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Saturday, 24 Oct 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:50pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:49pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:47pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:45pm
Story DevOps principles resonate with student Linux program Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:22pm
Story How to do fast, repeatable Linux installations Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:20pm
Story Federal open source software activities are growing Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 3:10pm
Story A Trip Down (Computer) Memory Lane Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 2:54pm
Story New version of SecureDrop, open-source whistleblower submission system originally created by Aaron Swartz Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2015 - 2:38pm

Does Your Wi-Fi Hotspot Have an Evil Twin?

Filed under
Security

Identity thieves are going wireless in their quest to steal your personal info.

You may want to think twice before logging into a public wireless hotspot. Sure, grabbing a few minutes of connectivity is convenient, but identity thieves are discovering that, through "evil twin" attacks, hotspots are a great way to steal unsuspecting users' private information. So how does an evil twin attack work?

This Week's Movies: The Jacket and The Pacifier

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

The Pacifier staring Vin Diesel was your basic Disney feel good movie. Formulaic, by-the-numbers plot and cookie cutter script are dressed up by an admirable performance from my favorite action hero and yours, Vin Diesel.

The Jacket was an imaginative pychological mystery with an intriguing plot and engaging dialogue. The actors did a marvelous job of portraying their characters. They made an unbelievable scenario plausible.

Circumventing Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Notwithstanding the fact it will be many years before very many corporate users might be able to work in a "Microsoft-free" environment, there appears to be significant effort being put forth to make it a reality. From the geekiest tech pubs, like the Java Developer's Journal to august ones such as The Wall Street Journal, circumventing Microsoft is a hot topic.

Report finds surge in on-line attacks

Filed under
Security

Internet attacks on businesses and other organizations increased by about 28 per cent in the second half of 2004 compared with the first six months of the year, and hackers are setting their sights on the rapidly emerging mobile-computing market, warns a report on Internet security to be released Monday.

original content

Will Longhorn be short on features?

Filed under
Microsoft

While Microsoft continues raising Longhorn, rivals are seizing the operating system's extended adolescence to develop competing feature sets of their own.

The already scaled-back version of Longhorn is still roughly 18 months from shipping, and with the expected technical advances by Linux competitors during that time, Microsoft's estimable industry influence to sell the product as currently constituted will be severely tested.

Computer Addiction or Healthy Enthusiam?

Filed under
-s

Are you a computer addict? ... or is someone you love a computer addict?

If so, you are not alone.

I have this friend who I believe has become addicted to her computer. It started out innocently enough with the purchase of a computer to do her bookkeeping, keep in touch with long distant friends and relatives, or a little light reading. Over the next year or so she began to spend more and more time on it and less and less with her friends. She became withdrawn from society and stopped participating in activities she used to enjoy. Call her anytime day or night and in asking "wha'cha doing?" she states "playing on the computer". I jokingly told her "I think you are addicted to that thing".

NYPL Digital Gallery

Filed under
Web

The New York Public Library is making more than 275,000 images available for personal use. Print and frame these vintage maps, rare prints and photos and create your own personal art gallery.

Link.

Google Gmail accounts are bottomless barrels

Filed under
Web

PLENTY OF US use Google's Gmail accounts on a daily basis. I, for instance, obtained my first account back in early June, 2004. It only took me 10 months to fill Google's until then considered "huge" storage space. See, one gigabyte is not so much after all when you start leaving all your email on the remote server.

Back in February, I started getting nervous when the space-metre at my Gmail account hit "95%". I asked my contact at Google in the UK what would happen when the account reached 100%. Would email start bouncing back to sender? Would I be alerted and given the option to "upgrade" for a fee to a bigger storage space?

UK games industry 'needs support'

Filed under
Gaming

More software and games are being sold overseas than are imported, a good sign for the economy, said the report. It shows the interactive entertainment industry is doing financially better than film and television industries. The rising cost of making games has meant many studios have closed however, sending talent overseas.

A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64

Filed under
Reviews
Submitted by Anonymous

Anonymous writes, "It took about 10-12 minutes to install. I selected the default installation. You need all 3 cd's if you are doing the default install though it appears to only need 3-4 packages from the 3rd cd.

