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Saturday, 16 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:43pm
Story Software: GIMP, VLC, Cryptsetup, Caprine, KWin and NetworkManager Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:42pm
Story Linux Foundation: Servers, Kubernetes and OpenContrail Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:40pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora News Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:35pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:32pm
Story Openwashing and FUD Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:28pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 8:03pm
Story Cryptography in Ubuntu 16.04 and GTK2 Demotion Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 7:33pm
Story SparkyLinux Operating System Launches for Raspberry Pi, Based on Debian Stretch Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 7:18pm
Story Graphics: Radeon and Vulkan2 Roy Schestowitz 13/12/2017 - 7:08pm

Ataribox Pre-Orders Begin on December 14

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Gaming

The company behind the new games machine revealed the pre-order date in a (now deleted) Facebook post. It later uploaded an image teasing the date ‘14.12.17’ (pictured above).

Users will be able to “pre-order” the Ataribox through IndieGoGo, where the price for the console is expected to be start somewhere around the $299 mark.

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Ubuntu Devs Work on Demoting Python 2 to "Universe" Repo for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical's Matthias Klose informed the Ubuntu community in a mailing list announcement last week that getting the Python 2 interpreter demoted from Ubuntu has been an ongoing task for the last few releases, and that Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) is the first to ship with a Desktop ISO image that doesn't contain Python2.

However, the next step for them is to prepare to move the Python 2 packages to the "universe" repository in the next few months before the release of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system in April 2018. While Python 2 will be supported for only two more years, Ubuntu 18.04 is an LTS (Long Term Support) release supported for five years, until 2023.

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SysAdmins and Kernel Developers Advance Linux Skills with LiFT

Filed under
Linux

The annual Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) Scholarships provide advanced open source training to existing and aspiring IT professionals from all over the world. Twenty-seven recipients received scholarships this year – the highest number ever awarded by the Foundation. Scholarship recipients receive a Linux Foundation training course and certification exam at no cost.

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New Antivirus Live CD Release Is Out Now Based on 4MLinux 24.0 and ClamAV 0.99.2

Filed under
Linux

Every time a new major 4MLinux release is being prepped, Antivirus Live CD gets updated with the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source components that have been included in the respective 4MLinux release. As such, Antivirus Live CD 24.0-0.99.2 is based on 4MLinux 24.0 and ClamAV 0.99.2 open-source antivirus software toolkit.

"Antivirus Live CD is an official 4MLinux fork including the ClamAV scanner. It's designed for users who need a lightweight live CD, which will help them to protect their computers against viruses," said Zbigniew Konojacki in the release announcement‏. "The latest version 24.0-0.99.2 is based on 4MLinux 24.0 and ClamAV 0.99.2."

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LibreOffice 6.0 Coming Soon to openSUSE Tumbleweed, Along with KDE Apps 17.12

Filed under
LibO

A total of six snapshots have been released to the public this month, as OpenSuSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger announced this past weekend, and they brought lots of goodies, along with some of the latest GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software components. But first, there's been a bunch of more python2->python3 conversions lately that you should know about.

"For the ones that don’t know yet, the python2 -> python3 switches are especially of interest to SLE/Leap 15," said Dominique Leuenberger. "Minimizing the support surface for Python 2 in favor of Python 3 will lead to a much stronger, supportable product for the future. As Tumbleweed is the leading and trendsetting product, it is but natural that we get those changes as well."

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Linux Kernel 5.0 is Coming in the Summer of 2018

Filed under
News

Linus Torvalds reveals the silly reason about why there will be a Linux Kernel 5 hopefully in the summer of 2018. He also discusses the need for new Linux Kernel maintainers.
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Linux: 4.14.5, 4.9.68, 4.4.105, and 3.18.87

Filed under
Linux

Dedoimedo interviews: Tuxmachines

Filed under
Interviews

Dedoimedo prowls the many corners of the Web, searching for textogenic faces for a fresh new interview. Truth to be told, finding the candidate for today's slot wasn't too difficult. Roy Schestowitz is a familiar name round the Tux block. Nowadays, you will most likely find him on tuxmachines.org, a community-driven news site.

News aggregation can be tricky; finding the right balance of quality content isn't easy, but even with the relatively recent change of ownership, tuxmachines marches on with solid consistency, ardently trying to offer its readers the best the open-source world has to report. I have always been a great fan and supporter, and I approached Roy for an interview. He agreed.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software, Howtos, and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
HowTos

Distributions: Debian, Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • MX-17 Release Candidate 1 now available

    MX-17 RC1 images are now available for download.

