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More Intel Catastrophes and Bricking of PCs Due to Intel's UEFI

Filed under
Hardware
Security

Intel is Full of Holes

Filed under
Hardware
Security
  • A Security Issue in Intel’s Active Management Technology (AMT)
  • Backdoor In 30 Seconds: New Major AMT Security Flaw Is Here To Haunt Intel Laptops
  • Meltdown and Spectre FAQ: Crapification at Scale

    Yesterday, Yves posted a “primers on Meltdown and Spectre”, which included several explanations of the two bugs from different viewpoints; if you feel you don’t have a handle on them, please review it. Today, I want to give an overview of the two bugs. I will dig into the details of these two bugs in the form of a FAQ, and then I’ll open a discussion of the larger business and political economy issues raised in the form of a MetaFAQ. First, I should make one point: Meltdown is a bug; Specture is a class of bugs (or, if you prefer, a strategy).

    [...]

    What Are The Costs of the Meltdown and Spectre Bugs?

    A few billions.

  • Fixing Chipmageddon Will Slow Down Older Computers

    Microsoft has come out and said it: cures for the pervasive chip flaws Meltdown and Spectre are likely to dent the performance of your PC if it’s a few years old.

  • Intel needs to come clean about Meltdown and Spectre

    Intel hasn’t had the best of times recently. Meltdown and Spectre security flaws have helped reveal fundamental issues with processor designs over the past 20 years, and the software updates to protect PCs will have performance impacts. Even as I write this, it’s still not clear to anyone exactly how bad these performance impacts will be for older desktop systems, or how significant they’ll be to server-based cloud platforms. It’s all a bit of a mess, and Intel hasn’t helped with its lack of transparency. It’s time for Intel to stop hiding behind cleverly worded statements.

  • Intel details performance hit for Meltdown fix on affected processors
  • Keeping Spectre secret

    When Graz University of Technology researcher Michael Schwarz first reached out to Intel, he thought he was about to ruin the company’s day. He had found a problem with their chips, together with his colleagues Daniel Gruss, Moritz Lipp, and Stefan Mangard. The vulnerability was both profound and immediately exploitable. His team finished the exploit on December 3rd, a Sunday afternoon. Realizing the gravity of what they’d found, they emailed Intel immediately.

  • Intel's telling some customers to avoid its fix for the Spectre and Meltdown attacks — because of a big bug
  • Everything running smoothly at the plant? *Whips out mobile phone* Wait. Nooo...

    The security of mobile apps that tie in with Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems has deteriorated over the last two-and-a-half years, according to new research.

    A team of boffins from IOActive and IoT security startup Embedi said they had discovered 147 vulnerabilities in 34 of the most popular Android mobile apps for SCADA systems.

    Mobile applications are increasingly being used in conjunction with SCADA systems. The researchers warned these apps are "riddled with vulnerabilities that could have dire consequences on SCADA systems that operate industrial control systems".

The Top 10 Linux Distros You Never Heard About

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

As I have mentioned in previous articles, the open-source community is littered with many distributions – some of which you might never get to hear about if you’re not connected to an affiliated party or happen to come across a reference ad.

Plus, it’s a new year and we have been dropping Top 10 (and sometimes higher) titles since it began so you shouldn’t be surprised that we are here with another one.

In case you missed it, we recently published an article on The Top 10 Linux Desktop Distros of 2017, and I thought it will be nice if we checked out a couple of distros that might not have made it to the limelight in 2017 but are still significant and will probably be of great use to our readers.

Read more

Tiny module and SBC run Linux or Android on i.MX8M

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Variscite’s 55 x 30mm “DART-MX8M” showcases NXP’s 1.5GHz, quad-A53 i.MX8M SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4, up to 64GB eMMC, WiFi-ac, BT 4.2, PCIe, and HDMI 2.0, plus an optional carrier that’s also sold as a “VAR-DT8MCustomBoard” SBC.

Variscite unveiled a “coming soon” DART-MX8M computer-on-module and VAR-DT8MCustomBoard carrier board/SBC that tap NXP’s new i.MX8M SoC. The DART-MX8M follows other NXP-based DART modules, such as the i.MX UL based DART-6UL, which in November received a clock rate upgrade to up to 900MHz.

