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Tuesday, 14 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Latest ClearFog SBC offers four GbE ports and a 10GbE SFP+ port

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

SolidRun’s “ClearFog GT 8K” networking SBC runs Ubuntu on a network virtualization enabled quad -A72 Armada A8040 SoC and offers up to 16GB DDR4, 4x GbE ports, a WAN port, a 10GbE SFP+ port, and 3x mini-PCIe slots.

SolidRun has updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router SBCs with a ClearFog GT 8K model designed for high-end edge computing, virtual customer premise equipment (vCPE), network functional virtualization (NFV), network security, and general networking duty. The SBC runs Linux Kernel 4.4x, Ubuntu 16.04, and Google IoT Core on Marvell’s quad-core, up to 2GHz Cortex-A72 Armada A8040 SoC. Models are available with 8GB eMMC ($209), 128GB eMMC ($304), 8GB eMMC with 16GB RAM ($526), and 128GB eMMC with 16GB RAM ($621).

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Games and Wine

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Gaming

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • People Think Their Passwords Are Too Awesome For Two Factor Authentication. They’re Wrong.
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Let's Encrypt Now Trusted by All Major Root Programs

    Now, the CA’s root is directly trusted by almost all newer versions of operating systems, browsers, and devices. Many older versions, however, still do not directly trust Let’s Encrypt.

    While some of these are expected to be updated to trust the CA, others won’t, and it might take at least five more years until most of them cycle out of the Web ecosystem. Until that happens, Let’s Encrypt will continue to use a cross signature.

  • WPA2 flaw lets attackers easily crack WiFi passwords

    The security flaw was found, accidentally, by security researcher Jens Steube while conducting tests on the forthcoming WPA3 security protocol; in particular, on differences between WPA2's Pre-Shared Key exchange process and WPA3's Simultaneous Authentication of Equals, which will replace it. WPA3 will be much harder to attack because of this innovation, he added.

  • ​Linux kernel network TCP bug fixed

    Another day, another bit of security hysteria. This time around the usually reliable Carnegie Mellon University's CERT/CC, claimed the Linux kernel's TCP network stack could be "forced to make very expensive calls to tcp_collapse_ofo_queue() and tcp_prune_ofo_queue() for every incoming packet which can lead to a denial of service (DoS)."

  • State of Security for Open Source Web Applications 2018

    ach year, we publish a set of statistics summarizing the vulnerabilities we find in open source web applications. Our tests form part of Netsparker's quality assurance practices, during which we scan thousands of web applications and websites. This helps us to add to our security checks and continuously improve the scanner's accuracy.

    This blog post includes statistics based on security research conducted throughout 2017. But first, we take a look at why we care about open source applications, and the damage that can be caused for enterprises when they go wrong.

  • New Actor DarkHydrus Targets Middle East with Open-Source Phishing [Ed: Headline says "Open-Source Phishing," but this is actually about Microsoft Windows and Office (proprietary and full of serious bugs)]

    Government entities and educational institutions in the Middle East are under attack in an ongoing credential-harvesting campaign.

    Government entities and educational institutions in the Middle East are under attack in an ongoing credential-harvesting campaign, mounted by a newly-named threat group known as DarkHydrus. In a twist on the norm, the group is leveraging the open-source Phishery tool to carry out its dark work.

    The attacks follow a well-worn pattern, according to Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 group: Spear-phishing emails with attached malicious Microsoft Office documents are leveraging the “attachedTemplate” technique to load a template from a remote server.

KDE: Astronomy on KDE, MQTT/GSoC, Konversation Tip

Filed under
KDE
  • Astronomy on KDE

    I recently switched to KDE and Plasma as my main desktop environment, so I thought I'd start digging into some of the scientific software available on KDE. First up is KStars, the desktop astronomy program.

  • LabPlot's MQTT in the finish line

    Hello everyone. GSoC is coming to its end, so I think that I should give a report about what's been done since the last post, and also make a brief evaluation, summary of the project itself.

    As I've written in my last post, the main focus was on improving the quality of the code, cleaning, optimizing and properly documenting it. And also making it more comestible for other developers.

    The next step was searching for bugs and then fixing them. In order to do this properly, I implemented a unit test for the main MQTT related features. This proved to be useful since it helped discover several hidden bugs and errors which were all corrected. The main features, that tests were developed for, are: checking if a topic contains another one, checking if two topics are "common topics" (meaning they only differ at only one level, and are the same size), managing messages, subscribing&unsubscribing.

  • PSA: Use SASL in konversation

    You probably have seen that Freenode has been getting lots of spam lately.

    To protect against that some channels have activated a flag that only allows authenticated users to enter the channel.

    If you're using the regular "nickserv" authentication way as I was doing, the authentication happens in parallel to entering the channels and you'll probably be rejected from joining some.

Julia 1.0

Filed under
Development

The much anticipated 1.0 release of Julia is the culmination of nearly a decade of work to build a language for greedy programmers. JuliaCon2018 celebrated the event with a reception where the community officially set the version to 1.0.0 together.

