Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Jan 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Handy Disk Image Tools Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 8:39am
Story Color Pickers Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 8:34am
Story KDE makes Qt Roy Schestowitz 27/10/2014 - 8:24am
Story The Linux desktop-a-week review: LXDE Roy Schestowitz 1 26/10/2014 - 10:57pm
Story CyanogenMOD maintains open source roots as business success looms Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2014 - 10:12pm
Story Presenting DWD, a Candidate for KDE Window Decorations Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2014 - 10:11pm
Story The Unbundling Of That Other OS At Lenovo Roy Schestowitz 26/10/2014 - 9:36pm
Story OverlayFS Finally Offered For Pulling Into Linux 3.18 Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2014 - 7:48pm
Story Pi2D2 interview Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2014 - 7:43pm
Story Btrfs RAID: Linux 3.10 To Linux 3.18 Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 26/10/2014 - 7:33pm

Hotrod Your Linksys WAP with Linux

Filed under
Hardware

A lot of Linux geeks are master scroungers, I'll wager I'm not the only who has gazed upon shiny new devices like the Linksys WRT54G and sighed "Wouldn't that be a great device for my network!"

Poor man's raid & clone script tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

Here's a short and sweet howto on setting up an easy raid array.

How Much Trouble Is Novell in?

Filed under
Misc

Novell has had better days. Sources within Novell Inc. have confirmed that the company will lay off as much as 20 percent of its work force of 5,800 employees by year's end.

n/a

Migrating apps is challenge for Munich Linux project

Filed under
Linux

"We knew from the start that migrating our many city administration-specific applications would not be easy."

Google gives $350,000 to Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Governor Ted Kulongoski today announced the contribution of $350,000 by search technology leader Google Inc. to a joint open source technology initiative of Oregon State University and Portland State University.

Open source nuclear bunker guards finance data

Filed under
OSS

Somewhere outside a remote village in Kent, we pull up to a gate smothered in barbed wire and CCTV cameras. The former Ministry of Defence site, is now owned by a data-hosting and resilience company. The Bunker is a relic of the Cold War.

Exploit published for Snort open-source IDS

Filed under
Security

Security researchers posted code on Tuesday capable of compromising computers running the most recent versions of the Snort open-source intrusion detection system.

IBM, Others to Create Open-Source Programs

Filed under
OSS

Pushing the "open source" idea deeper into computing, several companies led by IBM Corp. are teaming up to develop programs for letting big businesses uniformly manage their increasingly vast warehouses of data.

Quick and Dirty Data Extraction in AWK

Filed under
HowTos

Need to pull some data from text--maybe e-mail messages--and sort it, graph it or otherwise manipulate it? Here's an AWK script to use as a starting point.

Fetching email with Mutt

Filed under
HowTos

What do you look for in an email program? You may find it in Mutt, an easy-to-use text-based messaging client. Here's all you need to know to get started with Mutt.

Leaping Lizards, It's SUSE Linux

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I've been playing around with the boxed edition of SUSE Linux 10.0, but Novell representatives assure me that the Evaluation edition available for download through OpenSUSE.org is the same product, complete with proprietary extensions.

Did Bill Gates Invent Linux and Has He Erased the Evidence?

Filed under
Microsoft

Someone has started rearranging content on the Internet to suit their own purposes and the culprit might be a convicted monopolist. This article examines some compelling evidence and asks Congress to investigate.

klik: True click-and-run software

Filed under
Software

Debian's APT makes installing software a breeze: you just run apt-get update&&apt-get upgrade to download and install the latest versions of all your software, or apt-get install widget to install widget on your machine. Pretty easy and painless. But now there's something available that's even easier and more painless: klik.

MySQL 5.0 Now Available for Production Use

Filed under
Software

MySQL AB has announced the general availability of MySQL 5.0, the most significant product upgrade in the company's ten-year history. Starting today, MySQL 5.0 can be downloaded under the open source GPL license.

Nominations open for SA's first open source awards

Filed under
OSS

Tectonic has launched South Africa's first-ever open source software awards to recognise the software most loved by Tectonic readers as well as the SA companies they most respect.

Remastering a Custom Knoppix Distribution

Filed under
HowTos

Ever wanted your own bootable CD? Something personalized for your users and complete with all of your own Linux-based software and configuration?

Dine In Geek Heaven With Dyne:BolicII

Filed under
Linux

Multimedia producers and artists will have the power to fully customise their own tailored GNU/Linux environment on a bootable CD with the release of Dyne:bolicII by the end of the year.

NZ Inland Revenue testing Linux

Filed under
Linux

New Zealand's Inland Revenue is testing Linux on a handful of its 7000 personal computers and expects to decide next year whether to become the first government department to take a big punt on open source desktop software.

Doom 3 v. Quake 4 Performance

Filed under
Gaming

Now a story on a subject near and dear to my heart. Rarely has a game caused me to have to upgrade any hardware, but Quake 4 pushed me to upgrade my amount of ram and left me wishing I could afford more. What is it that makes it so much more demanding than doom3/roe? Although the test machine for the article is quite decked out, this could be a valuable comparison.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 RC is out

OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 is just around the corner. The team is publishing today the last milestone for current release cycle. OMLx 4.1 RC release is mostly bug fixing and update packages. Read more

Proprietary Software and Security Leftovers

  • FilelistCreator is a directory printer for Windows, macOS and Linux

    Many people organize their data into folders to quickly find what they want. The Windows operating system comes with default folders for images, videos, and downloads for example that many users of Windows use. Windows does not really provide good easily accessible options to compare the contents of two folders; this is especially the case if root folders contain hundreds of even thousands of files and folders.

