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Thursday, 26 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android/Chromebook Roy Schestowitz 25/05/2016 - 8:35am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 10:01pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 10:01pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.1.25 LTS Improves the OCFS2 Shared-Disk Cluster File System Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 9:37pm
Story Nvidia 361.45.11 Graphics Driver Released for Linux, FreeBSD and Solaris Systems Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 9:36pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 9:22pm
Story NVIDIA vs. AMD OpenGL & Vulkan Benchmarks With Valve's Dota 2 Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 8:14pm
Story Why Hyperledger wants to be the ‘Linux of blockchain’ Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 7:09pm
Story Google Nexus 6P Review: This is the Android Flagship You’re Looking For Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 7:04pm
Story Rebellin Linux Offers Best of Both Gnome Worlds Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2016 - 6:52pm

10 more pointless (but awesome) Linux terminal tricks

Filed under
Linux

One year ago, I put together a list of my favorite “pointless but awesome” Linux terminal tricks—filled with such classics as making a cow talk with “cowsay” and rainbow-coloring your terminal with “lolcat.” As was correctly pointed out to me at the time, there are a lot of ridiculous (but cool) things you can do in the terminal that didn’t make that list. So, here’s round two. You’re welcome. (Note: Some of these you will need to install using apt-get, zypper or whatever package manager your Linux distribution uses.)

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Open Source Governance: Creating a Prosperous World at Peace

Filed under
OSS

Open source solutions – primarily in software but increasingly also in hardware – cost roughly one tenth of proprietary offerings. The switch to open source software enables financial and public service scalability as well as quality sustainability at all levels of governance. Unfortunately this understanding is not widespread.

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CentOS-Based NethServer 7 Linux Adds Active Directory Integration in Third Alpha

Filed under
OS
Linux

Today, May 23, 2016, Alessio Fattorini has informed Softpedia about the release and immediate availability for download of the third Alpha build of the upcoming NethServer 7 server-oriented operating system.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • TOTP SSH port fluxing

    Beware: I would not really recommend running this software - it was only written as a joke.

  • TeslaCrypt no more: Ransomware master decryption key released

    The developer has handed over the keys to the kingdom in a surprising twist in TeslaCrypt's tale.

  • Thoughts on our security bubble

    Last week I spent time with a lot of normal people. Well, they were all computer folks, but not the sort one would find in a typical security circle. It really got me thinking about the bubble we live in as the security people.

    There are a lot of things we take for granted. I can reference Dunning Kruger and "turtles all the way down" and not have to explain myself. If I talk about a buffer overflow, or most any security term I never have to explain what's going on. Even some of the more obscure technologies like container scanners and SCAP don't need but a few words to explain what happens. It's easy to talk to security people, at least it's easy for security people to talk to other security people.

  • Ransomware Adds DDoS Capabilities to Annoy Other People, Not Just You

    Ransomware developers seem to have found another way to monetize their operations by adding a DDoS component to their malicious payloads.

    Security researchers from Invincea reported this past Wednesday on a malware sample that appeared to be a modified version of an older threat, the Cerber ransomware.

    The malware analysis team that inspected the file discovered that, besides the file encryption and screen locking capabilities seen in most ransomware families, this threat also comes with an additional payload, which, when put under observation, seemed to be launching network packets towards a network subnet.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • 19 years later, The Cathedral and the Bazaar still moves us

    Nineteen years ago this week, at an annual meeting of Linux-Kongress in Bavaria, an American programmer named Eric Raymond delivered the first version of a working paper he called "The Cathedral and the Bazaar." According to Raymond, the exploratory and largely speculative account of some curious new programming practices contained "no really fundamental discovery."

    But it brought the house down.

    "The fact that it was received with rapt attention and thunderous applause by an audience in which there were very few native speakers of English seemed to confirm that I was onto something," Raymond wrote a year later, as his treatise blossomed into a book. Nearly two decades after that early-evening presentation in Bavaria, The Cathedral and the Bazaar continues to move people. Now, however, it's not so much a crystal ball as it is an historical document, a kind of Urtext that chronicles the primordial days of a movement—something Raymond and his boosters would eventually call "open source." The paper's role in Netscape's decision to release the source code for its web browser has cemented its place in the annals of software history. References to it are all but inescapable.

  • Time to choose: Are you investing in open source or not?

    In 1996, the term "open source" didn't exist. Yet 20 years later, open source technology spans countless projects and brings together the collective talent of millions. Take a close look at any open source project or community of developers and you'll find incredible levels of speed, innovation, and agility.

    Open source participation varies wildly. Some developers devote their professional lives to open source software projects; others contribute their time and talent as an avocation. While the communities behind the software continue to grow, the technology itself is playing both a foundational role in the most important technology developments of the past 20 years and is also an integral role in the strategies powering many of today's leading organizations.

