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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 16 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:35am
Story Leftovers: GNOME Software Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:33am
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:32am
Story Leftovers: Debian Family Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:31am
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:30am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:30am
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:29am
Story GNU/FSF Roy Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:28am
Story How I ended up working in open source healthcare Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:16am
Story 4MRecover 15.0 System Recovery Live CD Enters Beta, Includes TestDisk 7.0 Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2015 - 11:11am

What is “The Linux Community”?

Filed under
Linux

Fedora is often called a non-community distribution because it is heavily supported by Red Hat and Red Hat has Veto rights in the board. Also, together with claims that Ubuntu is no Community distribution either it raises the question who and what defines the word community in this regard.

An Interview with KDE-Edu Developers

Filed under
Interviews

We are here today to talk about the developers of the KDE-Edu Project. The purpose of this interview is to feature and present their work and motivation, which is often not as well-known or regarded as other, more prominent work within the KDE project.

Review of Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (Alpha 5) for new users

Filed under
Ubuntu

In the same way I revisited PCLinuxOS2007 beta 2 recently using my new methods of reviewing distros I'm returning to this Alpha 5 release of Ubuntu Feisty Fawn.

Here come the Dell Linux desktops, laptops

Filed under
Linux

Dell contacted DesktopLinux.com on March 28 to let us know that the company will be releasing select desktop and notebook systems with pre-installed Linux as an option in the coming weeks.

Fast forward with a Kazehakase web browser

Filed under
Software

The second most popular web browser in the world, Firefox, is a beautiful, but heavy machine. Its biggest attraction are tabs, flexible bookmarks and RSS management and extensions. However for people who are still using systems with no abundance of main memory it can be a pain intensively using firefox throughout a day. It is just that memory hungry.

Security programming with OpenSSL - Part I

Filed under
HowTos

OpenSSL is the ubiquitous toolkit for writing security applications. It was originally written as an SSL library with specific focus on performance for x86 platrorms but today it has become the de facto standard for implementing user space security applications.

ISO Master Review

Filed under
Reviews

ISO Master is an open-source, easy to use, graphical CD image editor for Linux and BSD. Basically, you can use this program to extract files from an ISO, add files to an ISO, and create bootable ISOs - all in a graphical user interface. It can open both ISO and NRG files but can only save as ISO. ISO Master is based on bkisofs - a library for reading, modifying and writing ISO images.

Yod’m - Like Beryl for Windows

Filed under
Microsoft

I recently stumbled upon (literally) Yod’m (Yet another desktop manager 3d) which looks a bit like Linux’s Beryl, but for Windows XP and Windows Vista.

Bit More Here.

---

US 'no longer technology king'

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The US has lost its position as the world's primary engine of technology innovation, according to a report by the World Economic Forum.

The US is now ranked seventh in the body's league table measuring the impact of technology on the development of nations.

A deterioration of the political and regulatory environment in the US prompted the fall, the report said.

Linux to help the Library of Congress save American history

Filed under
Linux

The Library of Congress, where thousands of rare public domain documents relating to America's history are stored and slowly decaying, is about to begin an ambitious project to digitize these fragile documents using Linux-based systems and publish the results online in multiple formats.

RIP: Community Linux (1991-2007)

Filed under
Linux

The idea that Linux is primarily a community-based project based on the work of thousands of independent, idealist hackers died a quiet death at home on March 27.

Torvalds 'pretty pleased' about new GPL 3 draft

Filed under
OSS

Linus Torvalds, leader of the Linux kernel project and a major figure in the open-source programming movement, said Wednesday he's "pretty pleased" with changes in a third draft of the General Public License (GPL) released Wednesday.

Novell position on GPL3 draft

Filed under
SUSE

The Free Software Foundation has published today a third draft of the GPL3 license. The FSF had indicated leading up to this draft that it would be addressing some concerns it had with the Novell-Microsoft agreements in the draft. Here’s Novell’s position on the new draft:

High-integrity software developers benefit from free and open source tools

Filed under
OSS

The late-morning conference sessions at the 2007 Military Technologies Conference boasted a presentation, titled "Why High-integrity Software Requires Open Source Tools," by Robert Dewar, president and CEO of AdaCore.

Ubuntu : I'm linux bound

Filed under
Ubuntu

I finally got Ubuntu installed. I had downloaded Ubuntu three or four times from the generic site and burnt 6 CDs of the resulting stuff but each time my computer said the CDs were corrupt and aborted the installation.

Linux: Driver Support is Key

Filed under
Linux

We received over 500 comments to my last post about expanding Linux onto more of the Dell product line. As noted on IdeaStorm, we're working on it.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Pros: Secure; robust and evolved virtualisation; improved security management and IPv6 support

Cons: Little in the way of eye-candy

With the recent release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0, Red Hat is both following and bucking server operating-systems trends we’ve witnessed in past tests of Novell’s SuSE Linux and Microsoft’s Longhorn beta code.

AMD 8.35.5 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

Ch-ch-ch-changes... Not expecting to hear that with today's driver release?