  • Debian 8.10 and Debian 9.3 released - CDs and DVDs published
  • “Rock Solid” Debian 9.3 And “Lightweight” Bodhi Linux 4.4.0 Available — Download Here

    In early 2017, the Debian Release team pushed Debian 9.0 “stretch” release, which would remain supported for the next 5 years. Named after Toy Story’s rubber toy octopus, this release has just witnessed its third update in the form of Debian 9.3 (release notes).

    As expected, Debian “stretch” 9.3 ships with tons of security patches and fixes for some serious issues. Prior to this release, on various instances, security advisories for different issues have already been released.

  • 3rd Ubucon Europe 2018

    Yes! A new edition for ubunteros around the world!

  • HiDPI is Released!  Work on Initial Setup continues and the TryPopOS contest

    You can now plug in a LoDPI external display to your Galago Pro or you HiDPI Oryx, Serval, or Bonobo and expect it to just work.  The same is true when plugging a HiDPI display into any other System76 laptop.  No more complicated tricks every time you plug a second monitor in.

  • System76 Rolls Out Its New HiDPI Daemon

    Linux system vendor System76 has released their new HiDPI daemon for their laptops and desktops to improving the display experience on multi-monitor configurations.

    This HiDPI daemon is geared for offering a better display experience when using both HiDPI and lower DPI displays, e.g. a HiDPI laptop display paired with a lower resolution external monitor, a desktop with multiple monitors of varying resolutions, etc.

    Their HiDPI experience is built around X.Org for now until Wayland is mature and is tested for Intel/NVIDIA graphics given those are the GPUs they are mostly shipping at this point. This daemon will listen for monitor plug/unplug events and then configure the HiDPI/LoDPI experience accordingly, allow you to switch displays between different modes if the application in use doesn't support HiDPI properly, etc.

  • What’s New in Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon Edition

    Linux Mint 18.3 Cinnamon edition is the latest release of Linux Mint 18 series features Cinnamon Desktop 3.6 as default desktop environment. Cinnamon 3.6 is the largest and most important part of the Linux Mint 18.3 release. It includes loads of improvements, new features and bug fixes.

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu, Krita, GNOME Development

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Kubuntu 18.04 LTS Could Switch to Breeze-Dark Plasma Theme by Default, Test Now

    The latest daily build live ISO images that landed earlier today for Kubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) apparently uses the Breeze-Dark Plasma theme for the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment by default. However, we've been told that it's currently an experiment to get the pulse of the community.

    "Users running [Kubuntu] 18.04 development version who have not deliberately opted to use Breeze/Breeze-Light in their System Settings will also see the change after upgrading packages," said the devs. "Users can easily revert back to the Breeze/Breeze-Light Plasma themes by changing this in System Settings."

  • Interview with Rytelier

    The amount of convenience is very high compared to other programs. The amount of “this one should be designed in a better way, it annoys me” things is the smallest of all the programs I use, and if something is broken, then most of these functions are announced to improve in 4.0.

  • Grow your skills with GNOME

    For the past 3 years I’ve been working very hard because I fulfill a number of these roles for Builder. It’s exhausting and unsustainable. It contributes to burnout and hostile communication by putting too much responsibility on too few people’s shoulders.

  • GTK4, GNOME's Wayland Support & Vulkan Renderer Topped GNOME In 2017
  • A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support

    It's been four months since the release of GIMP 2.9.6 and while GIMP 2.9 developments are sadly not too frequent, the next GIMP 2.9.8 release is preparing a host of changes.

    Of excitement to those trying to use GIMP in a Wayland-based Linux desktop environment, GIMP's color picker has just picked up support for working on KDE/Wayland as well as some other Color Picker improvements to help GNOME/Wayland too. GIMP's Screenshot plugin also now has support for taking screenshots on KDE/Wayland either as a full-screen or individual windows. Granted, GIMP won't be all nice and dandy on Wayland itself until seeing the long-awaited GTK3 (or straight to GTK4) port.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • How Open Source Databases Unlock Faster Computing
  • The art of the usability interview

    During a usability test, it's important to understand what the tester is thinking. What were they looking for when they couldn't find a button or menu item? During the usability test, I recommend that you try to observe, take notes, capture as much data as you can about what the tester is doing. Only after the tester is finished with a scenario or set of scenarios should you ask questions.

