Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 15 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

'Cloud-Native'

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • What are cloud-native applications?

    As cloud computing was starting to hit its stride six or seven years ago, one of the important questions people were struggling with was: "What do my apps have to look like if I want to run them in a public, private, or hybrid cloud?"

    There were a number of takes at answering this question at the time.

    One popular metaphor came from a presentation by Bill Baker, then at Microsoft. He contrasted traditional application "pets" with cloud apps "cattle." In the first case, you name your pets and nurse them back to health if they get sick. In the latter case, you give them numbers and, if something happens to one of them, you eat hamburger and get a new one.

  • KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Copenhagen

    I attended KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018, Europe that took place from 2nd to 4th of May. It was held in Copenhagen, Denmark. I know it’s quite late since I attended it, but still I wanted to share my motivating experiences at the conference, so here it is!

    I got scholarship from the Linux Foundation which gave me a wonderful opportunity to attend this conference. This was my first developer conference aboard and I was super-excited to attend it. I got the chance to learn more about containers, straight from the best people out there.

Software: Continuous Integration, Curl, Browsh and Statcode

Filed under
Software
  • Continuous integration and delivery tool basics

    The CircleCI tool is admired for its speed. That's because CircleCI caches builds and can run tests in parallel over multiple machines. The net result is quick test times. It’s also appreciated because it can be run in the cloud or as an on-premises version.

    You can use CircleCI on almost any operating system or cloud. CircleCI is a single-page web application that makes heavy use of AJAX and HTML5. What you can't do with it is build Windows applications. While you can build applications using .NET Core under Docker with CircleCI, that's far from full Windows building or test support.

  • curl 7.61.0

    Yet again we say hello to a new curl release that has been uploaded to the servers and sent off into the world. Version 7.61.0 (full changelog). It has been exactly eight weeks since 7.60.0 shipped.

  • Browsh is the Text-based Web Browser You’ve Been Dreaming Of

    I woke up today to find my Twitter feed chok full of praise for something called Browsh.

    It’s a brand new, modern text-based web browser built for the command line.

    Yes, I did just say a text browser.

    And yes, the year is still 2018.

    So what’s got the geeks I follow gushing over something so terrifically niche?

  • Statcode – Get A Quick Explanation Of Various HTTP Status Codes

    If you’re a web developer, I’ve got a good news for you today. You can now stop spending time on Internet to look for what a particular response code mean. Say hello to Statcode. It is like man pages, but only for HTTP status codes. You can easily get the quick explanation of a http code within minutes, without leaving your Terminal. As you may know already, Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) response status codes are issued by a server in response to a client’s request made to the server. Statcode is written using Python programming language and works on GNU/Linux, Mac OS and Windows.

Red Hat News, Mostly APAC

Filed under
Red Hat

Minimum GCC Version Likely to Jump from 3.2 to 4.8

Filed under
Development
GNU

The question of the earliest GCC compiler version to support for building the Linux kernel comes up periodically. The ideal would be for Linux to compile under all GCC versions, because you never know what kind of system someone is running. Maybe their company's security team has to approve all software upgrades for their highly sensitive devices, and GCC is low on that list. Maybe they need to save as much space as possible, and recent versions of GCC are too big. There are all sorts of reasons why someone might be stuck with old software. But, they may need the latest Linux kernel because it's the foundation of their entire product, so they're stuck trying to compile it with an old compiler.

However, Linux can't really support every single GCC version. Sometimes the GCC people and the kernel people have disagreed on the manner in which GCC should produce code. Sometimes this means that the kernel really doesn't compile well on a particular version of GCC. So, there are the occasional project wars emerging from those conflicts. The GCC people will say the compiler is doing the best thing possible, and the kernel people will say the compiler is messing up their code. Sometimes the GCC people change the behavior in a later release, but that still leaves a particular GCC version that makes bad Linux code.

Read more

Best Bug Bounty Programs On Internet

Filed under
Linux

​The software revolution brought many opportunities for programmers. The modern software industry is not just limited to development. The developed software or service might have backdoors or glitches. These can cause vulnerabilities that hackers use to their benefit by exploiting such services.

Read<br />
more

We shall call him Mini-U – Ubuntu reveals tiny cloudy server

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has released a new cut of Ubuntu it recommends for use in the cloud and containers.

