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Thursday, 04 Jun 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

MIT & Quanta to Team Up

Filed under
Hardware

Mark Jewell writes, "Quanta Computer Inc. and the Massachussets Institute of Technology said Friday they are teaming up on a $20 million, five-year project to get PCs, laptops, cell phones, and handhelds to work together seamlessly, intuitively and in sync."

First cell phone was a true 'brick'

Filed under
Sci/Tech

On this slow news day, Dave Carpenter looks back to 1983 when the ground breaking Motorola DynaTAC, $3,995 2-pound brick hit the market.

Krolopp, now 74 and retired, still gets a "warm fuzzy feeling" thinking about the DynaTAC and knowing that "a handful of us did something that was really significant."

Performance Tweaks & Tips

Filed under
Howtos

Has your system seemed to have slowed down lately or perhaps it never performed the way you thought it should. Do you ever exclaim, seems my friend's computer is much faster than mine... or the dreaded, my XP is faster than linux? Bite your tongue and check out a few things on your gentoo install.

I don my asbestos house robe and share a few things I've learned from my time with gentoo. Actually these principals can be applied to any linux installation, but I had gentoo in mind when writing them.

Earth's oldest object on display

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A tiny grain of crystal thought to the oldest object on Earth has gone on public display for one day only in the US state of Wisconsin. The zircon, found in Australia in 2001, led to a reappraisal of early Earth. It suggests the early Earth was much cooler than previously thought, meaning life-forming elements such as oceans were formed earlier too.

An Offer He Could Refuse

Filed under
Movies
Gaming

Sunday sniping Francis Ford Coppola is hopping mad at Paramount for turning his "Godfather" into a violent video game (due out October 2005).

After four months home confinement, reporter has no regrets

Filed under
Legal

The boredom was worse than reporter Jim Taricani expected during his four month home confinement sentence for protecting a source. Too much TV watching, house cleaning and reading left him looking for ways to kill time, and appreciating the freedom he'd taken for granted.

The newsman was sentenced in December after being found in criminal contempt for refusing to give up his source. Taricani is one of several journalists nationwide who have become locked in First Amendment battles with the government over confidential sources.

Female networks create opportunities

Filed under
Misc

Lara Tusher was stuck.

After spending six years developing Velocity Art and Design into a successful home-furnishing retail presence in Seattle and on the Web, Tusher became so wrapped up in the daily details of her business that she couldn't turn her attention to the development of the company's marketing, Web site and catalog.

News Publishers and Internet Industry Urge Reversal in Apple Case

Filed under
Mac
Misc

A coalition of news publishers and two Internet industry trade associations filed friend-of-the-court briefs yesterday in Apple v. Does, urging the California Court of Appeal to protect the confidential sources of journalists and defend email privacy. The news publishers argued that the trial court incorrectly allowed trade secret law to trump First Amendment rights.

U.S. slips lower in coding contest

Filed under
Software

In what could be an ominous sign for the U.S. tech industry, American universities slipped lower in an international programming contest.

Uncle Sam Leads Top 12 Spam Producing Nations

Filed under
Security

Based on the analysis, experts found that the United States topped the Dirty Dozen chart once again, exporting an average of 35.70%, or more than one-third of the world's total volume of spam.

New Linux Distro Expected To Be a "Solaris Killer"

Filed under
Linux

A stealth start-up in Athens, Ohio whose name is Spliced Networks LLC is on the threshold of announcing a new Linux distribution that its young CTO John Buswell describes as "unlike anything currently on the market." It will supposedly eliminate "bloated package management," allowing for upgrades or rollbacks in less than 30 seconds. To compete, Red Hat, Novell and Mandrakesoft would reportedly have to "completely re-engineer their solutions away from RPM and other package management systems."

Advanced Micro to launch dual chips early

Filed under
Hardware

Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is expected to launch its new dual-core processing chips later this month, well ahead of schedule, a person briefed on the matter said on Friday.

Shares of AMD rose 90 cents, or 5.6 percent, to $17.09 on the New York Stock Exchange.

ICANN adds .jobs, .travel domains

Filed under
Misc

Two new top-level domains, .jobs and .travel, will soon come to the Internet after the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) approved the two domains on Friday.

