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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 2:43pm
Story KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 2:40pm
Story Graphics and Games: AMDGPU DC, Vulkan, GOG Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 2:37pm
Story Haiku OS Is Still Chugging Along To Get Its First Official Release Out Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 2:34pm
Story Microsoft Breaking the Law and Computer Security Woes Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 12:14pm
Story Mozilla 'Freemium' and Visual Impairment Simulator Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 12:11pm
Story Nokia and Apple Lost in Android Era Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 12:07pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 11:56am
Story 10 open source Linux robots from car-bots to humanoids Rianne Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 7:55am
Story How do you dump the firmware from a "secure" voting machine? With a $15 open source hardware board Roy Schestowitz 14/10/2017 - 5:31am

KDE/Qt: Cutelyst 1.9.0, Qt 5.10 Beta in KDE neon, Qt Creator 4.5 Beta

Filed under
KDE
  • Cutelyst 1.9.0 released!

    Cutelyst the Qt web framework got a new release. This is a rather small release but has some important fixes so I decided to roll sooner.

  • Qt 5.10 Beta available for testing with KDE neon

    Qt 5.10 Beta was released this week and the neon builder cloud elves have been compiling it away ready for testing.

    There’s no QtWebEngine or Qt3D so stuff which needs those will be broken.

  • Qt Creator 4.5 Beta released

    We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.5 Beta!

    There has been very little time between the 4.4 release and the 4.5 feature freeze, but 4.5 still comes with a bunch of very nice improvements.

    Locator now does fuzzy camel case matching in the same way as code completion does. Type “c andesu” in locator to open the “AndroidDebugSupport” class.

  • Qt Creator 4.5 Beta Arrives With Few Changes

    Just over one month since the release of Qt Creator 4.4, the 4.5 beta is now available as the latest feature testing release for this Qt/C++ focused integrated development environment.

GNOME/GTK: GNOME 3.28, GTK+ 3, GNOME Photos, GNOME.Asia 2017 and Fractional Scaling

Filed under
GNOME
  • GNOME 3.28 Expected To Ship On Pi Day

    The GNOME team has firmed up the release schedule for the in-development GNOME 3.28 desktop environment.

    GNOME 3.28.0 is expected to be released on 14 March 2018, which many in the tech/mathematics community celebrate each year as Pi day.

  • A scrolling primer

    A few years ago, I wrote a post about scrolling in GTK+ 3. Time for another look!

  • Stable GNOME Photos Flatpaks moved to Flathub
  • Going to GNOME.Asia 2017

    To be honest, I’m really exited about this trip. I’ve never been to ChongQing before.

  • How to Enable Fractional Scaling in Gnome

    Fractional scaling is practically necessary if you’re running a HiDPI display, and you want your desktop to scale uniformly to match your display. It’s always been an issue on Linux, but the latest version of the GNOME desktop has implemented a true fractional scaling feature to keep your desktop looking good.

    Even though GNOME 3.26 does have fractional scaling support, it wasn’t mature enough to make the release. As a result, it’s still a testing feature that you need to enable yourself.

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat

Devices: Steampunk, Axiomtek, Digi-Key, Nvidia, Tizen Studio

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • The Linux Steampunk Conference Badge

    I prototype, write, speak, and consult on physical computing gadgets and wanted a one-off attention-grabbing conference badge that would break the conversational ice when I walked around trade shows. That quest started a few years ago , with the first generation Arduino Pro-Mini and a 1.8” color TFT screen conference badge.

  • Networking appliance runs Linux on new quad- and octa-core Denverton CPUs

    Axiomtek’s “NA362” net appliance features Intel’s Atom C3538 and C3758 chips, and offers 6x GbE, 4x 10GbE SFP+, mini-PCIe, SATA, and up to 128GB DDR4 RAM.