“Minimal Ubuntu” is based on either Ubuntu 16.04 LTS or 18.04 LTS. A Docker image of the latter weighs in at 29 megabytes. Images of the OS for the cloud are said to be “less than 50% the size of the standard Ubuntu server image, and boot up to 40% faster.” We think that makes them around 400MB.

Read more

Building hearing aids with a Linux-based open hardware board

Filed under
Linux

Since Opensource.com first published the story of the GNU/Linux hearing aid research platform in 2010, there has been an explosion in the availability of miniature system boards, including the original BeagleBone in 2011 and the Raspberry Pi in 2012. These ARM processor devices built from cellphone chips differ from the embedded system reference boards of the past—not only by being far less expensive and more widely available—but also because they are powerful enough to run familiar GNU/Linux distributions and desktop applications.

What took a laptop to accomplish in 2010 can now be achieved with a pocket-sized board costing a fraction as much. Because a hearing aid does not need a screen and a small ARM board's power consumption is far less than a typical laptop's, field trials can potentially run all day. Additionally, the system's lower weight is easier for the end user to wear.

Read more

5 open source racing and flying games for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games often are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

So, can someone who uses only free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely to ever rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Shippable's Software

    What's interesting is that Shippable isn't targeting developers for the Internet of Things or smartphones, ARM's typical base, but is betting that the reduced instruction set architecture is on its way to having a big impact in data centers.

  • Cloud Computing in HPC Surges [Ed: No, it doesn't. They just came up with this buzzword. These are still just servers.]

    According to the two leading analyst firms covering the high performance computing market, the use of the cloud for HPC workloads is looking a lot more attractive to users these days.

  • Clear Linux Now Supports Kata Containers

    At the end of last year the Intel Clear Linux project's Clear Containers initiative morphed into OpenStack's Kata Containers. Clear Linux now supports the resulting Kata Containers.

    Clear Containers had been the Intel / Clear Linux project focused on providing performant Linux containers as well as greater security through Intel VT-d and other engineering improvements. Kata Containers took that foundation and has evolved it under the stewardship of OpenStack and participation from many different organizations.

  • Episode 31 | This Week in Linux

    Linux Mint 19 “Tara” was Released. Elementary releases a Developer Preview for their new version called “Juno”. Kdenlive issues a request to the community for beta testing of the next generation of Kdenlive. We do a follow up on the EU’s Copyright Reform Directive, this time it’s good news, at least for now. We discuss the SUSE acquisition by EQT. Ubuntu Studio created a cool guide to Audio Production on Linux. Later in the show we look at what is coming for Xubuntu 18.10 and also the latest release from Redcore Linux. All that and much more.

  • Arch Linux at FrOSCon

    Yet another shoutout for FrOSCon, which will be held 25th and 26th of August. Arch Linux will have a devroom with talks so far about Linux Pro Audio and our general Infrastructure / Reproducible build.

  • Dolphin-Emu under openSUSE Leap 42.3

    A day after I formally announced my game console emulator repository, the Dolphin Emulator guys decided to merge a patch that makes Qt 5.9 mandatory. That means Dolphin is no longer compatible with openSUSE Leap 42.3 which comes with Qt 5.6.

    I take pride in myself for having a high-quality product, even if it’s just free video game stuff. Therefore my plan is this instead of simply disabling 42.3 and calling it a day:

    I’ll pick the last commit before that patch and build that Dolphin revision. Then I’ll disable the 42.3 target and build the most recent version for the other distributions. That way the last 42.3-compatible binaries stay on the download server until I remove the 42.3 target entirely which will be either when Leap 15.1 gets released or maybe even earlier.

GUADEC 2018 Report, GNOME Foundation Is Hiring

Filed under
GNOME
  • GUADEC 2018

    I’m feeling extremely grateful for the shot in the arm GUADEC provides by way of old friends, new friends, expert advice, enthusiasm, time-worn wisdom, and so many reminders of why we do this.

    I use FreeCAD for freelance work, and build the development version from git periodically. There is a copr nightly build for recent versions of Fedora, but not for Rawhide. The first person to whom I related this experience, David King, said the software would be ideal for the Flatpak treatment. Since then I’ve been getting a tutorial on building the YAML manifest, and after four days of hard work (thanks Dave!), it’s on the very brink of completion.