Torvalds looking for new Linux home

Filed under
Linux

Linux leader Linus Torvalds has begun looking for a new electronic home for his project's source code after a conflict involving the current management system, BitKeeper.

DOOM 3: Resurrection of Evil

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Doom 3 was like a brief honeymoon of really cool stuff, but the buzz wore off early, especially in the wake of Half-Life 2, CoD: United Offensive and Brothers in Arms. Yeah, it looks damn good. But can it hold a conversation? I'll get back to you on that. While the engine has few peers (of this generation, only the HL2 renderer is about as good), the AI turns out to be oversimplified, the gameplay dated and repetitive, and the environment just too damned dark. But hey, there's an expansion pack called Resurrection of Evil that adds more levels, a continuation of the story, a couple more weapons and several new monsters. For the grab-you-by-the-short-hairs MSRP of $34.99, it better be pretty good, right? After all, you can get a full retail game for that much, on sale brand new, or a few months old at regular price. Increased cost of development, you say? Come on, now. This is being built on top of existing code. Cry me a river!

New Linux initiative targets Germany's financial sector

Filed under
Linux

German banks and insurance companies interested in implementing open-source Linux in their operations can click to a new portal for information about products, suppliers, applications and more.

Judge Sentences Spammer to Nine Years

Filed under
Security
Legal

A Virginia judge sentenced a spammer to nine years in prison Friday in the nation's first felony prosecution for sending junk e-mail, though the sentence was postponed while the case is appealed.

ATI: Linux Driver 8.12.10 released

Filed under
Software

ATI has released new proprietary linux drivers for their 3D acceleration hardware.

Issues Resolved:

  • Unreal Tournament 2004: Intermittent hesitation is no longer noticed while playing Onslaught
  • Moving or resizing pseudocolor windows no longer results in corruption being noticed on the desktop
  • The name and version number of the X.org server is now detected correctly at runtime.

Half Life 2: Aftermath

Filed under
Gaming

The news most of us have been waiting for has finally been confirmed: Valve is readying the first expansion pack for the unanimously acclaimed Half-Life 2.

Big brother will watch you in the office

Filed under
Security

HITACHI is demonstrating a system which means that if you're in the office you'll be able to run, but you may not be able to hide.

Geeez...

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • [Attackers] Target California University Leading Covid-19 Research

    UCSF confirmed it was the target of an “illegal intrusion” but declined to explain which portion of its IT network may have been compromised. Researchers at the university are among those leading American antibody testing and clinical trials for possible coronavirus treatments, including a recent study on anti-malarial drugs touted by President Donald Trump as a possible remedy, then refuted by scientists.

  • NSA flags email vulnerability
  • Improve your security with two-factor authentication [Ed: But Google is not security but a MITM with close ties to NSA]

    Two-factor authentication (or simply 2FA) is a way of authentication where a user must provide additional verification after username and password login. The form of verification can be a string of characters delivered via text message or generated with TOTP client. Two-factor authentication improves security because compromised username and password are not enough to get the account breached. This article will explain how to use TOTP clients for two-factor authentication and why TOTP is better than many other two-factor methods. As an example, I will show how to enable and set up TOTP client Google Authenticator in Google’s services. [...] Next, I will show you how to enable two-factor authentication in Google services. After that, we will install Google Authenticator and enable 2FA with Google account. In this guide, I will log in to a Google account with a desktop browser, which is very similar to how the process works for other services. Login to your Google Account and proceed in the menu to Security> Signing into Google > 2-step verification. If two-step verification is enabled on your Google account, you should already see an option for Google Authenticator on this page, and you can continue to the next part of this article (Installing Google Authenticator). Otherwise, continue this part. Google has now opened a window where is introduced two-step verification. You can read it through and then click forward.

  • Linux security: Protect your systems with fail2ban

    Security, for system administrators, is an ongoing struggle because you must secure your systems enough to protect them from unwanted attacks but not so much that user productivity is hindered. It's a difficult balance to maintain. There are always complaints of "too much" security, but when a system is compromised, the complaints range from, "There wasn't enough security" to "Why didn't you use better security controls?" The struggle is real. There are controls you can put into place that are both effective against intruder attack and yet stealthy enough to allow users to operate in a generally unfettered manner. Fail2ban is the answer to protect services from brute force and other automated attacks.

