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Sunday, 22 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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More Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • A Look at Google's Project Fi

    Project Fi is a play on the term "WiFi" and is pronounced "Project Fye", as opposed to "Project Fee", which is what I called it at first. Several features set Project Fi apart from other cell-phone plans.

    First, Project Fi uses towers from three carriers: T-Mobile, US Cellular and Sprint. When using supported hardware, Project Fi constantly monitors signal strength and seamlessly transitions between the various towers. Depending on where you live, this can mean constant access to the fastest network or a better chance of having any coverage at all. (I'm in the latter group, as I live in a rural area.)

  • OnePlus 5 and 5T's latest OxygenOS Open Beta bring Google Lens support

    While the last OxygenOS Open Beta update for the OnePlus 5 and OnePlus 5T was a significant upgrade bringing support for Project Treble, the latest versions for both devices offer smaller changes.

  • Google EU fine over Android likely this week

     

    The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, normally makes such announcements on a Wednesday.

  • Moment of truth for Google as record EU antitrust fine looms

     

    It comes just over a year after the Commission slapped a landmark 2.4-billion-euro ($2.8 billion) penalty on Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc, for favoring its shopping service over those of competitors.
     

    The EU penalty is likely to exceed the 2017 fine because of the broader scope of the Android case, sources familiar with the matter have told Reuters.  

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Medellín WordPress User Group Celebrates Open Source CMS Platform’s 15th Anniversary

    Medellín is well known for its innovative technology scene, with many active software and information technology user groups. One of those is the user group centered around open source content management software WordPress. A year ago the user group hosted Colombia’s first Wordcamp function, supported by the global WordPress community, and the user group recently gathered to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the first WordPress open source software release that took place May 27, 2003.

    WordPress is an free, open source software platform that allows amateur and professional users to create websites without writing programming code. Over the years it has grown into a powerful platform robust enough to run enterprise websites in many cases. For example, Finance Colombia runs on WordPress software.

  • Training: Embedded Linux and Security training day – Reading

    Providing detailed hands-on training, it is targeted at embedded engineers looking for an introduction to key embedded Linux and Security topics.

  • Amazing solar panel device that could change the world goes open source

    An innovative and simple solar panel efficiency device has just gone open source in order to get renewable energy to those who need it most.

    When you picture solar power, you might think of the enormous Ivanpah solar power plant in California (the largest in the world) or huge tracts of land in other sun-drenched parts of the globe.

    But not everyone has access to such enormous grids and particularly in remote villages in developing nations, there is only a need for a single or small group of solar panels that could maintain maximum efficiency to sustain a family or the village itself.

  • Meet the man in charge of Arduino

    I went to visit the Interaction Design Institute of Ivrea – a school that was started just six months before I went to visit them – and they asked me if I knew someone who could teach electronics to designers and to ask this question to my colleagues at the Politecnico.

    I went back and they said “No! Teaching electronics to designers? For us?” Those were guys working on highly sophisticated FGPAs, so they didn’t care about designers. I thought about Massimo – he had a real passion for electronics and he worked as a CTO for an internet provider at that point in time. I said, “Massimo, you could be the right person for this type of engagement – they’re designers, you love design, and you know electronics.” I introduced Massimo to the school and they hired him. That’s how the story started. When he was teaching at the Design Institute of Ivrea, they started the Arduino project as a way to standardise the electronics projects the students were doing. I introduced Massimo to the school and they invented Arduino, so I’m sort of the great-grandfather to some extent.

  • pinp 0.0.6: Two new options

    A small feature release of our pinp package for snazzier one or two column vignettes get onto CRAN a little earlier.

    It offers two new options. Saghir Bashir addressed a longer-standing help needed! issue and contributed code to select papersize options via the YAML header. And I added support for the collapse option of knitr, also via YAML header selection.

    A screenshot of the package vignette can be seen below. Additional screenshots of are at the pinp page.

  • OpenMP 5.0 Public Draft Released

    The public draft of the OpenMP 5.0 SMP programming standard is now available for review ahead of the specification's expected stable release before the end of 2018.

    OpenMP 5.0 is expected to succeed the OpenMP 4.5 parallel programming standard in Q4'2018, but for ironing out any last minute issues and allowing more compiler developers to begin implementing the standard, the public draft is now available.