  • Open Source Employment Trends

    We often think of open source as a volunteer or community based activity community. However open source is increasingly important to companies who need to keep up with new technologies.

    The latest survey from Dice and The Linux Foundation goes beyond Linux to examine trends in open source recruiting and job seeking. The report is based on responses from more than 400 hiring managers at corporations, small and medium businesses (SMBs), government organizations, and staffing agencies across the globe and from more than 4,500 open source professionals worldwide.

  • 10 most in-demand Internet of things skills

    The Internet of things is ramping up into a multi-billion dollar industry and with it goes demand for employees with IoT skills. Here we look at the skills that employers want

Flip phones are coming back – as Motorola releases new Android RAZR

Filed under
Android

Motorola’s RAZR phone was an early noughties fashion icon – and the king of flip phones, with worldwide sales of 130 million units.

Now it’s coming back – and it might make iPhones look a bit ‘last year’.

New Motorola owner Lenovo promises a new RAZR handset next month, which will ‘flip back to the Razr days of yesteryear and get ready for the future.’

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Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Operating System Officially Released with BusyBox 1.24.2

Filed under
Linux

The Tiny Core Linux 7.1 operating system has been officially released this past weekend as the first update in the 7.x series of one of the smallest, yet extensible GNU/Linux distributions on the market.

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Red Hat Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Reproducible builds: week 56 in Stretch cycle
  • Adopting pristine-tar

    As of yesterday, I am the new maintainer of pristine-tar. As it is the case for most of Joey Hess’ creations, it is an extremely useful tool, and used in a very large number of Debian packages which are maintained in git.

    My first upload was most of a terrain recognition nature: I did some housekeeping tasks, such as making the build idempotent and making sure all binaries are built with security hardening flags, and wrote a few automated test cases to serve as build-time and run-time regression test suite. No functional changes have been made.

  • No Audio in Lubuntu? - Lubuntu Audio Configuration and Volume Control
  • Vulkan Support Might Be Implemented in Ubuntu Linux's Mir Display Server Soon

    As many of you might already know, Canonical is working hard these days on pushing the Unity 8 user interface and its convergence vision to the Ubuntu desktop.

    Unity 8 is the next-generation Unity desktop environment for the popular GNU/Linux operating system, Ubuntu Linux, and Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth promised earlier this month that it would be available, installed by default, in the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) release.

    Installed by default does not mean enabled by default, as Unity 7 will remain the main desktop environment for Ubuntu 16.10, which should see the light of day later this year, on October 20, 2016. And, of course, the new Unity 8 interface will be ready for use, without the need for users to install any special packages.

Why Linus Torvalds Doesn’t Like Using Debian Or Ubuntu Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Debian
Ubuntu

From the past 25 years, Linus Torvalds is working tirelessly to make Linux a more efficient and user-friendly computing platform. His creation is now available to the open source lovers in the form of many Linux distros that serve a wide variety of users.

Linux and open source software support the idea of choice and it acts as their driving force. However, with time, the internet is filled with tons of Linux distros based on Debian and Ubuntu-like feature

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A Minitel Terminal As A USB Linux Terminal

Filed under
Linux

If you paid a visit to France in the 1980s the chances are you’d have been surprised to see a little brown screen and keyboard sitting next to the telephones wherever you went. At the time, it was another reason apart from the food, wine, and super-fast trains to envy our Gallic cousins. This was Minitel, their take on the cutting-edge of online data services of the day.

Minitel stood apart from similar services of the day in most other countries, because of its business model. Unlike the UK’s Prestel or West Germany’s BTX for which you had to spend significant money on a terminal, the French Minitel terminals were free. Thus in the early 1980s everybody in France was busy using videotext while most of the rest of Europe was still excited by chipping bits of flint into arrow heads. Or at least, that’s how it seemed at the time to those of us who didn’t have Minitel.

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Also: We're giving away an Arduino starter kit!

Made-in-Vietnam open-source software supports IPv6

Filed under
OSS

At first, NukeViet was used to build websites and publish content on internet.

However, since the NukeViet 3.0 version launched in 2010, NukeViet has been developed to serve as a platform for the development of web-based apps.

NukeViet now has many different products, including NukeViet CMS used to operate news websites, NukeViet Portal used to make business information portals, and NukeViet Edu Gate – the information portal solution for education departments, and NukeViet Shop, used to build online sale websites.

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Time to choose: Are you investing in open source or not?

Filed under
OSS

In 1996, the term "open source" didn't exist. Yet 20 years later, open source technology spans countless projects and brings together the collective talent of millions. Take a close look at any open source project or community of developers and you'll find incredible levels of speed, innovation, and agility.

