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Monday, 09 Dec 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Feds to fight the zombies

Filed under
Security

Remote-controlled "zombie" networks operated by bottom-feeding spammers have become a serious problem that requires more industry action, the Federal Trade Commission is expected to announce on Tuesday

EU hits Microsoft with a deadline

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has until the end of May to come to terms with EU authorities over a long-running antitrust dispute, the European Commission has said.

Sun Belittles Geronimo, Releases Java

Filed under
Software
OSS

Sun Microsystems has expressed "serious doubts" about the usefulness of the latest Apache Foundation project to create an open source implementation of the Java 2 Standard Edition (J2SE).

Apple considers Intel for Macs - or not

Filed under
Mac

Apple Computer Inc. has been in talks that could lead to a decision soon to use Intel Corp. chips in its Macintosh computer line, the Wall Street Journal reported on Monday. But Apple said the news should be placed 'in the category of rumour and speculation'.

Open Source Accounting Options

Filed under
OSS

A new wave of freely available open source business applications is already being adopted by a significant number of small and mid-sized businesses. Among the open source applications turning up on small business desktops are word processing and spreadsheet applications like OpenOffice and accounting applications like GnuCash and Grisbi.

Apple sued for racial and sexual discrimination

Filed under
Mac

Ex-employee apparently didn't appreciate being called a "rather obese-sized black lesbian".

M$ Needs More than Tabbed Browsing for IE

Filed under
Microsoft

I am not saying that Microsoft is wrong in porting over features that have made other browsers a success, but what I really want to see in Internet Explorer is security and Microsoft's determination to continue to update Internet Explorer even if there's no "real" competition.

Analysts expect massive HP layoffs

Filed under
Misc

Hewlett-Packard is likely to lay off thousands more employees, financial analysts have projected after new chief executive Mark Hurd presented his inaugural assessment of quarterly earnings.

Ashes to ashes, brain to disk

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Death could become a thing of the past by the mid-21st century as computer technology becomes sophisticated enough for the contents of a brain to be "downloaded" on to a supercomputer, according to a leading British futurologist.

Phishers Learn to Exploit VeriSign

Filed under
Security

At least one Net scammer has co-opted the Web security-assurance company's seal of approval to offer a false impression of safety.

AMD releases a consumer electronics chip

Filed under
Hardware

First, Advanced Micro Devices went upmarket with the Opteron chip for servers. Now, it wants to go downscale into the consumer electronics market with a new line of Geode chips for gadgets.

Foresight Linux: A Short Overview

Filed under
Linux

I have been using Foresight Linux 0.8 for the last few days. Foresight is relatively new Linux distribution which tries to incorporate the latest technologies, such as Beagle, F-Spot, Howl and Hal. However, the most revolutionary feature of Foresight is Conary, the package manager.

British game makers saved by Sony

Filed under
Gaming

A team of British game makers, who lost their jobs just over six months ago, has landed a major deal with one of the biggest names in entertainment.

Here's how to handle common rudeness

Filed under
Misc

Q: What's happened to common courtesy? I'm a marketing consultant, and I've noticed increasing numbers of people don't return phone calls, expect my time for free and don't even show up for scheduled meetings. How do I handle such common rudeness?

Star Wars bootleggers face retribution

Filed under
Movies
Legal

Pirates peddling bootlegged copies of the just-released Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith will be tracked down and caught, Hollywood's chief lobbyist warned.

IBM Processors at Core of Xbox and Playstation 3

Filed under
Hardware

IBM has developed a revolutionary "Cell" processor in a joint venture with Sony and Toshiba. It has nine "brains," seven more than the dual-core processors being released by Intel and AMD, and will be featured in the PlayStation 3.

Products Placed Liberally in Video Games

Filed under
Gaming

The product placement - benign, interactive and sometimes aggressive - belongs to a growing push by advertisers to reach big-spending males from 18 to 34 who log long hours playing video games.

Five years after trial, can M$ stand up to Google?

Filed under
Microsoft

What I remember most about the Microsoft antitrust trial that I covered for Fortune magazine was how momentous it felt - surely, the antitrust trial of the century. The rest of Washington was obsessed with Monica Lewinsky. Not us. We pored through e-mail messages suggesting that Microsoft had wanted to "cut off Netscape's air supply"- Microsoft's efforts to crush Netscape was at the heart of the case - and wondered if U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson would have the nerve to break the giant in half.

Quake. Fleshed out. Up to date. Brutal.

Filed under
Gaming

Quake 4 Preview

This is no Doom III. There's no brooding tension. It immediately struck us as a brutal fusion of linear Call Of Duty wargame intensity set against the frenzied brown-tinged Quake backdrop that we all know and love. Now you actually have a name - Matthew Kane. All members of your squad have a personality as well," he adds. Quake. Fleshed out. Up to date. Brutal.