FUD, EEE, and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Kubernetes News

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • When Does Kubernetes Become Invisible And Ubiquitous?

    The sign of a mature technology is not just how pervasive it is, but in how invisible and easy to use it is. No one thinks about wall sockets any more – unless you happen to need one to charge your phone and can’t find one – and that is but one example of a slew of technologies that are part of every day life.

    Since Google first open sourced the Kubernetes container controller, inspired by its Borg and Omega internal cluster and container management systems, more than four years ago, we have been betting that it would become the dominant way of managing containers on clouds both public and private. The irony is that the people in charge of Google’s infrastructure were not initially all that enthusiastic in giving away such intellectual property, but the Kubernetes and open source enthusiasts correctly predicted that Google would get tremendous cred with the open source community and help create a Google-alike containerized private cloud environment and also possibly spread Google’s approach to rival clouds as well as helping its own Cloud Platform expansion by giving Kubernetes to the world.

  • Crictl Vs Podman

    As people continue to adopt CRI-O as a new container runtime for Kubernetes I am hearing questions from administrators who are confused whether they should use Crictl or Podman to diagnose and understand what is going on in a Kubernetes node. This is not one or the other — these tools are complementary, and this article attempts to explain the tools and examine when it is best to use each of these tools. If you take away one thing from this post, remember that Crictl checks the front entrance, while Podman examines the foundation.

    First things first. For those people who aren’t familiar with it, CRI-O is a lightweight, Open Container Initiative (OCI) compliant, container runtime for Kubernetes. It is designed to run any OCI-based container, it is optimized for Kubernetes and committed to being stable and conformant with the Kubernetes container runtime interface with each Kubernetes release. CRI-O is also now fully supported in OpenShift, Red Hat’s enterprise Kubernetes container platform. For more information on CRI-O check out the CRI-O community web site and blog.

  • BlueData Announces BlueK8s Open Source Kubernetes Initiative

    Kubernetes (aka K8s) is now the de facto standard for container orchestration. Kubernetes adoption is accelerating for stateless applications and microservices, and the community is beginning to evolve and mature the capabilities required for stateful applications. But large-scale distributed stateful applications – including analytics, data science, machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL) applications for AI and Big Data use cases – are still complex and challenging to deploy with Kubernetes.

RPM And Yum Are A Big Deal For IBM i. Here’s Why

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

By now you’ve probably heard about Yum and RPM, the new processes that IBM will use to deliver open source software to IBM i customers. But you may have questions about how the process works, and what the benefits will be. IT Jungle talked with IBM’s open source guru Jesse Gorzinski to get the low down on why the new tech is so important to the platform.

RPM, which stands for Red Hat Package Manager, is a piece of software created more than 20 years that allows customers in that Linux community to more easily distribute and install the various pieces of software required to create a working Linux environment. Over the years, RPM use has migrated beyond the Red Hat community to other Linux and Unix environments (including AIX), and has essentially become a de facto standard for distributing software in the open source world.

Read more

Also: Red Hat Announces Ansible Engine 2.6 with Simplified Connections to Network APIs and Automation across Windows & Cloud

New Facilities for System76

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • System76 Linux computer maker offers a sneak peek into its new manufacturing facility

    System76 has long been a Linux computer seller, but recently, it has transitioned into a Linux computer maker. What's the difference, you ask? Well, currently, the company doesn't really make its own computers. System76's laptops, for instance, are made by other manufacturers, which it re-brands as its own.

    No, System76 doesn't just slap its name on other company's laptops and ship them out the door. Actually, it works closely with the manufacturers, tweaks firmware, and verifies that both Ubuntu and its Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS will work well on the hardware. System76 then offers top-notch support too. In other words, the company isn't just selling a computer, but an experience too.

  • System76 New Manufacturing Facility
  • System76 Moves Ahead With Preparing To Manufacture Their Own Desktop Linux PCs

    Back in April 2017 was the announcement that System76 would begin designing and manufacturing their own systems beginning with desktops and to be followed at a later date by their own laptops, rather than relying upon whitebox designs that they currently retail with their Ubuntu/Pop!_OS-loaded PCs. The Colorado-based company is inching closer to fully realizing their goal.

    For a while now the System76 folks have been posting various pictures of their in-progress manufacturing facility while today they have shared more images on their blog.