Read more

Debian vs. Ubuntu vs. CentOS vs. openSUSE vs. Clear Linux Post-Meltdown Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With Linux distributions being patched since last week's Meltdown and Spectre disclosure, here are benchmarks on some of the prominent distributions looking at their performance impact since being patched. Tested from an Intel Core i7 8700K system was CentOS, Clear Linux, Debian, openSUSE, and Ubuntu.

Read more

Wine 3.0 RC6

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.0-rc6 is now available.

  • Wine continues to mature with Wine 3.0 RC6

    The big Wine 3.0 is inching ever closer with the release of the sixth release candidate today with bug fixes.

    Since Wine is currently in a code-freeze, no new features are being pulled in so they can make the 3.0 release as stable as possible, which means it's not too exciting. Still, every software needs to go through a period of stability to ensure a solid foundation to continue improving features.

  • Wine 3.0-RC6 Released While Wine 3.0.0 Should Be Near

    The sixth weekly release candidate of the upcoming Wine 3.0 is now available for testing.

    Being into the code freeze since the beginning of December, Wine 3.0-RC6 just continues the bug-fixing train. Wine 3.0-RC6 has a total of 14 known fixes ranging from Valgrind memory fixes to a Powerpoint 2017/2010 slideshow problem.

*buntu 17.04 End Of Life and *buntu 17.10.1

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) Has Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10 Now

    As of today, January 13, 2018, the Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system has reached end of life and it's no longer supported by Canonical with security and software updates.

    Released last year on April 13, Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) was the last version of the popular operating system to ship with the Unity 7 desktop environment by default. It was powered by the Linux 4.10 kernel series, Mesa 17.0 graphics stack, and X.Org Server 1.19 display server.

  • Xubuntu 17.04 End Of Life

    On Saturday 13th January 2018, Xubuntu 17.04 goes End of Life (EOL). For more information please see the Ubuntu 17.04 EOL Notice.

    We strongly recommend upgrading to the current regular release, Xubuntu 17.10.1, as soon as practical. Alternatively you can download the current Xubuntu release and install fresh.

  • Xubuntu 17.10.1 Release

    Following the recent testing of a respin to deal with the BIOS bug on some Lenovo machines, Xubuntu 17.10.1 has been released. Official download sources have been updated to point to this point release, but if you’re using a mirror, be sure you are downloading the 17.10.1 version.

    No changes to applications are included, however, this release does include any updates made between the original release date and now.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GTK's Vulkan Renderer Will Now Let You Pick The GPU For Rendering

    One of the features exciting us the most about GTK4 is the Vulkan renderer that will make its premiere. This Vulkan renderer continues getting worked into shape for GTK+ 4.0.

    The most recent addition to this Vulkan renderer is a means to allow specifying a device (GPU) to use for rendering, in the event of having multiple Vulkan graphics processors on the same system.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Patched Against Meltdown/Spectre, Adopts LibreOffice 6.0

    openSUSE Project reports today through Douglas DeMaio that the openSUSE Tumbleweed software repositories have been flooded this week by four new snapshots that brought updated components and other improvements.

    According to the developer, much of the efforts of the openSUSE Tumbleweed's maintainers were focused this week on patching the recently unearthed Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that put billions of devices at risk of attacks by allowing unprivileged attackers to steal your sensitive data from memory.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2017
  • Debian/TeX Live 2017.20180110-1 – the big rework

    In short succession a new release of TeX Live for Debian – what could that bring? While there are not a lot of new and updated packages, there is a lot of restructuring of the packages in Debian, mostly trying to placate the voices that the TeX Live packages are getting bigger and bigger and bigger (which is true). In this release we have introduce two measures to allow for smaller installations: optional font package dependencies and downgrade of the -doc packages to suggests.

Linux in Cars and Watches

Filed under
Linux
  • Here’s every company developing self-driving car tech at CES 2018

    Then there’s a fleet of companies with new interfaces to facilitate how you interact with your car (human-machine interaction, or HMI – because, of course, there’s an acronym), as well as a small armada working on automotive-grade Linux, which pretty much everyone seems to think is going to be at the heart of every self-driving vehicle someday. Sorry, Windows.

  • Verizon now rolling out Gear S3 update with Tizen 3.0 and battery bug fix

    Verizon, one of the big mobile and data wireless carriers in the US, is currently rolling out a new software update for the Gear S3 and Gear S3 Frontier smartwatches. The updates are for Tizen 3.0.0.1 and, from the feedback we’ve received, it looks like the updates also contain the recent battery bug fix that was released by Samsung.