'Wave farm' project gets green light

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A pioneering commercial wave power plant, producing clean and renewable energy, is to go on line off Portugal in 2006, after a contract was signed this week, project partners announced Friday. The companies claimed the so-called "wave farm" will be the world's first such commercial operation.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Free Software program Basis Provides Advantages and Merchandise In Its Annual Fundraiser

An nameless reader writes: The Free Software program Basis is holding its annual fundraiser, with a aim of attracting 600 new members by the tip of December. (New members to date: 112.) “We’re nonetheless combating the oppressive nature of proprietary software program,” explains the marketing campaign’s net web page. “Now we have made strong inroads, and the neighborhood is as passionate as ever.” As a 501(c)(3) charity the group’s membership dues are all tax deductible, and affiliate memberships are simply $10 a month ($5 for college kids). They arrive with particular advantages together with as much as 5 electronic mail aliases within the member.fsf.org area, eligibility to hitch the nonprofit Digital Credit score Union, free admission to the annual LibrePlanet convention in Boston, and 20% reductions on FSF merchandise and GNU gear (together with this pleasant stuffed child gnu). Read more Also: Mark J. Wielaard: Software Freedom Conservancy Donor Match

Python Programming: Python 3, MicroPython, Creating Command Line Utilities and Installing/Updating Packages in Python

  • It’s Time to Upgrade to Python 3 – Time Is Running Out!

    As of January 1, 2020, Anaconda will no longer be adding new packages built for Python 2.7 to repo.anaconda.com default channels. The Python 2.7 packages available prior to that date will remain available. This means, for instance, that if there is a newly released version of TensorFlow after the first of the new year – it will not be available in defaults for Python 2.7. The one exception is that Python 2.7.18 is slated to be released in mid-April 2020 according to PEP-0373. Packages for Python 2.7.18 will be built and made available on the repo.anaconda.com defaults channel.

  • MicroPython: An Intro to Programming Hardware in Python

    Are you interested in the Internet of Things, home automation, and connected devices? Have you ever wondered what it would be like to build a blaster, a laser sword, or even your own robot? If so, then you’re in luck! MicroPython can help you do all of those things and more. [...] Python’s popularity has skyrocketed in recent years. These days, it’s used everywhere from DevOps to statistical analysis, and even in desktop software. But for a long time, there was one field where Python use was conspicuously missing. Developers working with microcontrollers had not yet adopted the language. All of that changed in 2013 when Damien George launched a Kickstarter campaign. Damien, an undergraduate at Cambridge University, was an avid robot programmer. He wanted to move the Python world from machines that worked with capacities in the gigabytes down to the kilobytes. His Kickstarter campaign was an attempt to back his development while he turned his proof of concept into a finished implementation. Many developers jumped at the chance, not only to use Python on microcontrollers but also to get an early version of Damien’s own reference hardware, which was built especially for the task! In fact, by the end of the campaign, Damien had blown past his £15,000 goal. Thanks to over 1,900 backers, he reached just shy of £100,000.

  • Creating Command Line Utilities with Python's argparse

    Most of the user-facing software comes with a visually pleasing interface or via a decorated webpage. At other times, a program can be so small that it does not warrant an entire graphical user interface or web application to expose its functionality to the end-user. In these cases, we can build programs that are accessible via a Command Line Interface, or CLI. In this post, we will explore Python's argparse module and use it to build a simple command-line tool to help us shorten URLs swiftly.

  • Learn all About Installing & Updating Packages in Python

    In this tutorial, we will learn the basics of installing, working and updating packages in Python. First, we will learn how to install Python packages, then how to use them, and finally, how to update Python packages when needed. More specifically, we are going to learn how to install and upgrade packages using pip, conda, and Anaconda Navigator. Now, before we are going to learn how to install Python packages we are going to answer the question “what is a package in Python?”

Facebook's New Linux Slab Memory Controller Saving 30~40%+ Of Memory, Less Fragmentation

Back in September we wrote about Facebook's Roman Gushchin working on a new slab memory controller/allocator implementation that in turn could provide better memory utilization and less slab memory usage. This wasn't ready in time for the 5.5 kernel but a revised patch series was sent out last week. Roman continues to talk up this new slab memory controller with it turning out much better than the existing slab memory code, which he says in Facebook production workloads is only seeing 45~65% slab utilization and at best case around 85%. This controller rework aims for better slab utilization and also sharing of slab pages between multiple memory cgroups. The memory accounting is done now per-object rather than per-page, among other changes. Read more Also: KubeCon gets bigger, the kernel gets better, and more industry trends