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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Security: Cleartext Passwords, Windows Problems, and Meltdown Patches/Performance

Filed under
Security
  • cleartext passwords and transparency

    So let me just jump in with Lars blog post where he talks about cleartext passwords. While he has actually surmised and shared what a security problem they are, the pity is we come to know of this only because the people in question tacitly admitted to bad practises. How many more such bad actors are there, developers putting user credentials in cleartext god only knows. There was even an April Fool’s joke in 2014 which shared why putting passwords in cleartext is bad.

  • 911 operator suspended over teen’s death griped about working overtime.

    Plush called 911 again around 3:35 p.m., this time giving Smith a description of the vehicle, a gold Honda Odyssey in the parking lot at Seven Hills — information that never made it to the officers at the scene.

    “This is not a joke,” the teen told Smith. “I’m almost dead.”

    Smith tried to document the call when it came in but her computer screen had frozen, preventing her from entering information immediately, the review found.

  • Defense contractors face more aggressive ransomware attacks

    The rise of ransomware attacks against defense contractors coincides with a rise in the use of ransomware in general. Attacks can spread even after the original target has been hit, hurting unintended victims.

  • A Look At The Meltdown Performance Impact With DragonFlyBSD 5.2

    Besides looking at the HAMMER2 performance in DragonFlyBSD 5.2, another prominent change with this new BSD operating system release is the Spectre and Meltdown mitigations being shipped. In this article are some tests looking at the performance cost of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 for mitigating the Meltdown Intel CPU vulnerability.

    With DragonFlyBSD 5.2 there is the machdep.meltdown_mitigation sysctl for checking on the Meltdown mitigation presence and toggling it. Back in January we ran some tests of DragonFlyBSD's Meltdown mitigation using the page table isolation approach while now testing was done using the DragonFlyBSD 5.2 stable release.

  • A Last Minute Linux 4.17 Pull To Help Non-PCID Systems With KPTI Meltdown Performance

    While the Linux 4.17 kernel merge window is closing today and is already carrying a lot of interesting changes as covered by our Linux 4.17 feature overview, Thomas Gleixner today sent in a final round of x86 (K)PTI updates for Meltdown mitigation with this upcoming kernel release.

    This latest round of page-table isolation updates should help out systems lacking PCID, Process Context Identifiers. The KPTI code makes use of PCID for reducing the performance overhead of this Meltdown mitigation technique. PCID has been around since the Intel Westmere days, but now the latest kernel patches will help offset the KPTI performance impact for systems lacking PCID.

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
BSD

Wine Development: Wine-Staging 3.6, DXVK, and API Copyrights

Filed under
Software
  • Wine-Staging 3.6 Released, Carrying ~930 Patches, Fixes For CSMT Toggling & Dead Rising

    Based off Friday's release of Wine 3.6 is now a new Wine-Staging release that is carrying about 930 patches atop the upstream Wine code-base.

  • DXVK 0.42 Brings DXGI Gamma Control, HLSL Bits For Tessellation/Geometry Shaders

    DXVK 0.42 is now available as the open-source project implementing the Direct3D 11 API over Vulkan for the benefit of Wine-based gamers.

    The DXVK 0.42 release adds support for DXGI Gamma Control functions in order to handle any gamma settings in different games. There's also a change to avoid compiling the same DXBC shader multiple times, thereby conserving CPU resources.

  • The Oracle vs. Google Case Is Concerning Some Wine Developers

    At the end of March the US Federal Court of Appeals made a reversal in the long-running Oracle vs. Google battle over the use of Java APIs within Android. The appeals court determined that Google's use of some Java APIs were not under fair-use, which could set a dangerous precedent for some open-source projects.

    For those not familiar with the recent ruling in the Oracle vs. Google case on appeal, there is a brief summary available on Wikipedia for those interested.

KDE: KDE Plasma 5.13, Modern KDE Applications on FreeBSD and More

Filed under
KDE
  • KDE Plasma 5.13 Is Getting Further Polished Ahead Of Its June Release

    KDE Plasma 5.13 will be starting up even faster, focusing more on Wayland improvements, improved monitor hot-plugging, GTK global menu support, and a lot of polishing throughout.

  • Modern KDE Applications on FreeBSD

    After the shoving is done — and it is, for the most part — it is time to fill up the void left behind by the KDE4 ports that have been shoved aside. In other words, all over the place has been shoved aside to -kde4, and now it’s time to reintroduce , but in the modern KDE Applications form. For instance, there is now a science/kalzium-kde4 (the old stuff) and a science/kalzium (the new stuff). It’s not 100% complete, but most of the applications are there.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 14

    Time for your weekly dose of Usability & Productivity! We’ve got some good stuff today, including some nice improvements for the Open & Save dialogs–with a lot more on that front to come soon!