    Axiomtek’s NA362 network appliance, which sits on the high end of our embedded coverage, gives you a choice of two new members of Intel’s Atom C3000 “Denverton” family: the quad-core C3538 and octa-core C3758. Earlier Linux-friendly Denverton products that we’ve covered were COM Express Basic Type 7 modules that tapped the original 16-core, 2.2GHz C3000. These include DFI’s DV970, Congatec’s Conga-B7AC, and Portwell’s PCOM-B701.

  • Digi-Key ready to ship the mangOH Red open source hardware platform

    Targeted at the industrial IoT and maker communities, mangOH Red is what Sierra Wireless claims to be the most feature-rich, lowest power open source enablement platform on the market.

  • Nvidia sets sights on the driverless revolution with Drive PX Pegasus

    On Tuesday, Nvidia announced a new version of its automotive-grade compute platforms, Drive PX Pegasus. It's recognition that the computational needs of fully autonomous (also known as level 5) vehicles are going to be demanding. Such vehicles will have to fuse inputs from multiple sensors and sensor-types, then make sense of it all with no fuss to get us from A to B. "The reality is we need more horsepower to get to level 5," said Danny Shapiro, Nvidia's senior director of automotive.

  • Tizen Studio gets updated to version 1.3 with Native UI builder and standalone RT IDE

OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • How an open team can assess threats and opportunities

    You may be familiar with the "SWOT" decision-making tool. It's a methodology for helping teams clearly outline a set of conditions, compare options, and make transparent decisions based on an idea's Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats ("SWOT"). SWOT is an efficient tool in my strategic planning toolkit.

  • Open-source in India: 3 of 4 coders come from product firms, Amazon leads
  • ONAP Collaborates with MEF on Open Source Efforts, Reaches ‘Tipping Point’ in Subscribers Participating

    Open source community leader ONAP is teaming up with standards body MEF to further harmonize open source efforts ahead of 5G.

    Arpit Joshipura, GM of Networking and Orchestration at the Linux Foundation, told Wireless Week the agreement will allow for “collaboration between open source and open standards.” 

    Both groups said they share the same objectives, including orchestrating services across multiple providers and multiple network technology domains and building a framework for real-time, policy-driven software automation of virtual and physical network functions.

  • Ford invests in Autonomic to make open-source mobility service platform
  • EuroBSDcon 2017: "travel notes" after the conference
  • Metsä Wood: From Desktop Designs to Actual Projects - Join Open Source Wood
  • Penn Libraries to End Partnership with bepress

    This fall, the Penn Libraries will begin exploring open source options for hosting Penn’s institutional repository, ScholarlyCommons, which provides free and open access to scholarly works created by Penn faculty, staff and students.

    For 13 years, Penn Libraries has hosted ScholarlyCommons on the platform Digital Commons, which we contract from the commercial company bepress. Through ScholarlyCommons and other initiatives, the Penn Libraries has enabled Penn authors to lower barriers to accessing scholarship, publish new research, and take advantage of library services that benefit not only our own community but those around the world. For 13 years, bepress was a partner in this endeavor.

    In August, bepress sold their company to Elsevier, a business with a history of aggressive confidentiality agreements, steep price increases, and opaque data mining practices. In their acquisition of bepress and other companies like SSRN and Mendeley, Elsevier demonstrates a move toward the consolidation and monopolization of products and services impacting all areas of the research lifecycle.

  • Equifax website hacked again, this time to redirect to fake Flash update

    In May credit reporting service Equifax's website was breached by attackers who eventually made off with Social Security numbers, names, and a dizzying amount of other details for some 145.5 million US consumers. For several hours on Wednesday the site was compromised again, this time to deliver fraudulent Adobe Flash updates, which when clicked, infected visitors' computers with adware that was detected by only three of 65 antivirus providers.

Programming: Distributed Software, RcppArmadillo, ConCom, HyperCard

Filed under
Development
  • Why Testing Is Important for Distributed Software

    As developers, we often hear that tests are important. Automated testing minimizes the number of bugs released to production, helps prevent regression, improves code quality, supplements documentation, and makes code reviews easier. In short, tests save businesses money by increasing system uptime and keeping developers working on new features instead of fighting fires. While software testing has been around for about as long as software has, I would argue that testing is especially important (and unfortunately more challenging) in modern distributed software systems.