  • The GNOME Foundation Is Hiring

    Since its inception in 1997 by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero, who were university students at the time, GNOME has become one of the largest open source projects. It is best known for its desktop, which is a key part of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, Debian, SuSE and Fedora. The project also has a long history of producing critical pieces of software infrastructure: common parts of countless open source systems and its software is found in televisions, e-book readers, in-vehicle infotainment systems, medical devices and much more.

    GNOME has also been a key player in the social evolution of the free software community. By founding the Outreach Program for Women (OPW), GNOME pioneered a program to help make its community more gender diverse. That program expanded its scope to encourage more types of diversity and has been adopted by many other open source projects and has evolved into the larger Outreachy program = run outside of GNOME.

Linux Foundation: Xen 4.11 and Hyperledger Global Forum

Filed under
Linux
  • Xen 4.11 Improves Server Virtualization with PVH

    The open source Xen Project, which is hosted as a Linux Foundation effort, issued its first major release of 2018 on July 10.

    The Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11 release comes after months of development, and follows the 4.10 update that became available at the end of 2017. Xen 4.10 included some initial support for PVH (Paravirtualization Hardware), which has been further extended in the 4.11 update.

  • ​Re-engineering Xen: The important open-source hypervisor gets remodeled

    Xen is open-source royalty. This hypervisor, which runs and manages virtual machines (VMs), powers some of the largest clouds. You know their names: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Tencent, Alibaba Cloud, Oracle Cloud, and IBM SoftLayer. It's also the foundation for VM products from Citrix, Huawei, Inspur, and Oracle. But, with the release of its latest edition, Xen Project Hypervisor 4.11, there are major changes under the hood.

  • Xen 4.11 debuts new ‘PVH’ guest type, for the sake of security

    The Xen Project has released version 4.11 of its hypervisor.

    As we reported last week, it’s more than a month late, but the projects leaders thinks it is worth the wait because this release delivers on an ambition to “create a cleaner architecture for core technology, less code and a smaller computing base for security and performance.”

    A big part of delivering on that is increased use of PVH – a type of virtualization that Xen reckons blends the best of paravirtualization (PV) and Hardware Virtual Machines (HVM). PV virtualizes hardware so a guest can offer kit not found on its host, but doesn’t use virtualization extensions in silicon. HVM can use those extensions and therefore offers each VM isolated emulated hardware.

  • Last Chance to Speak at Hyperledger Global Forum | Deadline is This Friday

    Hyperledger Global Forum is the premier event showcasing the real uses of distributed ledger technologies for businesses and how these innovative technologies run live in production networks today. Hyperledger Global Forum unites the industry’s most respected thought leaders, domain experts, and key maintainers behind popular frameworks and tools like Hyperledger Fabric, Sawtooth, Indy, Iroha, Composer, Explorer, and more.

Software: Topgrade, iWant, QEMU, WikiToLearn

Filed under
Software
  • Topgrade - Command Line Tool to Upgrade All Packages on Linux

    In this guide, we're going to explore an interesting tool that aims at making updates of everything installed on your system as easy as just running one command. This software is topgrade, it detects the tools you use on your system and run appropriate package manager to update packages.

    On RHEL family Linux distributions like CentOS, topgrade will execute the yum upgradecommand, this is dnf upgrade for Fedora. On Debian family, the equivalent command executed by topgrade to ensure everything is up to date is apt update && apt dist-upgrade. On Arch Linux, it will use run yay or fall back to pacman if yay is not installed.

  • iWant – The Decentralized Peer To Peer File Sharing Commandline Application

    A while ago, we have written a guide about two file sharing utilities named transfer.sh, a free web service that allows you to share files over Internet easily and quickly, and PSiTransfer ,  a simple open source self-hosted file sharing solution. Today, we will see yet another file sharing utility called “iWant”. It is a free and open source CLI-based decentralized peer to peer file sharing application.

  • QEMU 3.0 Is Being Prepared For Release In August

    The march to QEMU 3.0 is now underway following discussions at the end of last year for jumping to the v3.0 milestone after the long-running v2.x series. The first release candidate is now available and marks a hard feature freeze for the QEMU 3.0 milestone.

    QEMU 3.0-RC0 was just tagged, which marks the first release candidate and hard feature freeze -- the soft feature freeze had begun last week.

