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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 10 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Coming Soon: National ID Cards?

Filed under
Security

Recently passed Real ID Act undermines civil rights. Driver's licenses will become national ID cards--and Americans will be at greater risk of identity theft--under a new federal law that passed without significant congressional debate, critics charge.

Forgetting to renew domain name can be disastrous

Filed under
Web

No statistics are available, but Larkins and other experts in the field say they see a fairly constant stream of businesses letting their domain name registries lapse. That omission, in turn, can lead to breakdowns of their Web sites or their e-mail systems. Just look at some of the names that have had this happen in the past couple of years:

GAO study of RFID technology, policy seen flawed

Filed under
Security

A recently released Government Accountability Office study of radio frequency identity device security is flawed because it omits discussion of technologies and federal policies in the arena, according to smart-card industry executives.

Linux drives worldwide server sales boom

Filed under
Linux

Huge demand for Linux servers has help push the overall server market to new heights, according to IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker.

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NVIDIA Supports AMD 64 X2 Processors

Filed under
Hardware

NVIDIA announced that their entire line of NVIDIA nForce media and communications processors for AMD64 platforms fully support the new AMD Athlon 64 X2 dual-core processor.

Konstruct updated

Filed under
KDE

Konstruct updated to KDE 3.4.1. Konstruct is a build system which helps you install KDE releases and applications on your system from source tarballs.

X Factor - understanding the X window system

Filed under
Software

X was originally created in the mid-80s by a research group from MIT. Its goal was to create a windowing system quite unlike any that had been conceived before. Thus X's design differs greatly from that of other windowing systems, having designed-in support for many elements which are unique.

Is your laptop a pain in the neck?

Filed under
Hardware

Statistical information on injuries related to notebook computer use is scarce, but doctors report a steady stream of new patients who've overdone it on the machines.

Nvidia starts working on SLI 2

Filed under
Hardware

Even if ATI Crossfire defeats SLI, Nvidia has some secret horses for a new race. It is working on something that we know as SLI 2.

Andromeda galaxy larger than thought

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The Andromeda galaxy just got bigger -- three times bigger, astronomers said on Monday.

Computer show opens in Taiwan

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The world's second-largest annual computer show, Computex, opened Tuesday in Taiwan, with organizers expecting the highest number of buyers and visitors in the exhibition's 25-year history.

Japan state bans 'Grand Theft Auto' sales

Filed under
Gaming

A state in Japan has decided to ban a U.S. video game from being sold or rented to minors, after officials deemed it harmful and capable of inciting violence.

KDE 3.4.1 Release Announcement

Filed under
KDE

It's official. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.4.1, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Dual-Core Duel: AMD Beats Intel

Filed under
Hardware

First look: Two processors in one Athlon chip give performance extra oomph. You now have a choice of dual-core processors; and based on PC World tests, the winner is clearly AMD's new Athlon 64 X2.

Professor predicts open source revolution

Filed under
OSS

What began as a keynote panel on the evolving world of open source quickly escalated into a debate on the future of open source licensing when a professor of law and legal history at Columbia University took center stage.

ATI's MultiVPU solution, don't get caught in the crossfire?

Filed under
Hardware

ATI's MultiVPU solution dubbed the Crossfire will see its official debut tomorrow, but has it been worth the wait and how does it compare to NVIDIA's?

Next Debian Linux release imminent

Filed under
Linux

Developers of the Debian GNU/Linux distribution are frantically squashing software bugs in an effort to get version 3.1 out by the scheduled 6 June release date.

Big-business technologists talk up Linux

Filed under
Linux

Several IT executives at the LinuxWorld Summit last week reinforced the idea that Linux now has the technical brawn and industry support to accommodate the most demanding business applications in environments such as finance, airline reservations and stock trading.

kde 3.4.1 on mirrors

Filed under
KDE

Although not officially announced as of yet, the sources for kde 3.4.1 hit mirrors this morning. Tagged a week ago, they are now available for public consumption.

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More in Tux Machines

Qt for MCUs 1.0 is now available

Qt for MCUs enables creation of fluid graphical user interfaces (GUI) with a low memory footprint on displays powered by microcontrollers (MCU). It is a complete graphics toolkit with everything needed to design, develop, and deploy GUIs on MCUs. It enables a unified technology approach for an entire product line to create a consistent and branded end user experience. Watch the Qt for MCUs video showcasing different use cases. Qt for MCUs 1.0 has already been adopted by lead customers in Japan, Europe and the US, who have started developing their next generation product. This release has been tested on microcontrollers from NXP, Renesas and STMicroelectronics. The software release contains Platform Adaptations for NXP i.MX RT1050 and STM32F769i as the default Deployment Platforms. Platform Adaptations for several other NXP and STM32 microcontrollers as well as the Renesas RH850 microcontroller are available as separate Deployment Platform Packages. On request, Qt Professional Services can provide new Platform Adaptions for additional microcontrollers. Read more

Replicant needs your help to liberate Android in 2020

Mobile devices such as phones and tablets are becoming an increasingly important part in our computing, hence they are particularly subject to freedom and security concerns. These devices aren't simply "phones" or "tablets." They are full computers with powerful hardware, running complete operating systems that allow for updates, software changes, and installable applications. This makes it feasible to run free software on them. Thus, it is possible to choose a device that runs a free bootloader and free mobile operating system -- Replicant -- as well as fully free apps for the user. You can read more about privacy and security on mobile phones and the solutions that Replicant offers, as well as learn some valuable lessons on how better to protect your freedom on mobile devices on the Replicant Web site. Replicant is currently steered by a team of three people: Fil Bergamo, Joonas Kylmälä (Putti), and myself. At the beginning of this year, we successfully applied for funding from a program from the European Union called Next Generation Internet. We also received a sizeable donation from Handshake, which allowed us to make some significant investments. Read more

today's howtos

CVE patching is not making your Linux secure

Would you like to enhance your Linux security? Do you wonder what factors should be considered when evaluating your open source security from both – the infrastructure and the application perspectives? Are you keen to learn the Ubuntu security team approach? I’ve learned that CVE patching is indeed an important puzzle, but without a structured approach, professional tools and well-defined processes in place, your Linux environment will not be secure. What do Linux security experts say? I got inspired by all these questions during the Open Source Security Summit, which was followed by the Linux Security Summit. I really enjoyed a week full of keynotes, workshops and meaningful conversations. So much so that, in my notebook, I noted down some really good quotes about the Linux security. For instance, Kelly Hammond from Intel opened her keynote by saying that “security is like doing the laundry or the dishes – it’s never done”. Linux security is more complicated than fixing CVEs Fixing CVEs is a continuous job that all Linux security teams focus on. In his keynote, Greg Kroah-Hartman from the Linux Foundation looked at this problem from the kernel perspective. In his exact words “CVEs mean nothing for the kernel” because very few CVEs are ever going to be assigned for the kernel. A stable Linux kernel receives 22-25 patches every day without any CVE process involved. So Greg’s position on the Linux security comes down to always using the latest stable kernel and not worrying about CVEs. Read more Also: Security updates for Tuesday