  • RcppArmadillo 0.8.100.1.0
  • ConCom, and calls for programming, charity, and staff (oh my!)
  • HyperCard

    One of my favorite pastimes is imagining and planning to write new coding projects: researching technologies, checking out libraries I might use, making GUI mockups, downloading similar projects.

    I was thinking the other day that it might be fun to create a desktop-based editor that had an HTTP server embedded.  The HTTP server would serve up only one document, which is the document being currently edited, and it would show a live representation of the screen as being show the person editing the document.

    I was thinking it might be fun to re-implement the old HyperCard system.

Oracle and FOSS: Odd Couple

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle Announced Plans to Open Source All Features of Their JDK and Address Shortcomings in Java EE

    During the opening keynote at JavaOne this year, Oracle announced plans to release Java SE under GPL and to open-source all the features in Oracle’s JDK. The vendor also admitted that Java EE wasn’t fit for the new world of microservices and serverless, and talked about plans to address the issue. Case studies on modern microservices architectures were provided by Alibaba and Spotify. The full keynote video is available on YouTube, but below we’re providing a summary of the key information.

  • Q. Why's Oracle so two-faced over open source? A. Moolah, wonga, dosh

    Oracle loves open source. Except when the database giant hates open source. Which, according to its recent lobbying of the US federal government, seems to be "most of the time".

    Yes, Oracle has recently joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to up its support for open-source Kubernetes and, yes, it has long supported (and contributed to) Linux. And, yes, Oracle has even gone so far as to (finally) open up Java development by putting it under a foundation's stewardship.

    Yet this same, seemingly open Oracle has actively hammered the US government to consider that "there is no math that can justify open source from a cost perspective as the cost of support plus the opportunity cost of forgoing features, functions, automation and security overwhelm any presumed cost savings."

Games: Sudden Strike, Riskers, Monsters and Medicine and More

Filed under
Gaming

ExTiX 17.8 – “The Ultimate Linux System” – with LXQt 0.11.1, Refracta tools, Nvidia 384.90 and kernel 4.13.0-15-exton – Build 171012

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I have made a new version of ExTiX – The Ultimate Linux System. I call it ExTiX 17.8 LXQt Live DVD. (The previous version was 17.4 from 170418).

ABOUT
ExTiX 17.8 LXQt DVD 64 bit is based on Debian 9 Stretch and Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark, to be released 171019. The original system includes the Desktop Environment Gnome. After removing Gnome I have installed LXQt 0.11.1. LXQt is the Qt port and the upcoming version of LXDE, the Lightweight Desktop Environment. It is the product of the merge between the LXDE-Qt and the Razor-qt projects: A lightweight, modular, blazing-fast and user-friendly desktop environment.

The system language is ENGLISH.

Read more

5 benefits of contributing to open source projects

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OSS

Open source was once seen as a risky bet for the enterprise. If open source software was used at all it was by small companies, or by larger firms in stealthy pockets by IT and development professionals who saw the value of the model but couldn't "sell" it upstream.

To be fair, it was a different time with a different pace of business, and the open source model was a little too loose for most companies. Today? Open source is wearing figurative pinstripes while enabling companies of all sizes and industries to innovate at the pace of digital. And savvy companies are not only using it, but also contributing to open source projects to drive innovation, growth, and revenue.

Read more

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Pantheon Desktop Environment

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu

Pantheon is beautiful, lightweight, fast, simple and brings something new to Linux desktops. For Linux newbies, Pantheon is pretty straightforward and easy to use. For advanced users who prefer to tinker with their desktop, Pantheon is a no go as there is little to do in terms of customizations. Changing wallpapers and switching workspace could surely do with some simplification Nonetheless, I believe everyone who used Pantheon is going to be impressed with how beautiful this desktop environment is.