Servers: Concurrency, Purism, InSpec, Kubernetes, Docker/Containers

Filed under
Server
  • Thinking Concurrently: How Modern Network Applications Handle Multiple Connections

    The idea behind a process is fairly simple. A running program consists of not only executing code, but also data and some context. Because the code, data and context all exist in memory, the operating system can switch from one process to another very quickly. This combination of code + data + context is known as a "process", and it's the basis for how Linux systems work.

    When you start your Linux box, it has a single process. That process then "forks" itself, such that two identical processes are running. The second ("child") process reads new code, data and context ("exec"), and thus starts running a new process. This continues throughout the time that a system is running. When you execute a new program on the command line with & at the end of the line, you're forking the shell process and then exec'ing your desired program in its place.

  • New Purist Services – Standard Web Services Done Ethically

    When you sign up for a communication service, you are typically volunteering to store your personal, unencrypted data on someone else’s remote server farm. You have no way of ensuring that your data is safe or how it is being used by the owner of the server. However, online services are incredibly convenient especially when you have multiple devices.

  • Automated compliance testing with InSpec

    Don't equate compliance through certification with security, because compliance and security are not the same. We look at automated compliance testing with InSpec for the secure operation of enterprise IT.

  • How the Kubernetes Certification Ensures Interoperability

    Dan Kohn, executive director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, has called the launch of the new Kubernetes service provider certification program the most significant announcement yet made by the Foundation around the open source container orchestration engine.

    On this new episode of The New Stack Makers from KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2017, we’ll learn more from Kohn and William Denniss, a product manager at Google, about how the program can help ensure interoperability and why that’s so important.

  • Container Structure Tests: Unit Tests for Docker Images

    Usage of containers in software applications is on the rise, and with their increasing usage in production comes a need for robust testing and validation. Containers provide great testing environments, but actually validating the structure of the containers themselves can be tricky. The Docker toolchain provides us with easy ways to interact with the container images themselves, but no real way of verifying their contents. What if we want to ensure a set of commands runs successfully inside of our container, or check that certain files are in the correct place with the correct contents, before shipping?

  • Prometheus vs. Heapster vs. Kubernetes Metrics APIs

    In this blog post, I will try to explain the relation between Prometheus, Heapster, as well as the Kubernetes metrics APIs and conclude with the recommended way how to autoscale workloads on Kubernetes.

  • Google Introduces Open Source Framework For Testing Docker Images

    Google has announced a new framework designed to help developers conduct unit tests on Docker container images. 

    The Container Structure Test gives enterprises a way to verify the structure and contents of individual containers to ensure that everything is as it should be before shipping to production, the company said in the company’s Open Source blog Jan. 9. 

    Google has been using the framework to test containers internally for more than a year and has released it publicly because it offers an easier way to validate the structure of Docker containers than other approaches, the company said.

Linux Foundation's Work on SPDX and Work for Microsoft

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • SPDX clears confusion around software licenses

    Around this time every year, our minds turn to copyright. Or maybe they turn more to copyright. After all, open source works because of copyright law. As you may already know, copyright laws give the authors of works the exclusive right to copy (among other things) their work. These rights attach as soon as the work is fixed in a tangible medium (written down, saved to disk, etc.). So the rights that open source licenses grant rely on copyright law.

    But what rights are specifically granted? That depends on which license the developer selects. Most projects use one of a few standard licenses, but they're not always clearly communicated. For example, a project may be released under "the GNU General Public License (GPL)." But which version? And can the recipient choose a later version if they wish?

    The Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) is a Linux Foundation project to help reduce the ambiguity of software by defining standards for reporting information. The license is one such piece of information. SPDX provides a format for listing the specific license variant and version that applies to a software package. With over 300 licenses, you're likely to find the one you use. The License List contains a human-friendly name, a short name, and a link to the full license text. SPDX also provides guidelines for matching the text of a license file to the official text of the license.

  • The Linux Foundation announces Linux on Azure training course to speed with Linux and vice versa

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced on Thursday the availability of a new training course, LFS205 – Administering Linux on Azure.

    A large number of the virtual machines running in Azure are utilizing the Linux operating system. Both Linux and Azure professionals should make sure they know how to manage Linux workloads in an Azure environment as this trend is likely to continue.