Free software games, the return

Filed under
Gaming

All my previous posts were pretty much technical in essence, and several were related to my work habits: 3D desktop productivity enhancements, virtual machines, etc.

This time, I’ll go back to something else entirely: GAMES!

Run’n’jump

You miss the mustachied plumber? Why not get a penguin or a blob instead? They can jump too, you know.

SuperTux

Mozilla and eBay Working Together to Make the Auction Experience Easier

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla and eBay International AG today announced they are working together to improve the online auction experience for people in France, Germany and the United Kingdom.

Together, Mozilla and eBay are collaborating on new technology and approaches to enable eBay users to stay up to date with their auctions more easily from within Firefox regardless of where they are on the Web.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Minimalist vs Modern - Linux Mint 20.1

    It's time to check out the two desktop environments built for the latest release of Linux Mint 20.1 - MATE and Cinnamon!

  • Google Docs Replacement | Self-Hosted 36

    Our favorite Google Docs killer with markdown support has a big update. We explain how we host it and why we love it.

  • Announcing Istio 1.8.2

    This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.8.1 and Istio 1.8.2

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/02 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers, Somewhere, I read, 2021 will be the year of the Linux desktop. Do you agree? Let’s make it the year of Tumbleweed on the desktop. In any case, Tumbleweed has been steadily rolling with 5 snapshots published during this week (0107, 0108, 0110, 0111, and 0113).

  • Ubuntu 21.04 To Expand The Use Of Phased Package Updates - Phoronix

    With this spring's release of Ubuntu 21.04 there is more widespread use of "phased updates" for gradually rolling out new stable release updates to help avoid any regressions en masse from coming to light. For years the Ubuntu desktop has employed this phased updates strategy while now with it being plumbed into APT, Ubuntu Server and other versions will by default make use of phased updates. Going back a number of years in Ubuntu has been Phased Updates that wired into Update Manager has led to the gradual rollout of new stable release updates over a period of about two days. This has been done gradually to ensure that no regressions or potential big problems hit all Ubuntu users at once by over the course of many hours exposing more Ubuntu users to these updates.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (flatpak, ruby-redcarpet, and wavpack), Fedora (dia, mingw-openjpeg2, and openjpeg2), Mageia (awstats, bison, cairo, kernel, kernel-linus, krb5, nvidia-current, nvidia390, php, and thunderbird), openSUSE (cobbler, firefox, kernel, libzypp, zypper, nodejs10, nodejs12, and nodejs14), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), Slackware (wavpack), SUSE (kernel, nodejs8, open-iscsi, openldap2, php7, php72, php74, slurm_20_02, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (ampache and linux, linux-hwe, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-hwe-5.8, linux-lts-xenial).

  • Project Zero: Introducing the In-the-Wild Series

    At Project Zero we often refer to our goal simply as “make 0-day hard”. Members of the team approach this challenge mainly through the lens of offensive security research. And while we experiment a lot with new targets and methodologies in order to remain at the forefront of the field, it is important that the team doesn’t stray too far from the current state of the art. One of our efforts in this regard is the tracking of publicly known cases of zero-day vulnerabilities. We use this information to guide the research. Unfortunately, public 0-day reports rarely include captured exploits, which could provide invaluable insight into exploitation techniques and design decisions made by real-world attackers. In addition, we believe there to be a gap in the security community’s ability to detect 0-day exploits.

  • Google series on in-the-wild exploits

    The Google Project Zero blog is carrying a six-part series exploring, in great detail, a set of sophisticated exploits discovered in the wild.

OSS Leftovers and Mostly Openwashing

  • Debarshi Ray: Toolbox — After a gap of 15 months

    About a year ago, Ondřej Míchal single-handedly rewrote Toolbox in Go, making it massively easier to work on the code compared to the previous POSIX shell implementation. Go comes with much nicer facilities for command line parsing, error handling, logging, parsing JSON, and in general is a lot more pleasant to program in. Plus all the container tools in the OCI ecosystem are written in Go anyway, so it was a natural fit. Other than the obvious benefits of Go, the rewrite immediately fixed a few bugs that were inherently very cumbersome to fix in the POSIX shell implementation. Something as simple as offering a –version option, or avoiding duplicate entries when listing containers or images was surprisingly difficult to achieve in the past. What’s more, we managed to pull this off by retaining full compatibility with the previous code. So users and distributors should have no hesitation to update.

  • Rav1e 0.4 Released For Faster Rust AV1 Encoding - But Still Is Quite Slow

    Rav1e 0.4 was released on Wednesday as the latest version of this Rust-written AV1 video encoder. The rav1e 0.4 release represents a speed-up for the encoder but depending upon the preset level can still be at fractions of a frame per second. Rav1e 0.4 development was focused on providing faster performance for x86_64 and AArch64 (64-bit ARM) architectures. A wide variety of optimizations made faster performance possible depending upon the speed level.