  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (firefox-esr), Fedora (firefox and prboom-plus), Oracle (bind), Red Hat (firefox), and SUSE (osc).

GNU Linux-Libre 5.7

  • GNU Linux-Libre 5.7 Released - Drops Intel iGPU Security Fix Over Arrays Of Numbers

    The GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu kernel was released following last weekend's Linux 5.7 kernel release. But the info-gnu mailing list was slow and thus just hitting the wire today for the latest version of this sanitized version of the Linux kernel. One interesting change in GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu is dropping the Intel Gen7 "iGPU Leak" security mitigation over not liking the sources.

  • GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu
    GNU Linux-libre 5.7-gnu cleaning-up scripts, cleaned-up sources, and
    cleaning-up logs (including tarball signatures) are now available from
    our git-based release archive git://linux-libre.fsfla.org/releases.git/
    tags {scripts,sources,logs}/v5.7-gnu.
    
    Tarballs and incremental patches were still slowly getting compressed as
    I started writing this.  It took me so long to write this up that by now
    they are probably ready to be published, along with scripts and logs, at
    <https://www.fsfla.org/selibre/linux-libre/download/releases/5.7-gnu/>.
    
    We will not create or publish binary xdeltas any more: tarballs and
    patches are now created with git archive and git diff, respectively.
    So, even if you want a tarball, you don't have to wait for the
    compression to complete on our end.  Update the git repo, and run:
    
      git checkout logs/v5.7-gnu &&
      git archive --format tar --prefix=linux-5.7/ \
        sources/v5.7-gnu > linux-libre-5.7-gnu.tar &&
      gpg --verify linux-libre-5.7-gnu.tar.sign
    
    This will get you the same tarball and signature that, once compressed,
    will be published at the usual place.  Note that the --prefix= was
    maintained like that of the corresponding upstream release, so that
    anyone already used to downloading our tarballs and dealing with the
    unusual prefix doesn't have to make any changes.
    
    
    No changes were required to the cleaning up scripts since -rc7-gnu,
    already published under the new release procedure, though a little too
    late for it to be useful.
    
    The git repository is already populated with scripts, sources and logs
    for past releases since Linux-libre became a GNU project; earlier
    releases might be added at a later time.  The imported sources, scripts,
    logs and signatures are the result of long-time hard work by Jason Self,
    in the git repo https://jxself.org/git/linux-libre.git.  Nearly all of
    the branches, tags and commits in the new repo are taken directly from
    there, though I've verified all of the sources/ and scripts/ tags and
    corrected a few mismatches that AFAICT followed from errors in the SVN
    repository.  The main exception is the storage of logs and tarball
    signatures; he'd used git notes, but those didn't quite work for me, so
    I turned them into a separate tree of tags with logs and tarball
    signatures.  Alas, I failed to bring the .log signatures into it.  Will
    fix, and move the tags.
    
    
    The 5.7 upstream release removed the i1480 uwb driver, that we used to
    clean up, but added a crypto driver for the Marvell OcteonTX CPT, for
    Mediatek MT7622 WMAC, for Qualcomm IPA, for the Azoteq
    IQS620A/621/622/624/625 Multi-function device, for IDT 82P33xxx PTP
    clock, and a Modem Host Interface (MHI) bus driver, all of which
    required cleaning up.  Actually, the MHI bus one is tentative: I
    couldn't quite figure out what it is that it loads, so I've
    conservatively blocked it in the likely case it is a piece of non-Free
    Software.
    
    Some further adjustments were required on account of the introduction of
    the function firmware_request_platform to the firmware-loading
    interface, of the usual assortment of false positives all over, and blob
    adjustments in AMD GPU, Arm64 DTS files, Meson VDec, Realtek Bluetooth,
    m88ds3103 dvb frontend, Mediatek mt8173 VPU, Qualcomm Venus, Broadcom
    FMAC, Mediatek 7622 and 7663 wifi, silead x86 touchscreen; of the
    movement of the cleaned-up mscc phy driver (and new blob names in it)
    and wd719x documentation within the source tree; and of something very
    unexpected: the introduction of binary blobs as arrays of numbers in
    source code for gen7 i915 gpus.
    