    Additionally, another major bug worth highlighting has been fixed! Previously, image slideshows used for the desktop wallpaper or in a media frame widget would leak memory like crazy, eventually crashing the system. Veteran KDE developer David Edmundson traced this to a Qt bug and submitted a patch that’s been accepted! It’ll go into Qt 5.11 which hasn’t been released yet, so go bug your distros to backport the fix into their Qt 5.9.x or 5.10.x branches, as we plan to do for the upcoming Kubuntu 18.04 release. Soon KDE Plasma users will once again be able to use slideshow wallpapers without blowing up their computers!

  • Plasma Vault with KDE Connect, and more

    There have been a few smaller improvements to the Plasma Vault pushed to master in the past few days, scheduled for release in Plasma 5.13.

More on GNOME 3.28.1

Filed under
GNOME
  • First GNOME 3.28 Point Release Is Now Rolling Out

    Developers have issued the first point release to GNOME 3.28, which was released last month.

    GNOME 3.28.1 brings a boat load of bug fixes for a stack of GNOME desktop components, modules and apps.

    And, because I know you’ll want ask, the answer is no: a fix for the big GNOME memory leak issue is not part of this update (though work is taking place to address it, so don’t panic).

  • GNOME 3.28.1 released

    Here comes our first update to GNOME 3.28, with many bug fixes,
    improvements, documentation and translation updates.

Ubuntu Spotted in ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you plan on renting a copy of Maze Runner: The Death Cure when it hits home media later this month, you may spot something familiar that’ll have you spitting your popcorn out.

An eagle-eyed Reddit user spotted Ubuntu, complete with the Unity desktop, being used in the latest instalment of the Maze Runner film franchise.

I have not seen any of the Maze Runner films (or read the books, but I can’t imagine Ubuntu is specified in them) so I’ve zero idea about the context for Ubuntu’s appearance in ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure‘.

But based on the well-worn Hollywood tropes we can see in this screenshot, i.e the green-tinged screen and various command line prompts, I’m guessing some sort of “hacking” is taking place.

Admittedly we’re not talking high-level, elite hack0rz here though as if you look at the output of GNOME terminal closely you’ll see the user has just run sudo apt upgrade.

Read more

Programming: Subversion 1.10 and INN 2.6.2

Filed under
Development
  • Apache Subversion 1.10 Release Notes

    Apache Subversion 1.10 is a superset of all previous Subversion releases, and is as of the time of its release considered the current "best" release. Any feature or bugfix in 1.0.x through 1.9.x is also in 1.10, but 1.10 contains features and bugfixes not present in any earlier release. The new features will eventually be documented in a 1.10 version of the free Subversion book (svnbook.red-bean.com).

  • Subversion 1.10 Released With LZ4 Compression, New Conflict Resolver

    For those still using Subversion for revision control system for cases like managing of large files or dealing with legacy code-bases, the Apache Subversion 1.10 release is now available.

    There is quite a bit of new work in Subversion 1.10 compared to previous versions of this VCS. Highlights include improved path-based authorization with better performance and wildcard support, a new interactive conflict resolver, LZ4 compression support, new client command-line options, and experimental shelving support.

  • INN 2.6.2

    In the feature department, this release adds a new syntaxchecks parameter to inn.conf that can be used to disable message ID syntax checking, better header sanitization support in mailpost, support for TLS 1.3, and support for using GnuPG v1 (which is unfortunately important for control messages and NoCeM on Usenet still).

A Look At The HAMMER2 File-System Performance With DragonFlyBSD 5.2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

With this week's release of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 this popular BSD operating system is promoting its own HAMMER2 file-system as stable. As a result, here are a few fresh benchmarks of HAMMER vs. HAMMER2 on DragonFlyBSD 5.2 while more tests are forthcoming.

HAMMER2 received many improvements during the DragonFlyBSD 5.2 development cycle to the point where they now recommend HAMMER2 as the default root file-system for non-clustered systems; the clustered mode for HAMMER2 is yet to be implemented.

On Phoronix we have been covering the HAMMER2 file-system since its inception back in 2012 and have been benchmarking it more recently since it became a fairly viable choice in DragonFlyBSD 5.0. HAMMER2 is a clean sheet design and supports online deduplication, snapshots, LZ4/Zlib compression, encryption, and other features. Our tests have been positive and in the testing of DragonFlyBSD 5.0 and 5.2 we have yet to lose any data to this file-system led by DragonFly lead developer Matthew Dillon.

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LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.5 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.5 is now available with updates to Raspberry Pi firmware to address issues seen with the initial firmware release supporting the new 3B+ hardware (which also affected the Slice box). We also bump both nVidia drivers in the Generic x86_64 image, resolve an MCE remote problem, add support for the WeTek Pro remote control unit in WeTek images, the Allo DigiOne DAC in Raspberry Pi images, and updated u-boot in the Odroid C2 image now supports mild overclocking to boost performance.