  • This open-source interview approach will help you avoid unconscious bias

    The lack of diversity in tech has been front and center this past year. Large tech companies have publicly vowed to fix the problem. But how? One answer is recognizing, acknowledging, and eliminating unconscious bias from the hiring process.

  • Microsoft Goes All In With Kubernetes
  • OpenBSD Now Officially Supports 64-bit ARM

    OpenBSD has graduated its 64-bit ARM (ARM64) architecture to being officially supported.

    As outlined in the OpenBSD Journal with a change made this week by lead OpenBSD developer Theo de Raadt, OpenBSD's ARM64 support is now considered officially supported.

  • LLVM Clang 6.0 Now Defaults To C++14

    Up to now LLVM's Clang C/C++ compiler has defaulted to using C++98/GNU++98 as its default C++ standard, but fortunately that's no more.

    Clang's default C++ dialect is now GNU++14 version of C++14 rather than GNU++98 (C++98).

    The older versions of the C++ standard remain available and can be set via the -std= argument, just as those previously could have specified C++11 / C++14 / C++17, but now in cases where not specified, GNU++14/C++14 is the default.

  • Tor Browser 7.0.11 is released

    Tor Browser 7.0.11 is now available from the Tor Browser Project page [1] and also from our distribution directory [2].

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Shotcut review: This open-source video editor is impressive

Filed under
OSS
Reviews

Shotcut is an open-source, free video editing program that has been around for more than a decade. It’s not the most intuitive or professionally presented, but beneath its rough presentation lies a remarkably powerful program.

When you first start Shotcut, you might be surprised at what you don't see—very little of its interface is exposed in the beginning. But click on the buttons in the top bar, and you’ll find numerous views and UI elements that prove to be much more robust than you’d guess at first glance. They’re resizable and undockable, making this one of the most heavily customizable free video editing programs out there.

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Linux Kernel 5.0 Will be Coming in the Summer of 2018

Filed under
Linux

In the recently concluded Open Source Summit in Prague, Linux creator Linus Torvalds discusses sits down with VP of VMware and discussed the issues surrounding the Linux Kernel. I attended the event in person and even covered it in a live video on It’s FOSS Facebook page but since not everyone is going to watch the video for over 30 minutes, I am going to list some of the key takeaways from his talk.

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Linux 4.15 RC3

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.15-rc3

    Another week, another rc.

    I'm not thrilled about how big the early 4.15 rc's are, but rc3 is
    often the biggest rc because it's still fairly early in the
    calming-down period, and yet people have had some time to start
    finding problems. That said, this rc3 is big even by rc3 standards.
    Not good.

    Most of the changes by far are drivers (with a big chunk of it being
    just syntactic changes for some doc warnings) with some perf tooling
    updates also being noticeable. But there are changes all over: core
    kernel and networking, kvm, arch updates and Documentation.

    Anyway, I sincerely hope that things are really starting to calm down now.

    Also, there's a known issue with x86 32-bit suspend/resume that I just
    didn't get a good patch for in time for this rc. Soon.

    Shortlog appended.

    Linus

  • Linux Kernel 4.15 Gets Another Big RC, Linus Torvalds Says It's Not Good at All

    Linux Torvalds announced a few moments ago the release and immediate availability for download of the third Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.15 kernel series for Linux-based operating systems.

    If last week's RC2 was a "bigger than expected" one, than this week the Linux 4.15 kernel saw even more patches and it just got a quite bit RC3 milestone, which Linus Torvalds says it's big even by RC3 standards and it isn't a good sign for the development cycle, which could be pushed to the end of January 2018.

    "I'm not thrilled about how big the early 4.15 RCs are, but RC3 is often the biggest RC because it's still fairly early in the calming-down period, and yet people have had some time to start finding problems. That said, this RC3 is big even by RC3 standards. Not good," said Linus Torvalds in the mailing list announcement.

  • Linux 4.15-rc3 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds has announced the third weekly test release of the upcoming Linux 4.15 kernel.

    It's been a rather busy week in the Linux kernel space considering the RC3 space. The level of activity has frighten Linus, but there are still 5~6 weeks left before declaring the Linux 4.15.0 kernel as stable.