  • WikiToLearn web app course editor almost done

    Hi, it’s a bit of time that I didn’t write a blog post and many things on WikiToLearn ecosystem happened. Course editor mode is almost finished: now you can add, remove and edit chapter on a course, with new revamped Dialog and Modal components for confirming and editing views. You can see it below in action.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat targets regional system integrators through program launch

    Red Hat has launched an Asia Pacific (APAC) program targeted at helping system integrators (SIs) build and modernise applications for the cloud.

    The new initiative is designed to allow partners to deliver new services at a lower cost and accelerate development for faster return on investment.

    Specifically, the Red Hat OpenShift Practice Builder Program has been designed to do just that, using the vendor's container application platform, Openshift, and a portfolio of enterprise-class application and integration middleware software products, JBoss Middleware.

  • Virtualize your OpenStack control plane with Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

    With the release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 (Queens) we’ve added support to Red Hat OpenStack Platform director to deploy the overcloud controllers as virtual machines in a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This allows you to have your controllers, along with other supporting services such as Red Hat Satellite, Red Hat CloudForms, Red Hat Ansible Tower, DNS servers, monitoring servers, and of course, the undercloud node (which hosts director), all within a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This can reduce the physical server footprint of your architecture and provide an extra layer of availability.

    Please note: this is not using Red Hat Virtualization as an OpenStack hypervisor (i.e. the compute service, which is already nicely done with nova via libvirt and KVM) nor is this about hosting the OpenStack control plane on OpenStack compute nodes.

  • ORock Technologies Achieves FedRAMP Moderate Authorization for ORockCloud

    As a Red Hat Premier Certified Cloud and Service Provider (CCSP), ORock Technologies architected ORockCloud as a "pure-play" Red Hat cloud that incorporates a suite of Red Hat's open source solutions for enhanced flexibility, security features and control. These include: Red Hat Enterprise Linux; Red Hat OpenStack Platform; Red Hat Virtualization; Red Hat Ceph Storage; Red Hat CloudForms; Red Hat Ansible Tower; Red Hat Satellite; and associated cloud APIs.

  • Will Investors Step Up in Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Chubb Limited (CB)?
  • Here’s What To Do With Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), EQT Corporation (EQT)

Debian, Ubuntu and Kubuntu: Development, Infographic and KDE Plasma 5.12.6

Filed under
KDE
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian LTS work, June 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and worked 12 hours, so I have carried 3 hours over to July. Since Debian 7 "wheezy" LTS ended at the end of May, I prepared for Debian 8 "jessie" to enter LTS status.

    I prepared a stable update of Linux 3.16, sent it out for review, and then released it. I rebased jessie's linux package on this, but didn't yet upload it.

  • Graphical environments in the world of IoT

    The IoT promises to bring about a revolution in the way we interact with devices around us. While many IoT devices will be hidden away, from sensors that measure manufacturing tolerances in a factory to hubs that control lighting around the home, there are a class of devices that need to provide some sort of graphical output or display to the user. Some examples include digital signage, interactive kiosks, automotive in-car entertainment gateways, smart meters, and the plethora of display screens seen on everything from washing machines to smart thermostats. All of these examples need some way to output graphics to a screen display but in an embedded environment that is not always easy.

    Linux is one of the most popular OS choices for manufacturers and solution providers to use in IoT devices and with it there are a few options available for graphical environments. From custom software to drive the display, through direct frame buffer access with toolkits such as QT, to a full X windowing server. All of these options have their pros and cons and often it is a trade-off between custom software and off-the-shelf components to speed up development. Custom software takes time and requires developers to continue to maintain a code base for the lifetime of the device, while using a graphical toolkit such as QT requires less code but comes with commercial licencing. The open source X windowing server is a popular choice but, being over 30 years old, has some shortcomings. It has been well documented that the design of X windows, although revolutionary at the time, has some security risks especially around application isolation and privilege escalation which has led to efforts to replace it by redesigning the graphical server from the ground up. One such effort is Mir.

  • Canonical releases new infographic to show how Ubuntu Linux 'connects everything'

    To highlight the ubiquitous nature of Ubuntu in particular, Canonical today releases an all-new infographic showing how this distribution "connects everything." I urge you to give it a look, as it will open your eyes to just how important Ubuntu -- and Linux overall -- really is. Apparently, this is an update to a previous infographic released in 2016, refreshed for 2018 following the release of Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver.