Linux Development, Graphics and Linux Foundation

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Fedora Gets An Unofficial Kernel Based On Clear Linux

    While the kernel configuration is just one part of Intel's Clear Linux optimizations for their performance-oriented distribution, a Fedora user has taken the liberty of spinning a Fedora kernel build based upon Clear Linux's kernel configuration.

  • An Idle Injection Framework Queued For Linux 4.19

    Another one of the new frameworks slated for the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle kicking off in August is for idle injection.

    Right now drivers like Intel PowerClamp and the AMD CPU cooling code insert idle CPU cycles when needed on their own, in order to keep below an intended power envelope or thermal threshold. Rather than drivers implementing idle injections on their own, the idle injection code within the Linux kernel has moved into a dedicated framework to make it easier for other kernel users to deploy.

  • IT87 Linux Driver For Supporting Many Motherboard Sensors Is Facing Death

    While Linux hardware support for desktop PCs has advanced a great deal over the years, one area that continues to struggle is support for fan/thermal/power sensors on many of today's motherboards. This area has struggled with not enough public documentation / data-sheets from ASIC vendors as well as not enough upstream Linux kernel developers being interested in the hwmon subsystem. The IT87 Linux driver for many common Super I/O chips found on countless motherboards is unfortunately facing a downfall.

  • Mesa 18.2 Gets Extra Two Weeks Of Development Time

    Serving as the Mesa 18.2 release manager is Andres Gomez of Igalia. He's now pushed back the release plan by two weeks, although Mesa 18.2.0 still should end up shipping in August.

    Rather than branching Mesa 18.2 by week's end, which begins the release candidate phase and marks the feature freeze, that deadline will be pushed back to 1 August. That means there are an extra two weeks of developers to land any desired changes into this next quarterly Mesa feature update.

  • Tips for Success with Open Source Certification

    In today’s technology arena, open source is pervasive. The 2018 Open Source Jobs Report found that hiring open source talent is a priority for 83 percent of hiring managers, and half are looking for candidates holding certifications. And yet, 87 percent of hiring managers also cite difficulty in finding the right open source skills and expertise. This article is the second in a weekly series on the growing importance of open source certification.

    In the first article, we focused on why certification matters now more than ever. Here, we’ll focus on the kinds of certifications that are making a difference, and what is involved in completing necessary training and passing the performance-based exams that lead to certification, with tips from Clyde Seepersad, General Manager of Training and Certification at The Linux Foundation.

  • Xen Project Hypervisor Power Management: Suspend-to-RAM on Arm Architectures

    About a year ago, we started a project to lay the foundation for full-scale power management for applications involving the Xen Project Hypervisor on Arm architectures. We intend to make Xen on Arm's power management the open source reference design for other Arm hypervisors in need of power management capabilities.

A Proposal To Allow Python Scripting Within The GCC Compiler, Replacing AWK

Filed under
Development
GNU

A SUSE developer is seeking feedback and interest on the possibility of allowing a scripting language -- most likely Python -- to be used within the GCC compiler code-base. This would primarily be used for replacing existing AWK scripts.

GCC developer Martin Liška at SUSE is seeking comments on the possibility of adding Python as an accepted language within the GCC code-base. This isn't anything along the likes of replacing existing GCC C compiler code into a scripting language or anything to that effect, but is targeting at replacing current AWK scripts that are hard to maintain.

Read more

GNU: The GNU C Library, IRC Break, and GNUstep

Filed under
GNU
  • Intel CET With Indirect Branch Tracking & Shadow Stack Land In Glibc

    Landing yesterday in Glibc for Intel's Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET) were the instructions for Indirect Branch Tracking (IBT) and Shadow Stack (SHSTK).

    These Intel CET bits for the GNU C Library amount to a fair amount of code being added. The commit message explains some of the CET steps taken. The Control-flow Enforcement Technology behavior can be changed for SHSTK/IBT at run-time through the "GLIBC_TUNABLES" environment variable.

  • No Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup on Friday July 20th

    No meeting will be taking place this week due to travel, but meetings will return to our regular schedule starting on Friday, July 27th.

  • Graphos GNUstep and Tablet interface

    I have acquired a Thinkpad X41 Tablet and worked quite a bit on it making it usable and then installing Linux and of course GNUstep on it. The original battery was dead and the compatible replacement I got is bigger, it works very well, but makes the device unbalanced.