The importance of Devuan

Filed under
Debian

Yes, you read right: too expensive. While I am writing here in flowery words, the reason to use Devuan is hard calculated costs. We are a small team at ungleich and we simply don't have the time to fix problems caused by systemd on a daily basis. This is even without calculating the security risks that come with systemd. Our objective is to create a great, easy-to-use platform for VM hosting, not to walk a tightrope.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: OpenContrail, SDNs, ONAP

  • Juniper Flips OpenContrail To The Linux Foundation
    It’s a familiar story arc for open source efforts started by vendors or vendor-led industry consortiums. The initiatives are launched and expanded, but eventually they find their way into independent open source organizations such as the Linux Foundation, where vendor control is lessened, communities are able to grow, and similar projects can cross-pollinate in hopes of driving greater standardization in the industry and adoption within enterprises.
  • Juniper Hands OpenContrail SDN to Linux Found. Before It's Too Late
    After failing to develop a community around the project and receiving pushback from a major backer, Juniper may be saving Contrail from becoming irrelevant
  • CableLabs Announces Two Open Source Projects for NFV
    SNAPS is an overarching program at CableLabs to facilitate the adoption of software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) within the CableLabs’ community. The organization says it spearheaded SNAPS to fill in gaps within open source to ease the adoption of SDN and NFV for its cable members.
  • Bell becomes first operator to launch ONAP in production
    Canadian telecommunications company Bell announced it has become the first company to launch an open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in production. The announcement was noted by Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration at the Linux Foundation, in a company blog post. According to Joshipura, the news marks a first step toward using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s network as the company re-aligns itself to follow a multi-partner DevOps model.

OSS/Sharing Leftovers

  • Chrome 64 Beta: stronger pop-up blocker, Resize Observer, and import.meta
  • Chrome 64 Beta Brings Stronger Pop-Up Blocker, JavaScript Improvements
    Ahead of the holidays Google has pushed out the Chrome 64 beta to all supported platforms.
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Hadoop® v3.0.0 General Availability
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, today announced Apache® Hadoop® v3.0.0, the latest version of the Open Source software framework for reliable, scalable, distributed computing.
  • Open source science: Scientists researching rice plant genetics agree to not file for patents
    The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), a nonprofit established in the 2014 Farm Bill with bipartisan congressional support, awarded a $1 million Seeding Solutions grant to University of California, Davis (UC Davis) to study the genetics of rice plants. Together with researchers at the University of North Carolina and collaborators, the team will develop and implement a chemistry-driven gene discovery approach to identify genes that modulate root traits.
  • Lytro could open source their light-field photo sharing platform
  • Lytro considering open source light field photo sharing platform
    Lytro is reportedly considering an open source solution after announcing it would no longer support its sharing platform for Lytro cameras’ ‘living images.’
  • When Waze Won't Help, Palestinians Make Their Own Maps
    If you want to drive the 15 or so miles from Jerusalem to the city of Jericho, in the Palestinian Territories, Google Maps will tell you: “Can’t find a way there.” Waze will issue a warning: “Caution: This destination is in a high risk area or is prohibited to Israelis by law.” If you press “Confirm Drive” nonetheless, the app will direct you, just not all the way. When you pass from Israel into the West Bank, part of the occupied Palestinian Territories, Waze’s directions simply end. To keep going, you need to change your setting to allow access to “high risk” areas. Even then, GPS coverage tends to be limited.
  • Using Gmail with OAUTH2 in Linux and on an ESP8266
    One of the tasks I dread is configuring a web server to send email correctly via Gmail. The simplest way of sending emails is SMTP, and there are a number of scripts out there that provide a simple method to send mail that way with a minimum of configuration. There’s even PHP mail(), although it’s less than reliable.
  • Simplicity Before Generality, Use Before Reuse
    A common problem in component frameworks, class libraries, foundation services, and other infrastructure code is that many are designed to be general purpose without reference to concrete applications. This leads to a dizzying array of options and possibilities that are often unused or misused — or just not useful. Generally, developers work on specific systems; specifically, the quest for unbounded generality rarely serves them well (if at all). The best route to generality is through understanding known, specific examples, focusing on their essence to find an essential common solution. Simplicity through experience rather than generality through guesswork.
  • What Ruby Needs
    Of all of the questions we receive at RedMonk, one of the most common concerns programming languages. Whether from members of a given community or a commercial entity, the desire is to better understand a given language’s trajectory and the context around it. Is it going up or down, and what are the reasons for that direction? And, of course: can that direction be meaningfully changed? Recently, we’ve received several such inquiries around Ruby. For those with an interest in the language, then, the following is a quick public summary of the answers we’ve been providing privately.
  • HTML 5.2 is done, HTML 5.3 is coming
    Today W3C releases HTML 5.2. This is the second revision of HTML5, following last year’s HTML 5.1 Recommendation. In 2014 we expressed a goal to produce a revision roughly every year; HTML 5.2 is a continuation of that commitment. This Recommendation like its predecessor provides an updated stable guide to what is HTML. In the past year there has been a significant cleanup of the specification. We have introduced some new features, and removed things that are no longer part of the modern Web Platform, or that never achieved broad interoperability. As always we have also fixed bugs in the specification, making sure it adapts to the changing reality of the Web. Many of the features added integrate other work done in W3C. The Payment Request API promises to make commerce on the Web far easier, reducing the risks of making a mistake or being caught by an unscrupulous operator. New security features such as Content Security Policy protect users more effectively, while new work incorporated from ARIA helps developers offer people with disabilities a good user experience of their applications.