  • The Linux Foundation launches 'Administering Linux on Azure' training course

    Linux is very much mainstream nowadays. What was once viewed as a hobby and niche project, is transforming the world. Many of the world's servers are running Linux-based operating systems. Hell, the most popular mobile operating system on the planet, Android, is Linux-based. Even closed-source champion Microsoft is embracing Linux by integrating it into Windows 10 and offering it on its Azure platform.

  • 4 Days Left to Submit Your Proposal for Open Networking Summit NA 2018

    The call for proposals deadline is quickly approaching! With more than 2000 attendees expected at this year’s event, submit before Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 11:59pm PST to share your ideas and expertise with the open networking community.

Linux and Graphics (Phoronix)

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd 237 Will Have Support For WireGuard

    The next release of systemd, v237, will introduce support for WireGuard. WireGuard as a reminder is the effort to provide a fast, modern and secure VPN tunnel that eventually plans to be part of the mainline Linux kernel.

    Systemd's networkd component recently merged patches for supporting WireGuard that have been in the works since September 2016. From the systemd perspective it's implementing support for the new "wireguard" interface type and supporting key management.

  • Some Of The Other Changes Slated For Linux 4.16

    There's still a week and a half to go until the Linux 4.15.0 stable kernel release is expected and that rings in the Linux 4.16 merge window. On top of various Linux 4.16 changes already talked about, here's a look at some of the other kernel features/additions expected for this next release cycle.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Planning For Release Next Month

    Ongoing Wayland/Weston release manager Bryce Harrington of Samsung's Open-Source Group has laid out plans for the next releases of Wayland and the reference Weston compositor.

    It's been a half-year since the release of Wayland 1.14 and Weston 3.0, so Bryce is trying to build up interest in getting out new releases in the weeks ahead.

  • NVIDIA Contributes Some New Tegra/Nouveau Patches

    It's not any re-clocking code or magical improvements for Nouveau's Pascal support, but on the Tegra side a NVIDIA developer has volleyed some new open-source patches.

  • Initial Intel Ice Lake PCH Support Posted
  • The Linux Graphics Stack Gets Further Meson-ized: Now With Libdrm Support

    The work on adding optional Meson build system support to the Linux graphics stack and other key open-source projects continues...

    Going back to last September has been work for Meson-izing Mesa as an alternative build system rather than Autotools, CMake, or SCons within Mesa. It's been delivering fast results and since the initial port landed more Mesa components have become supported by the Meson build.

  • Server-Side GLVND Updated While X.Org Server 1.20 Drags On

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat has sent out the second version of the ongoing patches for providing server-side GLVND functionality for the X.Org Server.

    Most of you faithful Phoronix readers should be familiar with GLVND, the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library. That's the effort led by NVIDIA and supported by others in the ecosystem for improving the "Linux OpenGL driver ABI" by allowing for multiple OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system without fighting over libGL.so. and the like. That's been going well but server-side GLVND for the X.Org Server takes things a step further.

  • A Look At Linux Hardware/Software Trends Over The Past Seven Years

    Here are some Linux hardware and software statistics going back to 2011.

Software: OpenGenus, StackEdit, Lightworks

Filed under
Software
  • OpenGenus Quark: The World’s First Offline Search Engine To Search Code

    You’re searching a code for your project online and the Internet connection is suddenly dropped. What would you do? Just sitting idle and waiting for the Internet connection to be back? Not necessary! Now, you can search your favorite code written in any language even if there is no Internet connection. Sounds awesome? Indeed! Say hello to “OpenGenus Quark” – the World’s first Offline Search Engine that helps you to search code for any algorithm or data-structure in your favorite language in seconds. Be it a C++ code, or Java or Python, OpenGenus Quark will instantly display a lot of sample codes in a matter of second. OpenGenus community is constantly adding more codes everyday. So if the code you’re looking for is not available, no worries! Just mail them and they will take care of it.

  • StackEdit – An In-Browser Markdown Editor for Professionals

    You might not have heard about PageDown before, but you must have heard about Stack Overflow and its sister sites. Well, PageDown is the Markdown library those services use. And it is also what StackEdit is based on.

    StackEdit is a full-featured modern, open-source Markdown editor and it is what is used by Stack Overflow and all its sibling sites.

  • New Lightworks RC3 Version 14.1 revision 102835 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!
  • Lightworks 14.1 Video Editor Steps Closer To Release

    The multi-platform, professional-grade Lightworks non-linear video editing system is getting close to releasing version 14.1.