[...]

Try Julia by downloading version 1.0 now. If you’re upgrading code from Julia 0.6 or earlier, we encourage you to first use the transitional 0.7 release, which includes deprecation warnings to help guide you through the upgrade process. Once your code is warning-free, you can change to 1.0 without any functional changes. The registered packages are in the midst of taking advantage of this stepping stone and releasing 1.0-compatible updates.

The single most significant new feature in Julia 1.0, of course, is a commitment to language API stability: code you write for Julia 1.0 will continue to work in Julia 1.1, 1.2, etc. The language is “fully baked.” The core language devs and community alike can focus on packages, tools, and new features built upon this solid foundation.

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Also: Julia 1.0 Released, 2018 State of Rust Survey, Samsung Galaxy Note 9 Launches Today, Margaret Dawson of Red Hat Named Business Role Model of the Year in Women in IT Awards and Creative Commons Awarded $800,000 from Arcadia

GNOME’s Ace Retro Gaming App Just Keeps Getting Better

Filed under
GNOME
Gaming

Forget Super Smash Bros Ultimate; the best gaming related revelations this week concern the epic GNOME Games app.

The next version of this handy arcade front will let you navigate the GUI using your gamepad, browse and play MSX and Nintendo Virtual Boy games, and load your ROM library faster than a Sonic game can scream ‘SEAAAGAAA!’.

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Educational Linux distribution Edubuntu has been (just about) discontinued

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Ubuntu

A few years ago the developers of Edubuntu that the Ubuntu-based operating system for teachers and students was going to skip the update to Ubuntu 16.04 and stay on Ubuntu 14.04 indefinitely. The two lead developers came to that decision after realizing that after a decade of working on the project, they didn’t have time to devote to keeping the operating system up to date.

As an open source project, the developers were hoping that someone else might be willing to step up and take over leadership of the project, but that hasn’t happened.

You can still download and use Edubuntu 14.04.5 today, but it’s based on a 4-year-old version of Ubuntu. And when Canonical pulls the plug on support for Ubuntu 14.04 in April, 2019 then the latest version of Edubuntu will also be unsupported.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Ring-KDE 3.0.0 has been released

Filed under
KDE

It has been some time. I come back from the shadows to announce the release of Ring-KDE 3.0.0, A GNU Ring.cx client. GNU Ring is a secure and distributed communication platform based on open standards. It weaves industry standard technologies to work together and provides audio calls, video conferences, chat, screen sharing and peer to peer file transfer between you and your friends. Additionally, its use of open standards allows to bridge to various other systems like the main phone network or SIP compatible devices.

When joining the GNU Ring, no servers or centralized accounts are needed. Beside an optional blockchain-based way to reserve your username against takeover, nothing leaves your device. All your data is kept under your control. Ring-KDE provides a simple wizard to help you create credentials or import your personal information from other devices.

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Also: Ring-KDE 3.0 Released To Use The GNU's Distributed Communication Platform

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Operating System Support Extended Until June 30, 2019

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SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, the OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 operating system is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 and the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. Like previous openSUSE Leap 42 point releases, openSUSE Leap 42.3 was supposed to receive 18 months of support, until January 2019.

However, both the openSUSE Project and parent company SUSE decided to give users more time to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 release, which is based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 15 operating system series, by continuing to deliver updates to the openSUSE Leap 42.3 release, and the openSUSE Leap 42 series, for six more months.

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GNOME 3.30 Desktop Will Finally Bring Automatic Updates, but Only for Flatpaks

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GNOME

One of the coolest, long-anticipated feature coming to the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment this fall is automatic updates. Yes, you're reading it right, the GNOME Project is enabling automatic software updates for you so you won't have to worry about if you're running the latest version of a software or not, but only for Flatpaks at this time.

According to Richard Hughes, the new automatic updates feature has been implemented in the GNOME Software package manager and will be available as part of the GNOME 3.30 release this fall, enabled by default only for Flatpak apps, the universal binary format for Linux-based operating systems, along with an option in preferences to disable it.

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Stable kernels 4.17.14, 4.14.62, 4.9.119, 4.4.147 and 3.18.118

Filed under
Linux

GNOME Development Updates

Filed under
GNOME
  • libgepub + rust

    In 2010 I was working with evince, the gnome PDF document viewer, trying to add some accessibility to PDF files. That was really hard, not because GTK+ or ATK technology but because the PDF format itself. The PDF format is really cool for printing because you know that the piece of paper will look the same as the PDF doc, and because it's vector it scales and don't loose quality and files are smaller than image files, but almost all PDF files have not any metadata for sections, headings, tablets or so, this depends on the creation tool, but it's really hard to deal with PDF content text, because you don't know event if the text that you're reading is really in the same order that you read from the PDF.

    After my fight against the PDF format hell and poppler, I discovered the epub format that's a really simple format for electronic books. An epub is a zip with some XML files describing the book index and every chapter is a xhtml and xhtml is a good format compared to PDF because you can parse easily with any XML lib and the content is tagged and well structured so you know what's a heading, what's a paragraph, etc.