    Anyway, my interest about it how usable GNUstep applications would be and especially Graphos, its (and my) drawing application.

    Using the interface in Tablet mode is different: the stylus is very precise and allows clicking by pointing the tip and a second button is also possible. However, contrary to the mouse use, the keyboard is folded so no keyboard modifiers are possible. Furthermore GNUstep has no on-screen keyboard so typing is not possible.

Oracle Solaris 11.3 and Solaris 11.4

Filed under
OS
  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 34 Brings GCC 7.3, Other Package Updates

    While Solaris 11.4 is still in the oven being baked at Oracle, the thirty-fourth stable release update of Solaris 11.3 is now available.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 34 released

    Full details of this SRU can be found in My Oracle Support Doc 2421850.1. For the list of Service Alerts affecting each Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU, see Important Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU Issues (Doc ID 2076753.1).

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Open Beta Refresh 2

    As we continue to work toward release of Oracle Solaris 11.4, we present to you our third release of Oracle Solaris 11.4 open beta.

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Public Beta Updated With KPTI For Addressing Meltdown

    In addition to sending down a new SRU for Solaris 11.3, the Oracle developers left maintaining Solaris have issued their second beta of the upcoming Solaris 11.4.

    Oracle Solaris 11.4 Open Beta Refresh 2 is an updated version of their public beta of Solaris 11.4 originally introduced in January. They say this is the last planned public beta with the general availability release now nearing availability.

Security: Back Doors in Voting Machines, Two-Factor Authentication, Introduction to Cybersecurity, and Reproducible Builds

Filed under
Security
  • Top Voting Machine Vendor Admits It Installed Remote-Access Software on Systems Sold to States

    The nation's top voting machine maker has admitted in a letter to a federal lawmaker that the company installed remote-access software on election-management systems it sold over a period of six years, raising questions about the security of those systems and the integrity of elections that were conducted with them.

    In a letter sent to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) in April and obtained recently by Motherboard, Election Systems and Software acknowledged that it had "provided pcAnywhere remote connection software … to a small number of customers between 2000 and 2006," which was installed on the election-management system ES&S sold them.

    The statement contradicts what the company told me and fact checkers for a story I wrote for the New York Times in February. At that time, a spokesperson said ES&S had never installed pcAnywhere on any election system it sold. "None of the employees, … including long-tenured employees, has any knowledge that our voting systems have ever been sold with remote-access software," the spokesperson said.

  • PSA: Make Sure You Have a Backup for Two-Factor Authentication
  • An Introduction to Cybersecurity: The First Five Steps

    You read all these headlines about the latest data breaches, and you worry your organization could be next.

    After all, if TalkTalk, Target, and Equifax can’t keep their data safe, what chance do you have?

    Well, thankfully, most organizations aren’t quite as high profile as those household names, and probably don’t receive quite so much attention from cybercriminals. At the same time, though, no organization is so small or insignificant that it can afford to neglect to take sensible security measures.

    If you’re just starting to take cybersecurity seriously, here are five steps you can take to secure your organization more effectively than 99 percent of your competitors.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #168

Mozilla and Google/Firefox and Chrome

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
  • BATify extension brings Brave Payments to Firefox and Chrome

    A new browser extension lets users support their favorite websites, and YouTube and Twitch creators through donations of BAT cyrpto-tokens via Brave Payments.

    91 weeks ago, I argued that Brave Payments would be a better product as a browser extension than a whole web browser. Brave Software has since made no indications that they’re interested in making a browser extension, and have instead scrapped their current Muon based web browser product and begun making yet another web browser built on Chromium.

    Browser extension developer Michael Volz, however, have detangled the attention tracking and contribution system from the Brave browser in a new unofficial Brave Payments client called BATify.

  • Chrome’s “Heavy Page Capping” To Alert Users About Bandwidth Heavy Pages

    Is your phone on a bandwidth diet? This upcoming Chrome feature will tell you when you are on a page that uses a lot of data. This is currently available as a flag in the latest Canary channel of Chrome.

  • Chrome’s “Heavy Page Capping” Feature Will Alert You About Data-heavy Pages

    Google is continuously upgrading its Chrome web browser to refine the user experience. This time, Google has added a new feature named “Heavy Page Capping” in the Canary build channel that will notify users when a webpage is using excessive bandwidth.

