Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 09 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:36pm
Story Zorin OS 12 Ubuntu-based Linux distribution now available -- a Windows 10 alternative Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:28pm
Story Getting started with Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:23pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:21pm
Story High School's Help Desk Teaches Open Source IT Skills Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:15pm
Story What’s New with Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8? Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:07pm
Story Kali Alternative: BackBox Linux 4.7 Arrives With Updated Hacking Tools Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:05pm
Story Linux Distributions vs. BSDs With netperf & iperf3 Network Performance Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 8:00pm
Story City of Rome: all new software should be open source Rianne Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 7:58pm
Story SparkyLinux 4.5.1 MinimalGUI and Absolute 14.2.2 Roy Schestowitz 07/12/2016 - 7:49pm

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Fedora 25 review

Filed under
Red Hat
Reviews

Even when dealing with the various Wayland oddities and issues, Fedora 25 is a great distribution. Everything is reasonably polished and the default software provides a functional desktop for those looking for a basic web browsing, e-mail, and word processing environment. The additional packages available can easily turn Fedora into an excellent development workstation customized for a developer's specific needs. If you are programming in most of the current major programming languages, Fedora provides you the tools to easily do so. Overall, I am very pleased using Fedora 25, but I am even more excited for future releases of Fedora as the various minor Wayland issues get cleaned up.

Read more

Must have Ubuntu Packages

Filed under
Ubuntu

For most people, any default Ubuntu installation will meet their needs. Ubuntu provides users with Web browsing, email, along with various communication tools right out of the box. Heck, even basic backups are provided...although you must take the time to configure it.

Putting all of that aside for a moment, let's consider which "must have Ubuntu packages" aren't included by default. In this article, I'll share my top list of must have Ubuntu packages and explain why I rely on each of them.

Read more

Red Hat OpenStack Platform

Filed under
Red Hat

The adoption of OpenStack in production environments has burgeoned, necessitating increased requirements for enhanced management and seamlessly integrated enterprise capabilities.

Numerous enterprises worldwide rely on Red Hat's offerings in the OpenStack space—that is, Red Hat OpenStack Platform, a highly scalable, open Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) platform designed to deploy, scale and manage private cloud, public cloud and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) environments.

Read more

PayPal Reduces Costs 10x With Open Source CI

Filed under
OSS

The bigger you are, the more small efficiencies add up. Manivannan Selvaraj's talk from LinuxCon North America gives us a detailed inside view of how PayPal cut operating costs by a factor of ten, while greatly increasing performance and user convenience.

Everything has to be fast now. We can't have downtimes. No going offline for maintenance, no requesting resources with a days-long ticketing process. Once upon a time virtual machines were the new miracle technology that enabled more efficient resource use. But that was then. Selvaraj describes how PayPal's VMs were operating at low efficiency. They started with a single giant customized Jenkins instance running over 40,000 jobs. It was a single point of failure, not scalable, and inflexible.

Read more

Turn Raspberry Pi 3 Into a Powerful Media Player With RasPlex

Filed under
HowTos

I have hundreds of movies, TV shows and music that I have bought over the years. They all reside on my Plex Media Server. Just like books, I tend to buy these works and watch them once in awhile, instead of relying on "streaming" services like Netflix where content isn’t always available forever.

If you already have Plex Media Server running, then you can build an inexpensive Plex Media Player using Raspberry Pi 3 and RasPlex. Plex Media Server is based on open source Kodi (formerly XBMC), but is not fully open source. Plex Media Center has a friendly interface and it’s very easy to set up a media center (See our previous tutorial on how to install it on a Raspberry Pi 3 or on another dedicated Linux machine).

Read more

7 Linux predictions for 2017

Filed under
Linux

Last year I made a set of predictions of events that I thought would happen in the tech world (focused primarily on Linux and free software). I was mostly right. This has emboldened me to make another set of predictions for 2017. I have no inside knowledge on any of these—I am basing this entirely on the twin scientific principles of star maths and wishy thinking.

Read more

GTK Graphics

Filed under
GNOME
  • GTK Lands A Big Refactoring Of OpenGL Code

    In addition to Red Hat's Benjamin Otte working on a Vulkan renderer for GTK4's GSK, he's also been working on a big refactoring of the OpenGL code that's now been merged to master.