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Games: BATTLETECH, Rust, Rocket League, Wine

Filed under
Gaming

Download YouTube Videos in Linux Command Line

Filed under
Software

Easily download YouTube videos in Linux using youtube-dl command line tool. With this tool, you can also choose video format and choose video quality to download it in 1080p or 720p or 4K.
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The Lightweight Xubuntu 18.04 Beta 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

Xubuntu 18.04 beta 2 is already lightweight yet still feature-rich. It gives us same experience with the old Xubuntu but with latest version of applications. And please note, it still support both 64 bit and 32 bit! We can consider the next final stable release to be as lightweight as this beta 2 version. Finally, Xubuntu Bionic is really amusing. We will wait!

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Release of Linux 4.9.94, 4.4.128, and 3.18.105; Linux 4.17-rc1 Coming Soon

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver and Pop!_OS 18.04 Previews

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver: What’s new?

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will be released on April 26. It is Canonical’s seventh Long Term Support release, and it comes with several changes for the Ubuntu community. These include a slightly, darkish theme and X.Org Server as default display server instead of Wayland, which is used in the current stable release, Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark. Ubuntu 18.04 is still in beta and is not recommended for use on production systems or on your primary computers just yet.

  • Pop!_Testing

    It is through your feedback and contributions that Pop!_OS can become the productivity platform for innovators, developers, makers, and computer scientists.

  • System76 Rolls Out Pop!_OS 18.04 For Testing

    Linux PC vendor System76 has released their second test spin of the upcoming Pop!_OS 18.04, which is also derived from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS but with a growing set of changes.

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.45.0

Filed under
KDE

KDE today announces the release of KDE Frameworks 5.45.0.

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement.

This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner.

Read more

Also: KDE Frameworks 5.45 Released With Remote Access Interface For KWayland

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MEF launches SDN certification and specs for Presto APIs

    MEF worked with The Linux Foundation and ETSI to develop an NFV and SDN certification to focus on related knowledge and skills. Meantime, MEF published specs for its Presto APIs.

  • Brainstorm – A Note-Taking App with Syntax Highlighting

    Brainstorm is an open source note-taking application with a modern clutter-free UI, live preview, syntax highlighting for all languages supported by highlight.js, and GitHub Flavored Markdown.

    You can use it to make notes, make plans, and create cheat sheets which you can share with your friends and categorize using tags.

    You can further organize your tagged notes into smartly named boards. You can also decide to run host your app data locally (using extra time,) or on a server.

  • Manjaro + Microsoft Office Online - Yup, come over

    I can hear the trumpets of cynicism already blaring loudly. But to deny the reality is to deprive oneself of actual value and advantages that modern technologies can offer. There's no place for ideology in that space, I'm afraid. Ideologies are reserved to true believers and the truly rich, and most people aren't in either group. Microsoft Office makes perfect sense, and having access to this software on Linux is a very good thing. The native integration places Manjaro in a league of its own.

    Of course, I would love to see this project grow and propagate and become "the thing" across all distributions, rather than a point of contention, rivalry and ego-forking for a dozen similar projects. Then, because I always think strategically, long term and end to end, I want to see the integration taken to the pro level. Cloud storage, account sync and backup, and more. Well, this is superb, I like it, I see the potential, and hopefully, the community will embrace the project. It is upon efforts like this that the distinction between obscurity and greatness lies. In the land of Mordor, where the geeks code. Take care.

  • Battle Royale game 'Darwin Project' looks like it might actually be coming to Linux

    Begin warming up the hype machine, as it looks like Battle Royale game 'Darwin Project' [Steam] might be getting a Linux version.

  • Hedge fund Elliott Management wants Micro Focus, which bought HPE Software and SUSE Linux, to go private

    Hedge fund Elliott Management is pushing UK software company Micro Focus, which merged with Hewlett Packard Enterprise's software business last year, to sell to a private equity firm, according to people familiar with the matter.

    Elliott has taken a stake in Micro Focus, said the people, who asked not to be named because the transaction is private. The stake is not quite five percent, which is the automatic disclosure threshold, said the people.

    Micro Focus has already received inbound interest from several private equity companies, said the people.

  • Epiq Solutions unveils highly integrated RF + Linux module to simplify wireless product development cycle

KDE: Elisa Music Player and GUI for kdesrc-build

Filed under
KDE
  • Elisa Music Player Makes Its Debut Release

    If you’re on the hunt for a modern looking music app on Linux look no further than Elisa.

    Perfect for those of you running Kubuntu or KDE Neon, the Qt-based Elisa music player is a modern, fresh looking app that aims to be “simple to use”.

  • Elisa Music Player Debuts, Zenroom Crypto-Language VM Reaches Version 0.5.0 and More

    The Elisa music player, developed by the KDE community, debuted yesterday, with version 0.1. Elisa has good integration wtih the Plasma desktop and also supports other Linux desktop environments, as well as Windows and Android. In addition, the Elisa release announcement notes, "We are creating a reliable product that is a joy to use and respects our users' privacy. As such, we will prefer to support online services where users are in control of their data."

  • Fancy status updating in kdesrc-build

    A few weeks back, a fellow KDE developer asked me in the IRC development channel whether I had thought about adding a GUI for kdesrc-build, to supplement (or even replace) the existing text-based interface.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?