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Wednesday, 22 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 12:32am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 12:32am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2014 - 12:31am
Story Unity Celebrated Its 4th Birthday At The Beginning Of This Week Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 10:13pm
Story NGINX Turns 10, Usage Up 400% In The Last 4 Years Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 9:59pm
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of 4MLinux Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 9:36pm
Story TIL Ubuntu Sees iPhones, iPads as USB Mass Storage Devices, Windows & Mac OS Don't Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 8:58pm
Story Why The Future Of Digital Security Is Open Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 8:11pm
Story Quebec is ripe for open-source software Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 7:59pm
Story HP's Helion Continuity Services adds Linux cluster support and more Rianne Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 7:54pm

Nintendo sets Revolution launch price at $99?

Filed under
Gaming

The latest Nintendo Revolution rumor to hit the web is a doozie… “Nintendo may be aiming for a $99 launch price.” Can we expect the system to be only a fraction as powerful as the PlayStation 3 or Xbox 360?

MySQL wants to be Ikea of the database market

Filed under
Software

MySQL AB's imminent release of its MySQL 5.0 database will introduce new enterprise features making it more competitive with Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft, but the company's CEO has maintained that it is more interested in mimicking the run-away success of Swedish retailer Ikea than any of the established database vendors.

The 2005 Ig Nobel Prize Winners

Filed under
Misc

Winners include a team who watched a glob of tar drip from a funnel for 80 years, a veterinarian for dog testicle replacement, and a team for their article on "Pressures Produced When Penguins Pooh."

Is Google taking over the universe?

Filed under
Web

Seemingly every week brings a new announcement from the Mountain View Googleplex, each one bigger than the last and each provoking wide-eyed speculation -- and confusion -- about the 7-year-old company's ambitions.

n/a

OSS in the enterprise? Show me the money

Filed under
OSS

Eric Raymond's recent attack on a Microsoft recruiter has sharply divided the Linux community, with some applauding his bluntness and honesty, while others accused him of exaggerating his own achievements.

MVU to offer free courses in Linux OS Principles

Filed under
Linux

The University of Malta brings together 11 universities and institutions from across Europe and the Mediterranean region to provide high-quality online courses: LINUX Operating Systems Principles and Computer Integrated Manufacturing. And for a limited time, they're free.

Dutch police arrest suspected computer hackers

Filed under
Security

Dutch police have arrested three men suspected of stealing credit card and bank account data by hacking into over 100,000 personal computers worldwide, public prosecutors said on Saturday.

Breaking America's grip on the net

Filed under
Web

After troubled negotiations in Geneva, the US may be forced to relinquish control of the internet to a coalition of governments.

Over one hundred GNOME developers at summit

Filed under
Linux

Over one hundred people showed up for today's morning presentation, and nearly every one was a developer for GNOME or a related technology: X, Linux, or a desktop application.

Net blackout sparks talk of new rules

Filed under
Web

A feud between big network companies that has blacked out swaths of the Internet for thousands of people is prompting calls for government involvement, and may help trigger a rewrite of telecommunications laws affecting the Net.

Come on in the Water's Fine

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Ark Linux 2005.2 rc3 was released a day or two ago and offered the new KDE 3.5 beta2 packages. I was interested in taking a look. After some doing I have an Ark install and am suffering from mixed feelings.

Melinda Gates Leaves Bill for Linus: Penguins at 11!

Filed under
Misc

Now, I'm not going to mention any names, but a lot of folks have been reporting that Microsoft is "not going to release a version of its Office suite software for open-source rival Linux." Are we to start seeing reports of "dog bites man" and "sun rises in the East" next?

GPX2 Linux PMP and Game Console

Filed under
Gaming

You are not into the mainstream Sony PSP and Nintendo DS portable game consoles? Then take a look at the new Gamepark GPX2 Linux powered portable game console.

In related news: World's first PSP Trojan

Linux "processor affinity" explained

Filed under
Linux

IBM's DeveloperWorks has published a story describing how the Linux 2.6 kernel supports "processor affinity" -- that is, ensuring that a particular process runs on a particular processor or set of processors within a multi-processor machine. Processor affinity can improve real-time performance, as well as cache hit-rates in complex calculations.

Shows Don't Have to Be Big to Be Useful

Filed under
Linux

Picture, if you will, the Ohio LinuxFest nestled snugly within the huge confines of the Greater Columbus Convention Center, all 750 guests, of the geek and nerd end of the spectrum, sharing the same convention center with, I kid you not, the Top Talent Star Model Search. It was like the worst cliché come to life.

Improved Thunderbird Still Fails Enterprise Test

Filed under
Software

Review: Beta 1.5 of the open-source Thunderbird e-mail client is looking a lot better, but it still lacks calendar functions.

SCO Loses Battle Against IBM In Linux Lawsuit

Filed under
Legal

Ruling from the bench, federal Magistrate Brooke Wells said SCO wasn't entitled to more memos, e-mails, programmer notes, work plans and strategy papers on IBM's conversion to Linux, the open-source system challenging Microsoft Corp.'s market dominance in network servers.

In related News: IBM drops patent claims against SCO

Real-world projects show Linux at work

Filed under
Linux

In the recent past, IT pros came to LinuxWorld Conference and Expo to hear if Linux worked in the enterprise. At this week's show, they're hearing about enterprise Linux at work. From keynotes to the exhibit floor, true tales of enterprise Linux implementations abound.