Games: Civilization VI, Hex: Shards of Fate, Next Up Hero, Shoppe Keep 2, Cendric and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • The “Fall 2017” update for Civilization VI has finally made it to Linux

    I’ll mention it right at the top: there’s still no cross-platform multiplayer as of this update.

    Putting that aside, this latest update makes a few important changes to Civilization VI [Official Site]. Perhaps most notably, religion has seen a reformation of sorts with new units, pantheons, rules and balancing passes that have changed up how that aspect of the game develops. I noticed from a quick game that it’s now much easier to tell apart the different religions of missionaries and see how trade affects the spreading of faith. Likewise, in a similar vein, a lot of the game’s UI has seen a lot of changes for the better. The diplomacy screen has been overhauled and there’s all sorts of small touches that make it simpler to understand the information the game is throwing at you.

    The Khmer and Indonesia are also now in the game as part of a DLC pack. It also adds both a new wonder, Ankor Wat, as well as a natural wonder, Ha Long Bay. Like with the other DLC thus far, there’s also a new scenario included with special rules but, as of the time of writing this article, it’s not selectable on the in-game list. I contacted Aspyr about that omission and I’ve been told that they’ll look into it. Hopefully it’s just something that was overlooked and easily fixed.

  • Hex: Shards of Fate, a digital card game, has unofficial Linux builds available

    This rather fun trading card game has had unofficial builds that run on Linux for a little while now. I tried them out and it’s a pretty fun game, but don’t expect official support anytime soon.

  • Next Up Hero from Digital Continue & Aspyr Media won't be on Linux until the full release

    For those excited by Next Up Hero [Steam, Official Site], the new 2D action game from Digital Continue & Aspyr Media we have somewhat bad news, as there's no Linux support during Early Access.

  • Merchant simulator 'Shoppe Keep 2' to have Linux support at Early Access launch

    The developer of Shoppe Keep 2 [Steam, Official Site] has announced that Linux will be supported in their merchant simulator when it launches in Early Access.

  • Cendric, an RPG and Platformer hybrid will launch on Linux in March

    Cendric [Steam, Official Site] is an interesting discovery, a game this mixes platformer gameplay with an RPG and it will launch with Linux support in March.

    What's interesting, is that the game is open on GitHub, where a lot of the assets are under a mixure of Creative Commons licenses. Unsure about the code, since it isn't mentioned. The actual game engine is custom-made and is based on the SFML library.

  • Voting is now open for our Linux GOTY Awards

Red Hat and Fedora Articles/News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Top predictions for 2018 point toward security and innovation

    When thinking about future trends, it’s important to have a strong understanding of the important innovations impacting most sectors, and pair that understanding with an intuition around what impacts those innovations will have to most organizations in 2018.

    Innovation is crucial to federal agencies, but is muted when security becomes a factor. When it comes to impactful trends in the new year, it’s all about three things: security, security, security. Despite the fact that a Ponemon Institute study recently showed that the global average cost of a data breach is down 10 percent over previous years to $3.62 million, according CSO, the average size of a data breach increased nearly two percent. This stat signifies that security will continue to be a top concern for 2018, just as it was in 2017, and will be in 2019.

  • How inner sourcing saved our IT department

    Red Hat is a company with roughly 11,000 employees. The IT department consists of roughly 500 members. Though it makes up just a fraction of the entire organization, the IT department is still sufficiently staffed to have many application service, infrastructure, and operational teams within it. Our purpose is "to enable Red Hatters in all functions to be effective, productive, innovative, and collaborative, so that they feel they can make a difference,"—and, more specifically, to do that by providing technologies and related services in a fashion that is as open as possible.

    Being open like this takes time, attention, and effort. While we always strive to be as open as possible, it can be difficult. For a variety of reasons, we don't always succeed.

  • Red Hat, Inc.’s (RHT) stock price ends at $126.16 with performance of 1.33% on volume of 2098805 shares
  • Traders Secrets on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Nutanix, Inc. (NTNX)
  • Copr Modularity in retrospect

    his article is about the journey that we made since the Fedora modularity project started and we decided to get involved and provide modularity features in Copr. It has been a long and difficult road and we are still not on its end because the whole modularity project is a living organism that is still evolving and changing. Though, we are happy to be part of it.