Games: SteamOS Birthday, Best Linux Games of 2017, Finding Paradise

  • It's Been Four Years Since SteamOS Began Shipping With Not Much To Show
    It was four years ago this week that Valve began shipping SteamOS, their Debian-based Linux distribution intended for Steam Machines and those wanting a gaming-oriented Linux distribution. While Valve still technically maintains the SteamOS Linux distribution, the outlook at this point is rather bleak. For our coverage from four years ago when Valve began shipping SteamOS 1.0 based on Debian Wheezy, see SteamOS Compositor Details, Kernel Patches, Screenshots, Former NVIDIA, Microsoft Developers Doing Lots Of The SteamOS Work, and The First NVIDIA GeForce Benchmarks On The SteamOS Beta.
  • 7 Best Linux Games of 2017
    We take a look at the best Linux games of 2017, ranging from AAA titles to introspective indie hits. So park your gamepad, pop your feet up, and raise a glass of something socially acceptable to what’s been another terrific year for Tux fans with twitchy thumbs!
  • Finding Paradise Available Now for PC, Mac, and Linux
    Canadian indie game studio Freebird Games has released Finding Paradise, a spiritual successor to the studio's hit game To the Moon. You can check out the game's release date trailers below, the first being slightly less of a "serious" trailer:

OSS: Blockchain, Avast, Predictions, GreenKey

  • Startup Aims to Build Open-Source Telecom Ecosystem on Blockchain
    There are 2,000+ mobile network operations in charge of providing communication services at global scale. However, the traditional infrastructure is centralized, inflexible and inaccurate. Common services like 3G/4G, Wi-Fi, BOSS mobile communications solutions and companies that use cloud-based communications solutions are often unable to render accurate content billing and distribution. Conventional mobile packages overcharge customers, not to mention that they pose concerns around data transmissions. An alternative solution to average mobile network providers could be Blockchain technology.
  • Merry Xmas, fellow code nerds: Avast open-sources decompiler
    Malware hunting biz and nautical jargon Avast has released its machine-code decompiler RetDec as open source, in the hope of arming like-minded haters of bad bytes and other technically inclined sorts with better analytical tools. As discussed as the recent Botconf 2017 in France earlier this month, RetDec provides a way to turn machine code – binary executables – back into an approximation of the original source code.
  • 10 open source predictions for 2018
    With 2017 just about done and dusted, dozens of open source experts have polished their crystal balls and made predictions about what can be expected in the open source space in 2018. Now it's our turn. (With fingers firmly crossed) here are 10 open source trends that you may – or may not – see coming to the fore next year. Some are obvious, some are frivolous, and some could just change your life.
  • Stop Calling Everything "Open Source": What "Open Source" Really Means
    "Open source" is an exciting concept in the world of software and beyond. But it shouldn't be applied to contexts where it makes no sense.
  • GreenKey to join Symphony; open source voice software
    GreenKey, creator of patented voice software with integrated speech recognition designed for the financial markets, today announced the firm has joined the Symphony Software Foundation, a nonprofit organization fostering innovation in financial services through open source software (OSS).
  • GreenKey Joins the Symphony Software Foundation; Will Open Source Voice Software
    GreenKey, creator of patented voice software with integrated speech recognition designed for the financial markets, today announced the firm has joined the Symphony Software Foundation, a nonprofit organization fostering innovation in financial services through open source software (OSS). GreenKey will release a Community Edition of its voice software development kit (SDK) that will enable banks and other financial market firms to "voice enable" any web application.