Boot up speed was about the same as the x86 version. The noticable difference came after logging into the desktop. This is where you begin to notice the speed difference from accessing the menus to launching applications.

After cable recall, Xbox's still frying

Filed under
Microsoft

14 million games console owners are still at risk of waking up to find their Xbox has become an ex-box. For when Microsoft issued a safety advisory for Xbox customers last month, it failed to address the underlying problem.

Amazon tightens rules for sellers

Filed under
Web
Fraud by third-party merchants could hurt brand integrity, some experts say

John Wocher bought the camera of his dreams from a seller on Amazon.com with nary a second thought, gleefully anticipating its arrival after wiring $4,549 to zShop merchant awesomediscount.com in January.

As February approached, Wocher stepped up the frequency of his e-mails with the seller, asking for the UPS tracking number, his concern growing after he had so amicably arranged the wire transfer from his home in Japan.

Schoolyard bullies get nastier online

Filed under
Web

When Joanne had a row with a longtime friend last year, she had no idea it would spill into cyberspace.

But what started as a spat at a teenage sleepover swiftly escalated into a three-month harangue of threatening e-mails and defacement of her Web log. "It was a nonstop nightmare," says Joanne, 14, a freshman at a private high school in Southern California. "I dreaded going on my computer."

US Advisory panel recommends more federal R&D spending

Filed under
Security

The Presidential IT Advisory Committee (PITAC) has recommended the federal government sharply increase its spending on cybersecurity R&D and shift the focus to fundamental, long-term solutions to security challenges.

"The IT infrastructure is highly vulnerable to premeditated attacks with potentially catastrophic effects," PITAC warned in a letter submitting the report, titled Cyber Security: A Crisis in Prioritization, to the president. "These vulnerabilities put the nation's entire critical infrastructure at risk."

Game bill picks up steam in Illinois

Filed under
Gaming

A bill introduced into the Illinois State House last December would supersede current ESRB ratings when it comes to video games with "violent and sexually explicit" content. The focus would be on isolating games deemed to have content not suitable for those under the age of 18 and would also attach a fine to retailers who violate the restriction on sales of those games.

$5m daily fine beckons for bad boy Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Although the European Commission's statements are diplomatic to the point of opacity, there's no mistaking what it thinks of the latest turn in the Microsoft antitrust saga. The Commission doesn't think Microsoft's trying hard enough, and it has canvassed widespread industry support to bolster its position. From a Microsoft document unearthed by ZDNet, and still available here [PDF 450kb], we can see why even long time Redmond partners are losing their patience.

n/a

Gentoo 2005.0 Now Shipping!

Filed under
Gentoo

Gentoo Linux 2005.0 for x86 is now complete, and we will begin fulfilling x86 pre-orders today! AMD64 and PowerPC should start shipping very shortly as well.

Please note that 2005.0 is not yet available for download on Gentoo mirrors -- the Store is getting 2005.0 a week in advance of it appearing on various Gentoo mirrors worldwide. This is a good thing, as it will give us several days to catch up on Store pre-orders.

The strange decline of computer worms

Filed under
Security

Although windows-centric, theregister has published an article on the lessening numbers of "Slammer-style worms". They attribute this decline to "the widespread use of XP SP2 and greater use of personal firewall" rendering "worms far less potent in the same way that boot sector viruses died out with Windows 95 and the introduction of Office 2000 made macro viruses far less common."

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More in Tux Machines

'This was bigger than GNOME and bigger than just this case.' GNOME Foundation exec director talks patent trolls and much, much more

Patent assertion entities: do not pick a fight with open source. It won't end well for you. This is the message from GNOME Foundation executive director Neil McGovern, who will speak on the subject at the Open Source Summit Europe next week. McGovern talked to The Register ahead of the event on patents, Microsoft, and more. The open-source outfit develops the default desktop environment on major Linux distributions including Ubuntu and Red Hat. In late August 2019, Rothschild Patent Imaging filed a lawsuit against the GNOME foundation claiming that GNOME Shotwell, a photo manager, infringed one of its patents. “We didn't receive a letter before the court documents were filed or any sort of warning, it was just filed and then within a week there was a settlement request for $75,000,” McGovern told us. Read more