    
    I unfortunately could not find correspoding sources for the new binary
    blobs introduced in such an old-fashioned way, and they're big enough
    and not regular enough that I could just assume them to be data rather
    than code, so I've removed them.  If you come across source code for
    those bits, or can explain to me how transparent and trivial they are
    once they're disassembled with existing Free tools, I'll be very glad to
    restore them.
    
    
    Other relevant changes were made to the deblob-check script:
    
    - its self-test now uses a safer $echo instead of echo to feed itself
    the test patterns, and to complain in case they fail; some of the
    patterns got mangled (unintended backslash transformations) by /bin/sh's
    echo in Trisquel 8.  That's a well-known shell portability issue that we
    had a fix for, but that somehow hadn't come up before in the context of
    the testsuite.
    
    - I moved the block of default suspicious patterns after the Linux- or
    patch-specific ones.  This enables these default patterns to be
    overridden by longer matches (e.g., cleaning up a trailing comma along
    with the new Intel presumed blobs).  In Non-Deterministic Automata-based
    regular expression engines, such as those in GNU awk and GNU sed, this
    doesn't make a difference, because the longest match is always
    preferred, but in engines that process alternatives left-to-right and
    take the first match, like Python's and Perl's, there was no way to
    override the blob sequence as needed.  Now there is.
    
    
    For up-to-the-minute news, join us on #linux-libre of irc.gnu.org
    (Freenode), or follow me (@lxoliva) on Twister <http://twister.net.co/>,
    Secure Scuttlebutt, GNU social at social.libreplanet.org, Diaspora* at
    pod.libreplanetbr.org or pump.io at identi.ca.  Check the link in the
    signature for direct links.
    
    
    Be Free! with GNU Linux-libre.
    
    
    What is GNU Linux-libre?
    ------------------------
    
      GNU Linux-libre is a Free version of the kernel Linux (see below),
      suitable for use with the GNU Operating System in 100% Free
      GNU/Linux-libre System Distributions.
      http://www.gnu.org/distros/
    
      It removes non-Free components from Linux, that are disguised as
      source code or distributed in separate files.  It also disables
      run-time requests for non-Free components, shipped separately or as
      part of Linux, and documentation pointing to them, so as to avoid
      (Free-)baiting users into the trap of non-Free Software.
      http://www.fsfla.org/anuncio/2010-11-Linux-2.6.36-libre-debait
    
      Linux-libre started within the gNewSense GNU/Linux distribution.
      It was later adopted by Jeff Moe, who coined its name, and in 2008
      it became a project maintained by FSF Latin America.  In 2012, it
      became part of the GNU Project.
    
      The GNU Linux-libre project takes a minimal-changes approach to
      cleaning up Linux, making no effort to substitute components that
      need to be removed with functionally equivalent Free ones.
      Nevertheless, we encourage and support efforts towards doing so.
      http://libreplanet.org/wiki/LinuxLibre:Devices_that_require_non-free_firmware
    
      Our mascot is Freedo, a light-blue penguin that has just come out
      of the shower.  Although we like penguins, GNU is a much greater
      contribution to the entire system, so its mascot deserves more
      promotion.  See our web page for their images.
      http://linux-libre.fsfla.org/
    
    What is Linux?
    --------------
    
      Linux is a clone of the Unix kernel [...]
    
    (snipped from Documentation/admin-guide/README.rst)
    

Android Leftovers

NexDock Touch Laptop Shell Features a Touchscreen Display, an Optional Magnetic Mount for Your Phone

NexDock is a Motorola Lapdock alternative launched in 2016 with a 14.1″ non-touch display, a built-in battery, and a Bluetooth keyboard. It was followed by NexDock 2 last year with a Full HD display and a USB-C port. The company has now announced they had started manufacturing NexDock Touch based on NexDock 2 but adding a touchscreen display and some other features, and the company has also developed a magnetic mount – compatible with all NexDock models – to conveniently attach your phone to the side of the display. Read more Also: Rikomagic DS02 Android Digital Signage Player Supports 4G LTE or WiFi Connectivity