  • This Infographic Reveals the Sheer Scale of Ubuntu’s Success

    Ever wondered just how widely used Ubuntu is? Well, wonder no more! Canonical has put together a new infographic to highlight the scale and success Ubuntu has achieved across an enviable assortment of computing sectors. And it’s compelling stuff.

  • Infographic: Ubuntu Linux Is Used by Millions Worldwide and Connects Everything

    Canonical has shared with us today a new infographic that shows how their Ubuntu Linux operating system is being used all over the world by big-name companies the offer their services to millions of consumers.

    More than two years ago, when Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was released, Canonical put together an infographic to show the world how many people use Ubuntu and on which devices. With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) out the door this year, they did it again and published a brand-new infographic to show the world that Ubuntu and Linux are everywhere.

  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Users Can Now Update to the KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS Desktop

    The Kubuntu team announced today the immediate availability of the latest KDE Plasma 5.12.6 LTS desktop environment for the Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series.

    Released on April 26, 2018, Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system is supported for three years with software and security updates, which means that is ships with the long-term supported version of the KDE Plasma desktop environment, KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source governance accelerates innovation [Ed: Evolution of the tactics by which anti-FOSS proprietary software firms, Sonatype in this case, try to sell their 'wares']
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 brings unified search of cloud and local
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 is ‘open goodness’ behind an enterprise firewall
  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs
    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over HDDs. DragonFlyBSD has recently been replacing various HDDs with SSDs in their build machines and other systems having an important presence in their infrastructure. Following these storage upgrades, things have been running great and ultimately should deliver a snappier experience for users and developers.
  • Binutils 2.31 Offers Faster DLL Linking For Cygwin/Mingw, Freescale S12Z Support
    A new release of the Binutils collection of important tools is now available with a number of new features and improvements. Binutils 2.31 contains work like direct linking with DLLs for Cygwin/Mingw targets now being faster, AArch64 disassembler improvements, MIPS GINV and CRC extension support, Freescale S12Z architecture support, the x86 assembler now supports new command line options to enable alternative shorter instruction encodings, and the Gold linker now supports Intel Indirect Branch Tracking and Shadow Stack instructions.
  • GCC 8/9 Land Fix For "-march=native" Tuning On Modern Intel CPUs
    The other day we reported on a GCC 8 regression where Skylake and newer CPUs with "-march=native" haven't been performance as optimally as they should be. Fortunately, that patch was quickly landed into the GCC SVN/Git code for GCC 9 as well as back-ported to GCC 8. In the GCC 8.1 release and mainline code since April, as the previous article outlined, when using "-march=native" as part of the compiler flags with GCC the full capabilities of the CPU haven't been leveraged. This affects Intel Skylake CPUs and newer generations, including yet to be released hardware like Cannonlake and Icelake.
  • ARM Kills Its RISC-V FUD Website After Staff Revolt
    ARM is under fire for the way it attempted to kneecap a fledgling open-source hardware project, and has retreated from its own line of attack after several days. ARM had launched a website, riscv-basics.com, which purported to offer “real” information on the rival ISA. As one might expect, the “information” on display was a bit less neutral than a visitor might hope for. Taking this kind of shot against an open-source hardware project also struck many in the OSS community as being in exceptionally poor taste, given how critical open source software has been to ARM’s overall success and visibility. First, a bit of background: RISC-V is an open-source ISA based on RISC principles and is intended to eventually provide flexible CPU cores for a wide variety of use-cases. By using the BSD license, the RISC-V teams hope to allow for a greater range of projects that support both open and proprietary CPU designs. RISC-V CPUs are already available today in a range of roles and capabilities. Despite some modest initial success, RISC-V, today, isn’t even a rounding error in CPU marketshare measurements. It’s certainly no threat to ARM, which enjoys the mother of all vendor lock-ins measured in per-device terms.
  • Python boss Guido van Rossum steps down after 30 years
     

    He lays out a list of things that the users will need to consider going forwards like who has banning rights and who inducts noobs to the core developer team, but its laid out in a context of ‘do what you want but keep me out of it'.  

    "I'll still be here, but I'm trying to let you all figure something out for yourselves. I'm tired, and need a very long break."