  • The New Thunderbird Add-ons Site is Now Live

    As we announced last week, SeaMonkey and Thunderbird add-ons will now reside on https://addons.thunderbird.net. Add-ons for Firefox and Firefox for Android will remain on https://addons.mozilla.org (AMO). We wanted to let you know that the split is now done and the new site is live.

  • 360° Images on the Web, the Easy Way

    One of the most popular uses for VR today is 360° images and video. 360° images are easy to discover and share online, and you don’t need to learn any new interactions to explore the 360° experience.

    Building 360° views is not as easy as exploring them, especially if you want to make an experience where the viewer can navigate from scene to scene. Here is the solution I came up with using A-Frame, a web framework for building virtual reality experiences and Glitch, a creative community platform for building, remixing and hosting web apps and sites.

    I often teach students at my local public library. I have found the combination of A-Frame and Glitch to be ideal, especially for the younger learners. A-Frame lets you write markup that feels like HTML to produce 3D content. You don’t have to write any JS code if you don’t want to. And Glitch is wonderful because I can give my students a sample project that they then ‘remix’ to create their own version. Thinking about it, ‘remix’ is probably a better word for non-programmers than ‘fork’.

  • MOSS is Mozilla’s helping hand to the open-source ecosystem in India

    In a bid to support the fledging open-source ecosystem in India, Mozilla has started its Mozilla Open Source Support (MOSS) programme under which it will promote free software and open-source projects in India. Mozilla has set aside a total of around Rs 1.4 crore to fund India-based projects or programmes supporting open source in the current year. Jochai Ben-Avie, Senior Global Policy Manager of Mozilla Corporation, told ET that Mozilla was born out of the free software and open source movement. As a result, the programme started with the effort to give back to those communities, along with supporting other free software and open-source projects and helping advance those projects around the world. “India has always been a really important country for development, and also for Mozilla. As part of the opensource ecosystem, we have a lot of volunteer contributors around 30,000 of them out of which close to 10,000-20,000 are in India. So India is by far our largest community,” said Ben-Avie. He added that the firm wants to give back to the ecosystem and to the open-source movement in India through this programme.

  • How to help test the 2018 edition

    An edition brings together the features that have landed into a clear package, with fully updated documentation and tooling. By the end of the year we are planning to release the 2018 edition, our first since the Rust 1.0 release. You can currently opt-in to a preview of the 2018 edition to try it out and help test it.

    In fact, we really need help testing it out! Once you’ve turned it on and seen its wonderful new features, what then? Here we’ve got some specific things we’d like you to test.

Shedbuilt GNU/Linux: An Educational Distro Exclusively for ARM Boards

Filed under
Interviews

Shedbuilt is a new Linux distribution created exclusively for cheap ARM boards. It’s lead developer Auston sheds light on this new Linux project.
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Should we celebrate the anniversary of open source?

Filed under
OSS

Open source did not emerge from a void. It was consciously a marketing programme for the already-15-year-old idea of free software and arose in the context of both the GNU Project and the BSD community and their history (stretching back to the late 70s). We chose to reflect this in the agenda for our celebration track at OSCON.

But that doesn’t mean its inception is irrelevant. The consensus to define open source at the VA Linux meeting and the subsequent formation of OSI and acceptance of the Open Source Definition changed the phrase from descriptive to a term of art accepted globally. It created a movement and a market and consequently spread software freedom far beyond anyone’s expectations. That has to be worth celebrating.

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Red Hat: APAC Ansible, and More

Filed under
Red Hat

IIoT platform extends from the cloud to the depths of a mine

Filed under
Linux

Advantech announced an IoT platform initially targeting mine safety that combines BTI’s “MIOTY” LPWAN sensor solution running on an Ubuntu-powered Advantech ARK-2250L gateway connected to a Hitachi IoT Service Hub running on Microsoft Azure.

Because Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) projects tend to be complex, multi-product endeavors, Advantech has lately been entering into IoT collaborations, such as its Embedded Linux & Android Alliance (ELAA) consortium and recently announced Solution Ready Packages (SRPs) cocreation program. Today at the Microsoft Inspire conference in Las Vegas, the company announced a new collaboration with Behr Technologies, Inc. (BTI), Hitachi Solutions America, and Microsoft on an end-to-end IIoT platform that will initially target the mining industry.

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