​The Pantheon desktop is definitely among the very best desktop environments. Currently, there are efforts to bring the Pantheon desktop to some major distributions such as Fedora and Arch. There is even a community version of Manjaro that comes with Pantheon. But if you really want to use this desktop go with elementary OS.

Read more

GNU/Linux Works, Microsoft Windows Stops Working

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Why Linux Works

    The Linux community works, it turns out, because the Linux community isn’t too concerned about work, per se. As much as Linux has come to dominate many areas of corporate computing – from HPC to mobile to cloud – the engineers who write the Linux kernel tend to focus on the code itself, rather than their corporate interests therein.

  • Windows 10 mandatory October KB4041676 update is causing machines to BSOD

    Today when people started waking up from their machines automatically updating during the night, however, they have been faced with a BSOD (Blue Screen of Death) instead of the Windows 10 desktop, and unfortunately, no-one seems to know why the installations are failing, only that it relates to KB4041676, which is yesterday's update.

  • Global shipments of PCs slump for 12th successive quarter, research suggests [iophk: "PCs no longer have any Windows or Microsoft stickers, hiding the infection"]

    An assessment by research and analysis outfit Gartner found that shipments totalled 67 million units in the third quarter of 2017; a decline of 3.6% on an annualised basis compared to the same quarter last year.

    The latest decline marked the 12th consecutive quarter of PC shipments slump.

  • The PC still isn't dead and the market is 'stabilising', says IDC

    In its Worldwide Quarterly Personal Computing Device Tracker, IDC announced worldwide shipments of traditional PCs, which includes desktops, notebooks, workstations, totalled 67.2 million units in the third quarter of 2017.

    While this translates into a slight year-over-year decline of 0.5 percent, IDC said [...]

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, T-Mobile, ATMs, Microsoft Outlook "Fake Crypto" and Accenture

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #128
  • T-Mobile customer data plundered thanks to bad API

    A bug disclosed and patched last week by T-Mobile in a Web application interface allowed anyone to query account information by simply providing a phone number. That includes customer e-mail addresses, device identification data, and even the answers to account security questions. The bug, which was patched after T-Mobile was contacted by Motherboard's Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai on behalf of an anonymous security researcher, was apparently also exploited by others, giving them access to information that could be used to hijack customers' accounts and move them to new phones. Attackers could potentially gain access to other accounts protected by SMS-based "two factor" authentication simply by acquiring a T-Mobile SIM card.

  • Criminals stole millions from E. Europe banks with ATM “overdraft” hack

    Banks in several former Soviet states were hit with a wave of debit card fraud earlier this year that netted millions of dollars worth of cash. These bank heists relied on a combination of fraudulent bank accounts and hacking to turn nearly empty bank accounts into cash-generating machines. In a report being released by TrustWave's SpiderLabs today, SpiderLabs researchers detailed the crime spree: hackers gained access to bank systems and manipulated the overdraft protection on accounts set up by proxies and then used automated teller machines in other countries to withdraw thousands of dollars via empty or nearly empty accounts.

    While SpiderLabs' investigation accounted for about $40 million in fraudulent withdrawals, the report's authors noted, "when taking into account the undiscovered or uninvestigated attacks along with investigations undertaken by internal groups or third parties, we estimate losses to be in the hundreds of millions in USD." This criminal enterprise was a hybrid of traditional credit fraud and hacking. It relied on an army of individuals with fake identity documents, as these folks were paid to set up accounts at the targeted institutions with the lowest possible deposit. From there, individuals requested debit cards for the accounts, which were forwarded to co-conspirators in other countries throughout Europe and in Russia.

  • Buggy Microsoft Outlook Sending Encrypted S/MIME Emails With Plaintext Copy For Months

    Beware, If you are using S/MIME protocol over Microsoft Outlook to encrypt your email communication, you need to watch out.