    So I started to write a simple C library to read epub files, thinking about add epub support to evince. That's how libgepub was born. I tried to integrate libgepub in evince, I've something working, rendering with webkit, but nothing really useful, because evince needs pages and it's not easy to split an xhtml file in pages with the same height, because xhtml is continuous text and it adapts to the page width, so I give up and leave this branch.

  • My final report for GSoC 2018

    The Google Summer of Code 2018 is coming to an end for me, so it means that it’s time for the final report!

    [...]

    I’ve created a media (although for now it only works with pictures) viewer for Fractal. Its purpose is to easily have a better view of the images within a room, to be able to zoom in and out of them, to navigate between the different images of the room in the chronological order, to enter in a full screen mode and to save a copy of the media in the filesystem. I made a first implementation and then had to do a lot of other improvements. I’ve spent about a month working on it.

    There is still the need to improve the zoom of the media viewer as the pictures are a little bit blurred and it’s not possible to zoom beyond 100%. There are optimizations to do as the application becomes very slow when trying to zoom beyond 100% on large pictures.

  • GUADEC 2018

    A few weeks ago I attended GUADEC in Almeria, Spain. The travel was a bit of an adventure, because Julian and I went there and back from Italy by train. It was great though, because we had lots of time to hack on Fractal on the train.

    [...]

    On Monday I attended the all-day Librem 5 BoF, together with my colleagues from Purism, and some community members, such as Jordan and Julian from Fractal.

    We talked about apps, particularly the messaging situation and Fractal. We discussed what will be needed in order to split the app, make the UI adaptive, and get end-to-end encryption. Daniel’s work on the database and Julian’s message history refactor are currently laying the groundwork for these.

    On the shell side we talked through the design of various parts of the shell, such as keyboard, notifications, multitasking, and gestures. Though many of those things won’t be implemented in the near future, we have a plan for where we’re going with these, and getting designers and developers in one room was very productive for working out some of the details.

    We also discussed a number of exciting new widgets to make it easier to get GNOME apps to work at smaller sizes, such as a new adaptive preferences window, and a way to allow modal windows to take up the entire screen at small sizes.

Software: Security Scanners, Cockpit and Terminalizer

Filed under
Software
  • 5 Tools to Scan a Linux Server for Malware and Rootkits

    There are constant level of high attacks and port scans on Linux servers all the time, while a properly configured firewall and regular security system updates adds a extra layer to keep the system safe, but you should also frequently watch if anyone got in. This will also helps to ensure that your server stays free of any program that aims at disrupting its normal operation.

    The tools presented in this article are created for these security scans and they are able to identity Virus, Malwares, Rootkits, and Malicious behaviors. You can use these tools make regularly system scans e.g. every night and mail reports to your email address.

  • Cockpit 175

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 175.

  • Terminalizer - Tool to Record Terminal Sessions on Linux

    Have you ever thought about how you can record your Linux terminal? Terminalizer is a fancy and highly customizable CLI tool that records and renders terminal activity and can make an animated GIF image from it. It can work well on Ubuntu, CentOS, Arch Linux, SUSE, RedHat, Fedora, etc. In this tutorial, we'll take you through how you can install and capture/record your Linux terminal.

    Before installing terminalizer, ensure you have Node.js and npm installed.

Linux Foundation and Kernel News

Filed under
Linux

Nitrux – A Beautiful, Portable Apps-Focused Linux Distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Nitrux is a free, beautiful, open-source Ubuntu-based distribution with a focus on beauty, user efficiency, and portable universal app formats. It currently ranks #76 on DistroWatch’s popularity hits per day chart.

It supports portable universal application formats including AppImage and Snaps and is based on the latest Ubuntu development branch and the latest KDE Plasma desktop version.

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OpenSUSE/SUSE: openSUSE Leap 42.3 and Kubic's Change of Heart

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.3 Operating System Support Extended Until June 30, 2019

    The openSUSE Project announced this week that they'd extended support for the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system with six more months to allow more users to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 release.

    Launched on July 26, 2017, the openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system is based on SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 and the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series. Like previous openSUSE Leap 42 point releases, openSUSE Leap 42.3 was supposed to receive 18 months of support, until January 2019.

  • An Exciting New Direction

    It’s been over a year since we started the Kubic project, and it’s worth looking back over the last months and evaluating where we’ve succeeded, where we haven’t, and sharing with you all our plans for the future.

  • OpenSUSE Kubic Shifts Focus Following Self-Reflection

    OpenSUSE's Kubic project that has been home to their container-related technologies as well as the atomicly-updated openSUSE "MicroOS" will be making some changes.

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More in Tux Machines

Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal. Read more

5 open source strategy and simulation games for Linux

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist. So, can someone who only uses free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely ever to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it. Read more

Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released
    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release. This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes. Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.
  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update
    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms. The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.
  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements
    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.
  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November
    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date. This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.
  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options
    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems. The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018. Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”
  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support
    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier. Read more