  • LCA: Catch Talks by OSI Staff and Community

    Linux.conf.au (aka LCA) is a lovely community conference based in Australasia that will be entering its 22nd year in 2021. The volunteer-run event is known for getting deeply technical on topics varying from the inner workings of the Linux kernel to the inner workings of dealing with communities. This year's event takes place on January 23rd - 25th and is accessible is digital and accessible to everyone, whether you live "down under" or not. Our General Manager, Deb Nicholson will be presenting on how to build and maintain kinder, gentler and more sustainable open source communities in her talk, "Move Slow and Try Not to Break Each Other." on Sunday at 11:40am.

  • Data@Mozilla: This Week in Glean: Proposals for Asynchronous Design

    At last count there are 14 proposals for Firefox on Glean, the effort that, last year, brought the Glean SDK to Firefox Desktop. What in the world is a small, scrappy team in a small, scrappy company like Mozilla doing wasting so much time with old-school Waterfall Model overhead?! Because it’s cheaper than the alternative. Design is crucial before tackling difficult technological problems that affect multiple teams. At the very least you’re writing an API and you need to know what people want to do with it. So how do you get agreement? How do you reach the least bad design in the shortest time?

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (December 2020)

    In December there were 241 alerts generated, resulting in 39 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the December 2020 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics, followed by a review of the year. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

  • CIB spins off new allotropia software GmbH

    “With everyone from SMBs to governments now going fully digital, we see significant demand for integrated, secure, and GDPR-conforming digital document lifecycle solutions,” says Uli Brandner, CEO and owner of CIB labs. “We have continuously invested into LibreOffice to play an important role in our solution stack, and are now taking the next step by setting up a dedicated company with a laser-sharp focus on delivering fully cloud-based versions – in-line with our ongoing push for browser-based products. Being able to build on the multi-decade value of existing OpenSource solutions, as well as the equally many years of experience of our LibreOffice engineering team there, gets us both a significant head start, and the confidence to deliver quality solutions.” LibreOffice engineering consultancy and “LibreOffice powered by CIB” will remain an important part in CIB’s portfolio, now being served and further improved by allotropia software GmbH. “For our customers, this generates the win-win-win situation of having an established, rock-solid partner like CIB, delivering state-of-the-art opensource software, plus the agility of an innovative startup developing new solutions”, adds Uli Brandner.

  • Open Source Management & Strategy Training Program Launched by The Linux Foundation
  • Start 2021 Off With a New Career in the Cloud! Cloud Engineering Bootcamps are on Sale
  • Instructor-Led Kubernetes Security Fundamentals Course Now Available
  • Kubernetes Security Essentials Course Now Available
  • New, Free Training Course Covering Basics of the WebAssembly Now Available
  • Tips for Starting Your New IT Career in 2021!

Programming Leftovers

  • Improve your software product delivery process performance using metrics (II)

    During the previous article I explained the process to follow, using the simplest possible model to describe a software product delivery process, to measure and improve its performance, following a data driven improvement kata as a way to promote a continuous improvement culture . Despite providing extremely valuable information, once we have gone through the described process for a few iterations, the limitations of such a simple model will become evident. We will need to add complexity into our model, getting closer to the real software product delivery process.

  • SEGGER’s complete J-Link software now available for Linux on ARM [Ed: Reposted from elsewhere (or press release)]

    SEGGER’s entire portfolio of J-Link software is now available for Linux on ARM, for both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms. This includes both the command-line programs and GUI tools such as J-Flash, J-Flash SPI, J-Scope, the J-Link Configurator and the GUI version of the GDB Server. “J-Link can now be used on Raspberry Pi and other ARM-based machines, without any limitations,” says Alex Grüner, CTO at SEGGER. “Small single-board ARM computers now offer the same functionality as x86 powered machines. The inexpensive Raspberry Pi and similar boards are now viable options, especially in test farms and production environments.”

  • JavaScript survey: React everywhere, Jest, Webpack on the up... if only it had static typing, sigh developers • The Register

    The 2020 State of JavaScript report, a survey of over 23,000 developers globally, has revealed growing use of WebPack and Jest, continuing high use of React, Express and TypeScript, and that top of the wishlist is no longer better browser compatibility, but rather static typing. JavaScript is the most used programming language according to most rankings. Originally called LiveScript and designed in 10 days in 1995 by Netscape's Brendan Eich to work alongside Java Applets, the little language has become the universal language. Trends in the JavaScript ecosystem are therefore significant, but the fact that Webpack tops the list of most used technologies says a lot about modern JavaScript development. Webpack is a module bundler which runs on Node.js and has plugins for tasks such as minifying JavaScript using Terser. Webpack does tree shaking, meaning that it strips out unused code.

  • YANUB: yet another (nearly) useless blog: Taking advantage of Ruby in QSoas

    First of all, let me all wish you a happy new year, with all my wishes of health and succes. I sincerely hope this year will be simpler for most people as last year !

  • 10 reasons to develop Quarkus applications on Red Hat OpenShift - Red Hat Developer

    Combining Quarkus with Red Hat OpenShift provides an ideal environment for creating scalable, fast, and lightweight applications. Quarkus significantly increases developer productivity with tooling, pre-built integrations, application services, and more. This article presents 10 reasons why you should develop your Quarkus applications on OpenShift.