MySQL Storage Engines

Filed under
Software

In this article, we're not going to concentrate on the technical aspects of the different MySQL storage engines (although we will inevitably have to look at some of these elements), instead we will concentrate on how and where these different engines can be best employed. To achieve this, we'll have to look at some of the fundamental issues before moving on to the specifics of each engine type.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GameMode 1.5

  • Feral's GameMode 1.5 Now Supports Changing The CPU Governor Differently For iGPUs

    With Feral's GameMode 1.5 the big change facing users is for those running integrated graphics. In a change led by an Intel open-source graphics driver developer, GameMode now supports setting an alternative CPU frequency scaling governor for integrated graphics use-cases. Up to now GameMode has defaulted to always using the "performance" CPU frequency scaling governor for normally delivering the best performance, but for integrated graphics that in some situations can lead to lower performance. Due to the integrated graphics and CPU cores sharing the same power envelope, ramping up the CPU performance can throw the graphics performance out of balance and at least for some games lead to lower performance. So with GameMode 1.5, the user can now opt for "powersave" or an alternative governor instead when using an iGPU.

  • Feral Interactive's open source 'GameMode' system performance booster has a new release

    Feral Interactive don't just port a lot of games to Linux, they also work on some open source bits here and there. One of their projects is GameMode, which just got a new release. GameMode is a "daemon/lib combo for Linux that allows games to request a set of optimisations be temporarily applied to the host OS and/or a game process". In simple terms, it can help ensure your Linux PC is giving the game all it can to run smoothly. Looks like someone new is handling the project too, with Alex Smith having left Feral Interactive.

Mozilla on Privacy Badger, Rust and Digital ID Systems

  • Firefox Extension Spotlight: Privacy Badger

    People can't be expected to understand all of the technically complex ways their online behavior is tracked by hidden entities. As you casually surf the web, there are countless techniques different third party actors use to secretly track your online movement. So how are we supposed to protect our privacy online if we don't even understand how the game works? To help answer this, the good folks at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (a non-profit devoted to defending digital privacy) built Privacy Badger--a browser extension designed to give you highly advanced tracking protection, while requiring you to do nothing more than install it on Firefox. No configuration, no advanced settings, no fuss. Once you have Privacy Badger installed, it automatically scours every website you visit in its relentless hunt for hidden trackers. And when it finds them, blocks them.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 322
  • What could an “Open” ID system look like?: Recommendations and Guardrails for National Biometric ID Projects

    Digital ID systems are increasingly the battlefield where the fight for privacy, security, competition, and social inclusion is playing out. In our ever more connected world, some form of identity is almost always mediating our interactions online and offline. From the corporate giants that dominate our online lives using services like Apple ID and Facebook and Google’s login systems to government IDs which are increasingly required to vote, get access to welfare benefits, loans, pay taxes, get on transportation or access medical care. Part of the push to adopt digital ID comes from the international development community who argue that this is necessary in order to expand access to legal ID. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) call for “providing legal identity for all, including birth registration” by 2030. Possessing legal identity is increasingly a precondition to accessing basic services and entitlements from both state and private services. For the most marginalised communities, using digital ID systems to access essential services and entitlements from both state and private services are often one of their first interactions with digital technologies. Without these commonly recognized forms of official identification, individuals are at risk of exclusion and denial of services. However, the conflation of digital identity as the same as (or an extension of) “legal identity”, especially by the international development community, has led to an often uncritical embrace of digital ID projects. In this white paper, we survey the landscape around government digital ID projects and biometric systems in particular. We recommend several policy prescriptions and guardrails for these systems, drawing heavily from our experiences in India and Kenya, among other countries. In designing, implementing, and operating digital ID systems, governments must make a series of technical and policy choices. It is these choices that largely determine if an ID system will be empowering or exploitative and exclusionary. While several organizations have published principles around digital identity, too often they don’t act as a meaningful constraint on the relentless push to expand digital identity around the world. In this paper, we propose that openness provides a useful framework to guide and critique these choices and to ensure that identity systems put people first. Specifically, we examine and make recommendations around five elements of openness: multiplicity of choices, decentralization, accountability, inclusion, and participation.

Red Hat/IBM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, OpenShift 4.3 and OpenSCAP

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM POWER9: An open foundation to power intelligent business decisions

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, we unveiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, the next generation of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, which provides the scale, flexibility and innovation to drive enterprise workloads across the hybrid cloud. Even with the advancements across the platform, we recognize that there’s no singular panacea to overcome every unique IT challenge. To meet these needs, Red Hat delivers specialized offerings built around Red Hat Enterprise Linux to address specific hardware, applications and environment requirements, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 continues this strategy with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions on IBM Power Systems (POWER9).

  • OpenShift 4.3: Quay Container Security Integration

    In the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 Web UI Console, we introduced a new Cluster Overview Dashboard as the landing page when users first log in. The dashboard is there to help users resolve issues more efficiently and maintain a healthy cluster. With the latest 4.3 release, we added an image security section to the cluster health dashboard card. This section will appear on the dashboard when the Container Security Operator gets installed.

  • Deploying OpenSCAP on Satellite using Ansible

    In many environments today, security is one of the top priorities. New information security vulnerabilities are discovered regularly, and these incidents can have a significant impact on businesses and their customers. Red Hat customers I talk to are frequently looking for tools they can use to help evaluate and secure their environments. One of these tools is OpenSCAP, which is included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and can perform compliance and vulnerability scanning on RHEL servers. Satellite makes OpenSCAP easier to use by allowing you to deploy the OpenSCAP agent to hosts, manage the OpenSCAP policies centrally, and to view OpenSCAP reports from the Satellite web interface.