    From at least last 6 months, your messages were being sent in both encrypted and unencrypted forms, exposing all your secret and sensitive communications to potential eavesdroppers.

    S/MIME, or Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions, is an end-to-end encryption protocol—based on public-key cryptography and works just like SSL connections—that enables users to send digitally signed and encrypted messages.

  • Fake Crypto: Microsoft Outlook S/MIME Cleartext Disclosure (CVE-2017-11776)

    Outlook version XXX (we are still waiting for Microsoft to release detailed information and update the blog accordingly) was the first affected version. So any S/MIME encrypted mail written since that date might be affected.

    Unfortunately there is no easy solution to remediate the impact of this vulnerability (we are still waiting for Microsoft to release detailed information and update the blog).

    In cases where mails have been send to third parties (recipient is outside of the sender’s organization) remediation is not possible by the sending party, since the sender has no authority over the recipient’s mail infrastructure.

  • Accenture data leak: 'Keys to the kingdom' left exposed via multiple unsecured cloud servers

    A massive trove of sensitive corporate and customer data was left freely exposed to the public by Accenture, one of the world's biggest management firms. The tech giant left at least four cloud storage servers, which contained highly sensitive decryption keys and passwords, exposed to the public, without any password protections.

Ubuntu: elementaryOS Snaps, Kernel, MAAS, and Ubuntu Server

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • elementary on why snaps are right for their Linux distro

    elementary is the company behind the elementary OS Linux distribution and the associated app store. Celebrating their tenth anniversary this year, elementary began in 2007 with their first release in 2011. They are currently on their 4th release (Loki) and are working towards their 5th (Juno) with Jupiter, Luna and Freya as previous releases. At the Ubuntu Rally in New York, we spoke to elementary’s founder Daniel Fore and Systems Architect, Cody Garver, to discover what made snaps the right Linux application packaging format for their distro.

  • Kernel Team Summary- October 11, 2017
  • MAAS 2.3.0 beta 2 released!
  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 10 Oct 2017

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Alpha outs Centurion Nano/Ultra Linux laptops

    If you’re looking for a slim notebook and acknowledge the superiority of Linux over Windows, you could be interested in the two new Alpha laptops that come pre-installed with a Linux-based OS. The Centurion Nano and Centurion Ultra notebooks are powered by gen 7 ULV CPUs from Intel and feature stylish slim silver aluminum cases.

  • Ditching Windows for Linux led to 'major difficulties' says open-source champion Munich [Ed: This is FUD. Munich is not replacing GNU/Linux. At least not yet. Microsoft needs Munich to fail or be perceived as failing by all means possible. This is why.]
  • Administering Chromebooks : For teams traveling to complex and hostile environments

    If you are traveling to hostile or complex environments the phrase “use a Chromebook” has become the “use Signal, use Tor” of border crossing device security. Nearly all of the individuals who work in these environments knows that, as with everything, it’s more complex than that.

  • Red Hat channel head talking to partner base about the wider opportunity

    The recently appointed UK channel head at Red Hat is keen to talk to existing partners about the benefits of selling the firm's wider portfolio

  • Red Hat unveils new containerised storage solution

    Open source solutions provider Red Hat has unveiled its new Container-Native Storage solution, which now supports containerised applications and infrastructure in Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform clusters.

    The company says providing a platform for versatile storage for containers will enable customers to manage, scale, and upgrade their storage needs using a single control plane, allowing for greater storage efficiency and cost savings.

  • Bodhi 2.12.1 released
  • Announce: Entangle “Lithium“ release 1.0 – an app for tethered camera control & capture
  • Mir 1.0 Is Pulled Back, Now It's Mir 0.28

    While we've long been told that Mir 1.0 would happen for Ubuntu 17.10 -- even as recently as last month -- and then earlier this week was a Mir 1.0 tag and the v1.0.0 milestone in Launchpad, that version is being pulled back in favor of calling it Mir 0.28.