  • 10 Fedora Women Days across the world

    Different topics were covered during the events, not only for people already familiar with our community but especially for newcomers intrigued by the open source world and willing to join the Fedora Project. This year we presented in Guwahati, Bangalore, Tirana, Managua, Cusco, Puno, Pune, Lima, Brno and Prishtina, spreading the word about Fedora and saying thank you to all the women contributors to our project.

    Even though the events were dedicated to women, everyone of all identities were welcomed to participate or give a talk. We are glad to see how much interest there was in these events in different local communities and how successful they were, making the decision easier for us to organize them again next year.

  • The Fedora 28 Wallpaper Contest is Open for Entries

    If you’re in any way creative, and want to give something back to the Linux community, here’s your chance!

    Fedora is on the hunt for a new set of desktop wallpapers sourced from the open source community.

    The distro invites open source enthusiasts to submit their very best photographs and illustrations for possible inclusion in the add-on wallpaper pack for its next major release, Fedora 28.

  • Submit Wallpaper for Fedora 28 Supplemental Wallpaper!
  • My FLOSS​ Year in Review

    Thanks to the Fedora Project, GNOME, BacktrackAcademy and the Linux Foundation, I was able to organize FLOSS events mostly in Lima, Peru. Besides that, I did a voluntary work as speaker in FLOSS workshops and IT conference in other parts of the world, being interviewed to reach more newcomers into the challenging Linux world, and do online training.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Deep learning wars: Is Facebook-backed PyTorch an answer to Google’s TensorFlow?

    The rapid rise of tools and techniques in Artificial Intelligence and Machine learning of late has been astounding. Deep Learning, or “Machine learning on steroids” as some say, is one area where data scientists and machine learning experts are spoilt for choice in terms of the libraries and frameworks available. A lot of these frameworks are Python-based, as Python is a more general-purpose and a relatively easier language to work with. Keras, Theano, TensorFlow are a few of the popular deep learning libraries built on Python, developed with an aim to make the life of machine learning experts easier.

  • Libre in Las Vegas

    It's no secret that Aleph Objects, by design, does not have trade secrets. As the makers of the LulzBot brand of 3D printers, our industry-leading transparency is born out of a passion for free software, libre innovation, and open source hardware.

    Every software tool we use to make our certified open source hardware is free software. Libre innovation encourages this kind of fanatical transparency, freeing us to share not only our bill of materials and internal assembly documentation, but even things like our research projects on our public development server. We confidently share everything that goes into our products—and more importantly, it lets us show you how they're made and how to get involved.

  • Ceph Day Germany 2018

    I'm glad to annouce that there will be a Ceph Day on the 7th of February 2018 in Darmstadt. Deutsche Telekom will host the event. The day will start at 08:30 with registration and end around 17:45 with an one hour networking reception. 
    We have already several very interesting presentations from SUSE, SAP, CERN, 42.com, Deutsche Telekom AG and Red Hat on the agenda and more to come. If you have an interesting  15-45 min presentation about Ceph, please contact me to discuss if we can add it to the agenda. Presentation language should be German or English.

  • #AWChat: How Prebid.org & Open Source Will Shape the Ad Tech Landscape

    Some wrapper solutions are built on open source technology, while others are proprietary. Today, we are here to talk about Prebid, the leading open source solution that enables publishers to quickly implement header bidding.

  • 20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

    Open source has officially been a thing for 20 years now. Did anyone notice?

    No, really. For something as revolutionary as open source, you’d think it would have changed the way all software is developed, sold, and distributed. Unfortunately for those party planners looking to celebrate the 20-year anniversary of open source, it hasn’t—changed software, that is. For most developers, most of the time, software remains stubbornly proprietary.

  • OPNsense 18.1-RC1 released
  • FreeBSD-Powered OPNsense 18.1-RC1 Released

    For fans of the pfSense-forked OPNsense FreeBSD-based firewall/network operating system, the first release candidate of OPNsense 18.1 is available for testing.

  • Top 5: Favorite Linux distros, retro gaming on Raspberry Pi, and more

    This week we look at how open source projects are viewed by college students, unusual tools for agile team development, setting up a Raspberry Pi for retro gaming, the future of Kubernetes, and our annual Linux distro poll.

Firefox Development News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Not every bit of code you write needs to be optimal

    It's easy to fall into the trap of obsessing about performance and try to micro-optimize every little detail in the code you're writing. Or reviewing for that matter. Most of the time, this just adds complexity and is a waste of effort.