Debian Janitor: Hosters used by Debian packages

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor. The Janitor knows how to talk to different hosting platforms. For each hosting platform, it needs to support the platform- specific API for creating and managing merge proposals. For each hoster it also needs to have credentials. At the moment, it supports the GitHub API, Launchpad API and GitLab API. Both GitHub and Launchpad have only a single instance; the GitLab instances it supports are gitlab.com and salsa.debian.org. This provides coverage for the vast majority of Debian packages that can be accessed using Git. More than 75% of all packages are available on salsa - although in some cases, the Vcs-Git header has not yet been updated. Of the other 25%, the majority either does not declare where it is hosted using a Vcs-* header (10.5%), or have not yet migrated from alioth to another hosting platform (9.7%). A further 2.3% are hosted somewhere on GitHub (2%), Launchpad (0.18%) or GitLab.com (0.15%), in many cases in the same repository as the upstream code. Read more Also: Multiple git configurations depending on the repository path

Benchmarks and Graphics Leftovers: x86, Zink, and Navi

  • Intel Core i7 1165G7 Tiger Lake vs. AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U Linux Performance

    For the Intel Tiger Lake Linux benchmarking thus far with the Core i7 1165G7 on the Dell XPS 13 9310 it's primarily been compared against the Ryzen 5 4500U and Ryzen 7 4700U on the AMD side since those are the only Renoir units within my possession. But a Phoronix reader recently provided me with remote access to his Lenovo ThinkPad X13 with Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U (8 cores / 16 threads) for seeing how the Tiger Lake performance compares against that higher-end SKU. Phoronix reader Tomas kindly provided SSH access to his ThinkPad X13 with Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U and 16GB of RAM. The Ryzen 7 PRO 4750U is quite close to the Ryzen 7 4800U with 8 cores / 16 threads but graphics capabilities in line with the 4700U. He's been quite happy with the ThinkPad X13 as a replacement to the Dell XPS 13 for business usage and has been running it with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the Linux 5.8 kernel.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Catching Up

    A rare Saturday post because I spent so much time this week intending to blog and then somehow not getting around to it. Let’s get to the status updates, and then I’m going to dive into the more interesting of the things I worked on over the past few days. Zink has just hit another big milestone that I’ve just invented: as of now, my branch is passing 97% of piglit tests up through GL 4.6 and ES 3.2, and it’s a huge improvement from earlier in the week when I was only at around 92%. That’s just over 1000 failure cases remaining out of ~41,000 tests. For perspective, a table.

  • AMD 'Big Navi' 3DMark Firestrike results shared by HW testing firm

    The Linux specialists over at Phoronix have noticed that the AMD Linux driver has been tweaked to add support for a new graphics card dubbed the "navi10 blockchain SKU". It comments that the only visible difference in support for this card vs existing Navi 1X support, from the driver perspective, is that the patches disable the Display Core Next (DCN) and Video Core Next (VCN) support - basically creating a 'headless' Navi 1X graphics card. Cryprocurrency is showing signs of a resurgence in popularity and values, and some are worried that the latest and greatest GPUs from both Nvidia and AMD will be plucked from retailers even faster if they are viable mining platforms. It has been reported that AMD is trying to make sure retailers follow certain distribution practices with its upcoming Radeon RX 6000 series products, to make sure they are distributed to gamers and enthusiasts rather than scalpers and such like. An initiative like creating appealing crypto-specific Navi 1X products might help everyday consumers get their hands on a new Navi 2X graphics card too.

Does the Snap Store Use Too Much Memory?

This week I noticed that the Snap Store app on my Ubuntu 20.10 laptop uses a tonne of memory, even when it’s not running — we’re talking more memory than the main GNOME Shell process uses, and that is always running! Naturally I assumed something in my config was to blame. I do make heavy use of Snap apps — don’t worry I use plenty of Flatpak and PPAs too. I’m pretty polyamorous when it comes to packaging formats and I did install using an Ubuntu 20.10 daily build. Therein lay bugs. I know the caveats. All good. Don’t mind. Whatever. Read more