits from 120 developers.

    Huge thanks to all the developers, testers and users for their ongoing work and support shaping up the 18.3.0 release.

  • Mesa 18.3 Released With Intel & Radeon Vulkan Driver Improvements, New GPU Support

    Mesa 18.3 is now available as the latest quarterly feature update to these open-source OpenGL and Vulkan graphics drivers for Linux.

    The Mesa 18.3 features are aplenty and on the AMD side range from Raven 2, Picasso, and Vega 20 support through RADV Vulkan transform feedback, faster RadeonSI fast color clears, OpenGL 4.5 compatibility profile support, and many RADV Vulkan additions. The Intel stack meanwhile picked up new PCI IDs, various Vulkan driver extensions, and more.

  • Mesa 18.3.0 for those of you using the open source drivers

    For those of you using Intel and AMD (and some older NVIDIA cards) Mesa 18.3.0 was officially released today.

    It has been three months since the last major release, so as expected this new and improved version comes with all the latest bells and whistles.

Linux Networking Performance To Improve Thanks To Retpoline Overhead Reduction

Filed under
Linux

One of the areas where Linux performance has been lower this year since Spectre came to light has been for networking performance, but with the upcoming Linux 4.21 cycle that will be partially addressed.

Linux networking performance took a hit from the introduction of Retpolines "Return Trampolines" at the start of the year for addressing Spectre Variant Two.

Read more

Mageia 7 Beta Finally Rolls Along For Testing

Filed under
MDV

It's been a year and a half since the release of Mageia 6 while finally the Mageia 7 beta images have surfaced.

The Mageia 7 Beta is shipping with the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, is running on the fresh Linux 4.19 kernel, provides the Mesa 18.3 3D drivers, and has a wealth of package updates compared to the state shipped by Mageia 6. Mageia 7 also offers reworked ARM support (including initial AArch64 enablement), DNF as an alternative to URPMI, and a variety of other updates. The in-progress release notes cover some of the other Mageia 7 changes.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Director v1.6.0 is available
    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.
  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed
    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance. FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."
  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports
    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion. In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K. [..] It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.
  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10
    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process. This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

OSS Leftovers

  • DAV1D v0.1 AV1 Video Decoder Released
    Out today is DAV1D as the first official (v0.1) release of this leading open-source AV1 video decoder. This release was decided since its quality is good enough for use, covers all AV1 specs and features, and is quite fast on desktop class hardware and improving for mobile SoCs.
  • PikcioChain plans for open-source MainNet in roadmap update
    France-based PikcioChain, a platform designed to handle and monetize personal data, has announced changes to its development roadmap as it looks towards the launch of its standalone MainNet and block explorer in the first quarter of 2019.
  • New Blockstream Bitcoin Block Explorer Announces The Release Of Its Open Source Code Esplora
    Blockstream has just announced a release of Esplora, its open source software. This is the software that keeps the website and network running. This new release follows on the heels of its block explorer that was released in November to the public. The company released the block explorer, and after making sure it was successful, released the code behind that block explorer. This way, developers can easily create their block explorers, build add-ons and extensions as well as contribute to Blockstream.info.
  • Will Concerns Break Open Source Containers?
    Open source containers, which isolate applications from the host system, appear to be gaining traction with IT professionals in the U.S. defense community. But for all their benefits, security remains a notable Achilles’ heel for a couple of reasons. First, containers are still fairly nascent, and many administrators are not yet completely familiar with their capabilities. It’s difficult to secure something you don’t completely understand. Second, containers are designed in a way that hampers visibility. This lack of visibility can make securing containers extremely taxing.
  • Huawei, RoboSense join group pushing open-source autonomous driving technology
    Telecommunications equipment giant Huawei Technologies, its semiconductor subsidiary HiSilicon and RoboSense, a maker of lidar sensors used in driverless cars, have become the first Chinese companies to help establish an international non-profit group that supports open-source autonomous driving projects. The three firms are among the more than 20 founding members of the Autoware Foundation, which aims to promote collaboration between corporate and academic research efforts in autonomous driving technology, according to a statement from the group on Monday. The foundation is an outgrowth of Autoware.AI, an open-source autonomous driving platform that was started by Nagoya University associate professor Shinpei Kato in 2015.
  • 40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019
    Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year. Which conferences do you plan to attend in 2019? If you don't see your conference on this list, be sure to tell us about it in the comments and add it to our community conference calendar. (And for more events to attend, check out The Enterprisers Project list of business leadership conferences worth exploring in 2019.)
  • Adding graphics to the Windows System for Linux [Ed: CBS is still employing loads of Microsoft boosters like Simon Bisson, to whom "Linux" is just something for Microsoft to swallow]/
  • Kong launches its fully managed API platform [Ed: Typical openwashing of APIs, even using the term "open source" where it clearly does not belong]g
  • How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters
    WHEN A MASSIVE earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant failed, leaking radioactive material into the atmosphere and water. People around the country as well as others with family and friends in Japan were, understandably, concerned about radiation levels—but there was no easy way for them to get that information. I was part of a small group of volunteers who came together to start a nonprofit organization, Safecast, to design, build, and deploy Geiger counters and a website that would eventually make more than 100 million measurements of radiation levels available to the public. We started in Japan, of course, but eventually people around the world joined the movement, creating an open global data set. The key to success was the mobile, easy to operate, high-quality but lower-cost kit that the Safecast team developed, which people could buy and build to collect data that they might then share on the Safecast website.

Security: Updates, Ransomware, and DNS Blame Misplaced

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Ransomware still dominates the global threat landscape
     

    Ransomware attacks continues as the main world’s main security threat and the most profitable form of malware, but a new global report indicates that despite “copious” numbers of infections daily there’s emerging signs the threat is no longer growing.  

  • Someone messed with Linux.org's DNS to deface the website's homepage [Ed: That's not "deface"' but more like redirect and it's not the site's DNS system but something upstream, another company that's at fault]
    SO IMAGINE YOU REALLY LOVE OPEN SOURCE; you've poured yourself a glass of claret from a wine box and have settled into a night of perusing Linux.org. You feel a tingle of excitement as you type in the URL - you're old skool - but that sours to despair as you see a defaced website greet your eyes. Yep, it looks like someone managed to get into the Linux.org website's domain name service (DNS) settings and point the domain to another server that served up a defaced webpage, which depending on when you may have accessed it, greeted visitors with racial slurs, an obscene picture and a protest against the revised Linux kernel developer code of conduct.

Tails 3.11 and Tor Transparency (Financials)