Open source participation varies wildly. Some developers devote their professional lives to open source software projects; others contribute their time and talent as an avocation. While the communities behind the software continue to grow, the technology itself is playing both a foundational role in the most important technology developments of the past 20 years and is also an integral role in the strategies powering many of today's leading organizations.

Read more

Driving cars into the future with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

To find out more, we interviewed two leaders in this emerging field. Specifically, we wanted to know how Linux and open source software are being used and if they are in fact changing the face of the automotive industry. First, we talk to Alison Chaiken, a software engineer at Peloton Technology and an expert on automotive Linux, cybersecurity, and transparency. She previously worked for Mentor Graphics, Nokia, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Then, we chat with Steven Crumb, executive director of GENIVI, who got started in open source in high-performance computing environments (supercomputers and early cloud computing). He says that though he's not a coder anymore, he loves to help organizations solve real business problems with open source software.

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BeagleBone Green Wireless, a Raspberry Pi 3 Competitor, Ships with Built-in WiFi

Filed under
Linux

SeeedStudio informed Softpedia about the availability of a new single-board computer (SBC) called SeeedStudio BeagleBone Green Wireless, the first BeagleBone board with built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE).

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Raspberry Pi-based signage stack gets Snappy

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

The Screenly signage software for the Raspberry Pi is being converted to Ubuntu Snappy Core, enabling OTA updates and transactional rollbacks.

Canonical and Screenly, which makes what it calls “the most popular digital signage solution for the Raspberry Pi,” have announced a partnership to build the Screenly signage stack on Ubuntu Snappy Core. Screenly, which is currently available in commercial (Pro) and free, open source “OSE” versions based on Raspbian Linux, is adopting the lightweight, transaction-oriented Ubuntu Core “to give its customers a stable platform that is secure, robust, simple to use and manage,” says Screenly.

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Here's What the GNOME Control Center App Will Look Like in GNOME 3.22 and Later

Filed under
GNOME

We reported at the beginning of the year that the GNOME developers are working hard on a completely redesigned UI of the GNOME Control Center application, which might land in the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop environment.

Read more

Also: GNOME Calendar App to Let Users Move Events Using Drag and Drop in GNOME 3.22

GNOME Games App to Support Atari 2600 and Atari 7800 Titles in GNOME 3.22

Solus Operating System Now Provides Out-of-the-Box Support for 32-bit Apps

Filed under
OS
Development

The Solus developers are having the time of their lives these days as part of a new, online event called Solus Hackfest 1.2, where the operating system's developers are trying to implement new features to the upcoming Solus 1.2 release.

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DisplayLink USB 3.0 Driver Now Available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Fedora Linux

DisplayLink has recently updated their DisplayLink USB 3.0 driver for the latest Ubuntu Linux operating system launched by Canonical in the last week of April 2016, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Read more

Next Generation Gear Fit 2 to run Tizen Operating System, Leaked Images

The first Gear Fit product by Samsung ran a Real Time Operating System (RTOS) and this seems to have been a good decision for them for the first generation Gear Fit. Now, as the Gear Fit 2 is on the horizon, it looks like Samsung are ready to use the Tizen Operating System in this wearable device as well. According to industry sources Samsung will introduce the Gear Fit 2 next month in Korea running Tizen. The move to use Tizen extensively in its current and future wearable products demonstrates the commitment Samsung has to the OS in this space, as we now have a smartband as well as smartwatches !!! Another future wearable product that will be using Tizen, according to Industry watchers, is tentatively called “Activity Tracker”, which would suggest a low end fitness device. Read more

Sabayon ARM Project Brings the Gentoo-Based Distro to Raspberry Pi 3 and 2 SBCs

The developers of the Gentoo-based Sabayon GNU/Linux operating system have announced a new project, called Sabayon ARM, which aims to bring the distro to Raspberry Pi devices. Read more

Ubuntu BQ Aquaris M10 Review – Part 1: Hardware

The mobile market today has practically been what former Microsoft-then-Nokia-then-Microsoft-again exec Stephen Elop loved to refer to as a two-horse race. Android and iOS have been butting heads quarter after quarter, year after year. Despite their popularity and ubiquity, neither is truly perfect and neither can really meet everyone's needs and preferences. Which leaves a little wiggle room for other platforms (that includes Windows 10) to try and fill in the gaps. This time around we are going to take a closer look at one the newer challengers, Ubuntu Touch, as it is embodied in the recent bq Aquaris M10 tablet. How does it fare against the bevy of Android, iOS, and even Windows tablets scattered throughout the market? And does it have what it takes to not only stand tall and proud but also to survive? Read on to find our verdict. Read more