    Even following the decision to drop the grand Unity 8 + Mir plans, Mir 1.0 was still a target for the "Artful Aardvark" and their revised plan around the remaining Mir developers has been adding Wayland client support. That initial Wayland client support in Mir is in place albeit still fairly basic but should get better over time. We haven't seen Mir Vulkan support or other previously talked about changes for Mir 1.0, including the dropping of their old APIs, etc.

  • Arch Vs. Linux Mint

    If there’s ever been a mismatch in comparing any two distros, it definitely does not get any better as a mismatch than this. While Linux Mint seeks to provide an all-around distro that is ready for work and play right out of the box with a carefully curated software selection and experience, Arch allows advanced users to custom design their own distro with only the packages and software they’d want. So how do these two distros compare, their similarities and differences?​

Software, KDE, and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • D-Bus Broker Updated To Version 5

    Earlier this year was word of BUS1 working on a D-Bus Broker while announced in late August was this D-Bus Broker project as a high performance message bus.

  • 10 Free Linux Productivity Apps You Haven’t Heard Of

    Productivity apps can really make your work easier. If you are a Linux user, these 10 lesser-known free productivity apps for the Linux desktop can help you.. As a matter of fact, it’s possible keen Linux users have heard of all the apps on the list, but for somebody who hasn’t gone beyond the main apps, these should be unknown.

  • Krita 3.3.1
  • KDE Plasma 5.12 Pushing For "An Awesome Release On Wayland"

    While today's release of KDE Plasma 5.11 brings with it many Wayland improvements, KWin maintainer Martin Flöser (né Gräßlin) is proposing to get the Plasma 5.12 support into better shape on Wayland.

  • GNOME Foundation hackfest in Berlin

    Last weekend we held a GNOME Foundation hackfest in Berlin, as planned in August. That means not just a hackfest organised by the foundation, but to improve the foundation itself. Many of the topics we had to cover are interconnected and it’s a challenge to untangle it all and sort it out. Being in the same room, with a projector and a whiteboard, helped a lot. Many thanks to Kinvolk who let us use their

Linux Foundation, Kernel, and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • A ZSTD-Compressed Linux Kernel Could Be Up Next

    Nick Terrell of Facebook is proposing support for ZSTD-compressed kernel and ramdisk images. This would add to the list of other algorithms already available like Gzip, XZ, LZ4, and others for dealing with kernel images at boot time.

  • Chasing Grace: A New Documentary Series about Women in Tech

    After hearing several women in tech, smart women with bright futures, talk about leaving their jobs, Jennifer Cloer, Founder/Lead Consultant, reTHINKit PR, decided to launch the “Chasing Grace Project,” a six-episode documentary series about women in tech. The trailer debuted at the recent Linux Foundation Diversity Empowerment Summit in LA.

    “A young, very talented female programmer recently told me: ‘I don’t want to leave tech but after a year into my first job, I’m considering it,’” said Cloer. So she asked herself, “What can I do to help”

  • OVR_multiview Extension Completed For More Efficient OpenGL VR

    The OVR_multiview OpenGL Extension developed via the OpenVR initiative has been around for several months in an incomplete form for allowing more efficient virtual reality (VR) rendering while now the extension is complete.

  • More Than 100 More AMDGPU DC Patches Line Up Ahead Of Linux 4.15

    AMDGPU DC is expected for Linux 4.15 assuming Linus Torvalds has no objections to merging the code. We hope it won't, but the code-base for this new AMD display code is outright massive at more than 120,000 lines of code over hundreds of patches. Today another 103 new patches were published.

  • Initial Gallium3D VC5 Driver Merged Into Mesa

    The initial "VC5" Gallium3D driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics hardware has been merged into mainline Mesa.

  • Linux 4.15 Will Finally Graduate Intel "Coffee Lake" Graphics Out Of Alpha Support

    Another set of Intel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver updates were mailed in to DRM-Next today for the eventual Linux 4.15 kernel cycle.

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