    If a piece of code only runs a few (or even a few hundred) times a second, a few nanoseconds per invocation won't make a significant difference. Chances are the performance wins you'll gain by micro optimizing such code won't show up on a profile.

  • Making tab switching faster in Firefox with tab warming

    Since working on the Electrolysis team (and having transitioned to working on various performance initiatives), I’ve been working on making tab operations feel faster in Firefox. For example, I wrote a few months back about a technique we used to make tab closing faster.

    Today, I’m writing to talk about how we’re trying to make tab switching feel faster in some cases.

  • Firefox 60 Is The Next ESR Release, Introducing Policy Engine

    For those sticking to Firefox Extended Support Releases, the Firefox 60 branch will be the next ESR version.

    Firefox 60 will be an ESR release and the plan is to have the ESR 60.0 release out on 8 May, the Firefox 60.1 ESR release on 3 July, and to end Firefox 52 ESR on 28 August when releasing Firefox 60.2.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Leftovers

  • This Week in Rust
    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.
  • My trip in Cuba
    Olemis Lang is one of the founders and very active in promoting open source in Cuba. We’ve had some similar experiences in running user groups (I founded the Python french one a decade ago), and were excited about sharing our experience.
  • Mozilla Files Suit Against FCC to Protect Net Neutrality
    Today, Mozilla filed a petition in federal court in Washington, DC against the Federal Communications Commission for its recent decision to overturn the 2015 Open Internet Order.

GNU: GCC 7.3 and LibrePlanet 2018 Keynote Speakers

  • GCC 7.3 Preparing For Release To Ship Spectre Patches
    GNU developers are preparing to quickly ship GCC 7.3 now in order to get out the Spectre patches, a.k.a. the compiler side bits for Retpoline with -mindirect-branch=thunk and friends. It was just this past weekend that the back-ported patches landed in GCC 7 while now GCC 7.3 is being prepared as the branch's next bug-fix point release.
  • Announcing LibrePlanet 2018 keynote speakers
    The keynote speakers for the tenth annual LibrePlanet conference will be anthropologist and author Gabriella Coleman, free software policy expert and community advocate Deb Nicholson, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) senior staff technologist Seth Schoen, and FSF founder and president Richard Stallman. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for people who care about their digital freedoms, bringing together software developers, policy experts, activists, and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments, and tackle challenges facing the free software movement. The theme of this year's conference is Freedom. Embedded. In a society reliant on embedded systems -- in cars, digital watches, traffic lights, and even within our bodies -- how do we defend computer user freedom, protect ourselves against corporate and government surveillance, and move toward a freer world? LibrePlanet 2018 will explore these topics in sessions for all ages and experience levels.

Open Source in 3-D Printing

  • 17,000% Cost Reduction with Open Source 3D Printing: Michigan Tech Study Showcases Parametric 3D Printed Slot Die System
    We often cover the work of prolific Dr. Joshua Pearce, an Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering at Michigan Technological University (Michigan Tech); he also runs the university’s Open Sustainability Technology (MOST) Research Group. Dr. Pearce, a major proponent for sustainability and open source technology, has previously taught an undergraduate engineering course on how to build open source 3D printers, and four of his former students, in an effort to promote environmental sustainability in 3D printing, launched a business to manufacture and sell recycled and biodegradable filaments.
  • Open Source 3D printing cuts cost from $4,000 to only $0.25 says new study
    Slot die coating is a means of adding a thin, uniform film of material to a substrate. It is a widely used method for the manufacturing of electronic devices – including flat screen televisions, printed electronics, lithium-ion batteries and sensors. Up until recently, slot die components were only machined from stainless steel, restricting development and making the process expensive. Now slot dies for in-lab experimental use can be made on a 3D printer at a fraction of the cost.
  • Dutch firm unveils world's first 3-D-printed propeller
    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing technology has caught the logistics world's attention for its potential to save on warehouse and shipping costs by producing items on demand at any location. In the past two years, for example, UPS Inc. announced plans to partner with software developer SAP SE to build a nationwide network of 3-D printers for use by its customers, and General Electric Co. spent nearly $600 million to buy a three-quarters stake in the German 3-D printing firm Concept Laser GmbH. Recently, transportation companies have begun turning to the same technology for another application, creating the actual hardware used in vehicles that move the freight. For instance, in late 2016, global aircraft maker Airbus S.A.S. contracted with manufacturing firm Arconic Inc. to supply 3-D printed metal parts for its commercial aircraft.

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