    OpenGL is very important for GTK4 as it will play a big role in rendering with GSK. With this "large GL refactoring", a big clean-up was done of the OpenGL GDK code, affecting the X11, Win32, Wayland, and Mir code too. Some of the specific work includes no longer using buffer-age information, passing the actual OpenGL context, and simplifying the code. More details via this Git commit.

  • A Vulkan Renderer For GNOME's GTK+ GSK Is In Development

    A Vulkan back-end is in development for GNOME's GTK's tool-kit new GTK Scene Kit (GSK) code.

    Benjamin Otte has begun experimenting with a Vulkan back-end for GTK's GSK code with GTK Scene Kit being one of the big additions in development for the major GTK+ 4.0 milestone. GSK implements a scene graph to allow for more complex graphical control of widgets and other improvements to its graphics pipeline. GSK was merged back in October and currently uses OpenGL for rendering while there is now a branched Vulkan renderer.

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Early Benchmarks Of GCC 7 On Linux x86_64 With An Intel Core i7 6800K

Filed under
Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the GCC 7 compiler having entered its stage three, feature development is basically over so it's a great time to begin running more benchmarks of this big compiler update that will be officially released as GCC 7.1.0 in early 2017. Up today are benchmarks of the latest GCC 7.0 development snapshot compared to GCC 6.2 and GCC 5.4 on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E system running Ubuntu 16.10.

Read more

Also: LLVM's LLD Linker Gets Faster Performance (Parallelized ICF)

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • 7 Things to do After Installing KDE Plasma

    Even for other Linux users, KDE Plasma can seem like a different operating system. Except for a few standards like LibreOffice, the apps are different, and so is the design philosophy, which tends to cram in every possible feature. As a result, once they install, users are likely to wonder what to do next.

  • KDE Framworks 5 Content Snap Techno

    In the previous post on Snapping KDE Applications we looked at the high-level implication and use of the KDE Frameworks 5 content snap to snapcraft snap bundles for binary distribution. Today I want to get a bit more technical and look at the actual building and inner workings of the content snap itself.

    The KDE Frameworks 5 snap is a content snap. Content snaps are really just ordinary snaps that define a content interface. Namely, they expose part or all of their file tree for use by another snap but otherwise can be regular snaps and have their own applications etc.

    KDE Frameworks 5’s snap is special in terms of size and scope. The whole set of KDE Frameworks 5, combined with Qt 5, combined with a large chunk of the graphic stack that is not part of the ubuntu-core snap. All in all just for the Qt5 and KF5 parts we are talking about close to 100 distinct source tarballs that need building to compose the full frameworks stack. KDE is in the fortunate position of already having builds of all these available through KDE neon. This allows us to simply repack existing work into the content snap. This is for the most part just as good as doing everything from scratch, but has the advantage of saving both maintenance effort and build resources.

  • Calligra 3.0 Is Ready As A Qt5 / KDE Frameworks 5 Office Suite

    It's been quite a while since last having anything to report on the KDE Calligra open-source graphics/office suite while surprisingly this morning it was pleasant to see Calligra 3.0 tagged for release.

  • KDE Applications 16.12 Up to Release Candidate State, Final Arrives December 15

    The KDE development team was proud to announce the availability of the Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming KDE Applications 16.12 software suite for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment.

    Work on KDE Applications 16.12 started about a month ago, on November 10, when the third and last maintenance update of the current stable KDE Applications 16.08 release was announced, marking the end of life of the series. Until today, KDE Applications 16.12 received a Beta development version, tagged as build 16.11.80, and now we're seeing the Release Candidate, tagged as build 16.11.90.

64-bit Raspberry Image and OpenStack at SUSE

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Leap 42.2 gets 64-bit Raspberry Image

    The latest release from openSUSE has new images available for the Raspberry Pi and joins SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Raspberry Pi in becoming the initial distributions with 64-bit for the Raspberry Pi 3.

    The 64-bit image of openSUSE Leap 42.2 for the Raspberry Pi 3 has been out for a couple weeks.

    “The ARM and AArch64 Images for openSUSE Leap 42.2 are not a once-only release,” said Dirk Mueller. “They get continuously updated and include fixes as the Leap 42.2 port matures over time. These are the first usable images, and more variants with more fixes will come over time.”

  • OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Does A 64-bit Spin For The Raspberry Pi 3

    Following SUSE Linux Enterprise Server as being available in a 64-bit edition catered to the Raspberry Pi 3, openSUSE developers have now released a 64-bit image of Leap 42.2 for the RPi3.

  • http://ostatic.com/blog/suse-buys-hpes-openstack-and-cloud-foundry-assets-talent

    Back in November, the Cloud Foundry Foundation, home of an industry-standard platform for cloud applications, announced that SUSE had increased its engagement and support of Cloud Foundry by becoming a Platinum member.

    Now, SUSE has entered into an agreement with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) to acquire technology and talent that will expand SUSE's OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. In addition, the company announced that it will accelerate its entry into the growing Cloud Foundry Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) market, and said that the acquired OpenStack assets will be integrated into SUSE OpenStack Cloud.

Pico-ITX SBC runs Ubuntu on Braswell

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

DFI announced an Intel Braswell based “BW051” Pico-ITX SBC with up to 8GB DDR3L, mini-PCIe, SATA 3.0, mSATA, and Linux support.

DFI, which earlier this year tapped Intel’s “Braswell” generation of SoCs for its BW968 COM Express Compact Type 6 module, has now chosen Braswell for a Pico-ITX SBC. The 100 x 72mm BW051 ships with 4-6W Braswell processors including dual or quad-core Celeron models, the quad-core 1.6GHz Pentium N3710, and quad-core, 1.04GHz Atom x5-E8000.

Read more

Shuttleworth Foundation/Mozilla Foundation Overlap

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

  • Helen Turvey Joins the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors

    Today, we’re welcoming Helen Turvey as a new member of the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors. Helen is the CEO of the Shuttleworth Foundation. Her focus on philanthropy and openness throughout her career makes her a great addition to our Board.

    Throughout 2016, we have been focused on board development for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation boards of directors. Our recruiting efforts for board members has been geared towards building a diverse group of people who embody the values and mission that bring Mozilla to life. After extensive conversations, it is clear that Helen brings the experience, expertise and approach that we seek for the Mozilla Foundation Board.

  • Why I’m joining Mozilla’s Board, by Helen Turvey

    For the last decade I have run the Shuttleworth Foundation, a philanthropic organisation that looks to drive change through open models. The FOSS movement has created widely used software and million dollar businesses, using collaborative development approaches and open licences. This model is well established for software, it is not the case for education, philanthropy, hardware or social development.

Games for GNU/Linux

Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Mesa 12.0.4 Promises 15% Performance Boost for Radeon Users on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    The Mesa problem in Ubuntu Linux is about to be resolved very soon, after the game developers behind the UK-based Feral Interactive video game publishing company urged Canonical to update the software to a most recent version.

    The Mesa 3D Graphics Library is a unique open-source implementation of the OpenGL graphics API for Linux-based operating systems, and it includes drivers for Intel, Radeon, and Nvidia graphics cards. But it looks like Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was shipping with a pretty old version of Mesa.

  • Canonical to sue cloud provider over Ubuntu images

    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has said it plans to sue an European cloud provider for distributing unofficial images of its cloud distribution despite several warnings.

    The company offers certified cloud images of Ubuntu that are guaranteed to run on specific cloud platforms such as AWS, Azure or Google.

    Performance is optimised and integrated with underlying cloud requirements, with input from the host's cloud engineers.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Linux

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Git 2.11, Xfce 4.12.3, FFmpeg 3.2.1 & Mesa 13.0.2

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports on the latest Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system. Read more

What Is A VPN Connection? Why To Use VPN?

We all have heard about VPN sometime. Most of us normal users of internet use it. To bypass the region based restrictions of services like Netflix or Youtube ( Yes, youtube has geo- restrictions too). In fact, VPN is actually mostly used for this purpose only. ​ Read
more

The Libreboot C201 from Minifree is really really really ridiculously open source

Open source laptops – ones not running any commercial software whatsoever – have been the holy grail for free software fans for years. Now, with the introduction of libreboot, a truly open source boot firmware, the dream is close to fruition. The $730 laptop is a bog standard piece of hardware but it contains only open source software. The OS, Debian, is completely open source and to avoid closed software the company has added an Atheros Wi-Fi dongle with open source drivers rather than use the built-in Wi-Fi chip. Read more