  • Ragnarok Ransomware Targets Citrix ADC, Disables Windows Defender

    A new ransomware called Ragnarok has been detected being used in targeted attacks against unpatched Citrix ADC servers vulnerable to the CVE-2019-19781 exploit. Last week, FireEye released a report about new attacks exploiting the now patched Citrix ADC vulnerability to install the new Ragnarok Ransomware on vulnerable networks. When attackers can compromise a Citrix ADC device, various scripts would be downloaded and executed that scan for Windows computers vulnerable to the EternalBlue vulnerability. If detected, the scripts would attempt to exploit the Windows devices, and if successful, inject a DLL that downloads and installs the Ragnarok ransomware onto the exploited device.

  • The Risks and Potential Impacts Associated with Open Source [Ed: DevOps site gives a platform to Black Duck -- a Microsoft-connected FUD arm against FOSS]
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (iperf3, openjpeg2, and tomcat7), Mageia (ansible, c3p0, fontforge, glpi, gthumb, libbsd, libmediainfo, libmp4v2, libqb, libsass, mbedtls, opencontainers-runc, php, python-pip, python-reportlab, python3, samba, sysstat, tomcat, virtualbox, and webkit2), openSUSE (java-11-openjdk, libredwg, and sarg), Oracle (sqlite), Red Hat (libarchive, nss, and openjpeg2), Scientific Linux (sqlite), SUSE (nodejs6), and Ubuntu (cyrus-sasl2, linux, linux-aws, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux, linux-aws, linux-oem, mysql-5.7, mysql-8.0, tcpdump, and tomcat8).

  • Hacker Releases 500,000 IoT Credentials

    One of the biggest issues that IoT has is keeping everything secure. Putting devices online is a double-edged sword: it allows benevolent useful services to connect to it, but it can also allow malicious agents to harvest data from it. This was proven a few days ago when a list of 500,000 IoT credentials made their way onto the Internet. The list was posted on a hacker forum for anyone to see and use.

  • Apple is attending a meeting in Washington on Monday as a Board Member of the CARIN Alliance on Health Record Sharing

    The CARIN Alliance is meeting with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on Monday, January 27, 2020 at 3:00 pm ET in Washington, D.C., and representatives from Apple and Microsoft will be attending via phone. Apple is an official CARIN Alliance Board Member and what transpires on Monday could affect Apple's work positively regarding their Health Record-Sharing Platform beyond their current work with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  • Big tech CEOs are learning the art of the filibuster

    But it’s clear that as prevailing sentiment about big tech companies has darkened, tech CEOs see increasingly little value in having meaningful public conversations. Instead, they grit their teeth through every question, treating every encounter as something in between a legal deposition and a hostage negotiation.

    We saw this in 2018, when the New Yorker profiled Mark Zuckerberg. We saw it again last year, when Jack Dorsey went on a podcast tour. At some point this year Tim Cook will probably give a zero-calorie interview to someone, and if it’s a slow-enough news day I’ll write this column for a fourth time.

Red Hat vs. SUSE vs. Canonical Contributions To The Mainline Linux Kernel Over The 2010s

After last week looking at the AMD/Intel/NVIDIA contributions to the mainline Linux kernel over the past number of years, there were reader requests for seeing how some of the top distributions compare namely Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. These graphs today are looking at the contributions by SUSE, Red Hat, and Canonical to the mainline Linux kernel. Keep in mind this is the Git commits made from using the respective corporate domains for each organization. Read more

Linux on AMD: Audio Issue Tackled and AMD Zen 3 CPU Support

  • AMD Prepares Fix To Address Clicking Issue With Audio Playback On Raven APUs

    Unfortunately it wasn't a trouble-free experience at launch but with time Raven Ridge APUs have been getting cleaned up on Linux for a pleasant experience, thanks in part to the Google Chromebook play that has also seen these newer AMD APUs seeing HDCP content protection support and PSP / TEE trusted execution functionality. The latest overdue improvement on the AMD Raven APU front is a fix for a pesky issue during audio playback. If playing audio streams immediately one after another, clicking noises can be heard. That is in the process of being resolved thanks to a new kernel patch.

  • AMD ZEN 3 CPU Added To Official Linux Kernel With ‘Family 19H’ Indicating Launch Of Next-Gen Processors With Higher IPC Gains?

    AMD’s ZEN 3 Architecture, the next-gen evolution of the company’s powerful CPUs, is now officially a part of the Linux Family. Spotted inside the Linux Kernel are direct references to the AMD’s Zen 3 CPU microcode. Given the recent developments about the as-yet-unannounced AMD Architecture that succeeds ZEN 2, it is quite likely the company could release the new CPUs based on ZEN 3 in the coming months. And, if the leaked benchmarks and test scores are to be believed, AMD has truly pushed its processors and managed to achieve a substantial leap in processor power with lesser power draw. After giving a tough competition to Intel last year, AMD appears to be readying a new lineup of CPUs that are based on the company’s latest Architecture, the ZEN 3. Based on the 7nm Fabrication Node, the Zen 3 is the 3rd iteration of the ZEN microarchitecture, which is built using the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) lithography process.

  • AMD Zen 3 CPU Support Added To Linux Kernel As We Get Closer To Official Announcement

    It looks like we are getting more closer to the launch of AMD's Zen 3 CPUs as microcode for the upcoming lineup has been added to the Linux Kernel, as spotted by Komachi. The AMD Zen 3 line of processors are aimed to hit in the coming quarters and it looks like they are going to be a bigger upgrade than we have anticipated as many leaks and official representatives have stated. [...] However, this means that in the upcoming months, AMD is definitely bringing us more news as also stated by AMD's CEO, Dr. Lisa Su, in the 'The Bring Up' interview where she states that Zen 3 architecture is doing really well, they are excited about it and that she looks forward to talking more about it later in 2020.