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Monday, 20 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux and Linux Foundation Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:33pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:32pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:30pm
Story Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:29pm
Story The State of Plasma Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 11:01pm
Story Wine 2.2 Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 9:45pm
Story Development News:/Trools Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 6:04pm
Story Linus Torvalds at Open Source Leadership Summit Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 6:02pm
Story Linux Graphics Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:58pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2017 - 5:57pm

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Source Accessibility Tools Help Streamline Inclusive Development

    IBM is embarking on a new era of open source accessibility by releasing tooling, samples and design patterns to help streamline the development of inclusive web and mobile applications.

    IBM has released two new projects on the developerWorks/open community, AccProbe and Va11yS, to help alleviate accessibility roadblocks during the agile development process, strengthen the user experience by adhering to industry standards, and reduce costs by ensuring accessibility is done right from the beginning.

  • Software-Defined Storage Opens Up: 10 Projects to Know

    Throughout 2016, the SDS (Software-Defined Storage) category achieved many new milestones and became increasingly tied to successful cloud deployments. With SDS, organizations can manage policy-based provisioning and management of data storage independent of the underlying hardware. They can also deploy free and open source SDS solutions. Many people are familiar with Ceph and are leveraging it within their OpenStack deployments, but Ceph is far from the only relevant open source SDS project.

  • What Is Open Source Software?
  • Interview: Cloud Foundry on its 2017 awareness-raising plans for open source PaaS

    The Cloud Foundry was originally developed in-house at VMware before being handed over to EMC/VMware spin-off Pivotal Software, which, in February 2014, put in motion a plan to establish an open governance model for the PaaS. This, in turn, paved the way for the foundation to be established in January 2015.

  • Control Plane Engineering Is Key for Big Kubernetes Deployments

    If you’re interested in running a complex Kubernetes system across several different cloud environments, you should check out what Bob Wise and his team at Samsung SDS call “Control Plane Engineering.”

    Wise, during his keynote at CloudNativeCon last year, explained the concept of building a system that sits on top of the server nodes to ensure better uptime and performance across multiple clouds, creates a deployment that’s easily scaled by the ClusterOps team, and covers long-running cluster requirements.

  • Intro to Control Plane Engineering by Bob Wise, Samsung SDS

    Large, high-performance and reliable Kubernetes clusters require engineering the control plane components for demands beyond the defaults. This talk covers the relationship between the various components that make up the Kubernetes control plane and how to design and size those components.

  • Try out Firefox on Wayland easily

    Today I finally managed to compile and run a Firefox version, which was patched to work on Wayland natively. To achieve this, I used the forked and enhanced Firefox version of the Red Hat developer Martin Stransky.

    For all those who are unaware of the Wayland project, it’s an succesor to the very old, but still common X display server for Linux operating systems. Compared to X, Wayland is a lot smaller in its code base, written from scratch, far more secure and build up on the newest 3D graphic driver stack. Unfortunately not all big Linux applications support it yet. The work on Wayland compatibility for Firefox was already requested some years ago and it was not moving forward very fast. Fortunately, some days ago it looks like the first patches have been merged into master.

  • It's Now Easier Trying Firefox Wayland Support On Arch Linux & Flatpak Distributions

    Jonas Heinrich took to a Firefox branch maintained by Red Hat developer Martin Stransky to getting it working on Arch Linux, getting the Firefox build into an AUR repository, and also producing a Flatpak build of the Wayland-patched Firefox.

    With his firefox-wayland-git package via AUR, Firefox can run without any usage of XWayland. This is as upstream Firefox continues getting closer to landing all of the Wayland support upstream so it will be an out-of-the-box experience in the hopefully not too distant future.

  • RethinkDB Resurfaces With Linux Foundation

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has bought the source code to the recently mothballed RethinkDB NoSQL JSON database. It relicensed the code under the Apache License, and contributed it to The Linux Foundation.

    As we reported recently, the news was announced in October that after more than seven years of development, the company behind RethinkDB was shutting down, although RethinkDB and Horizon would continue to be available, distributed under open source licenses.

  • FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report - Fourth Quarter 2016
  • FreeBSD 12 Looking At Dropping SVR4 Binary Compatibility

    FreeBSD has long had a SVR4 (System V Release 4) compatibility layer, but FreeBSD 12 will likely do away with this support.

    Is anyone still making use of UNIX System V R4 binaries on FreeBSD? The System V Release from the late 80's... The FreeBSD developers have been trying to find out if anyone is still serious about using SVR4 binary compatibility on FreeBSD, but so far they haven't been able to find parties that are still truly caring.

  • How and Why to do Open Source Compliance Training at Your Company

    Education and communication are two essential building blocks in any open source software compliance program. Both help ensure that employees, as well as others outside the organization, possess a good understanding of the organization’s policies governing the use of open source software.

    Employee training serves as a venue to publicize and promote the compliance policy and processes within the organization and to foster a culture of compliance.

  • [Older] Open Standards and Open Source in Telecom

    “Open standards” and “open source” are two terms that can often be confused. While regular readers of this blog are likely able to differentiate, for clarification’s sake, open source is the term used for software when the original source code is freely available and can also be redistributed and modified. But it doesn’t just reference access to the source code – distribution terms of open source software must comply with its own set of criteria.

    When telecommunications was in its infancy, standards were needed and established before any technology was released. As the development of new networks and technology grows, it will mean prototypes in open source, collaborative projects, which are challenges that we’ve discussed in a previous blog post. The development of new internet-enabled mobile devices and internet service providers have brought telecommunications to the forefront, as well as trends towards cooperation between the Open Standards and Open Source communities, as previously highlighted in our blog about the need for collaboration in mobile security.

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Using Scripting Languages in IoT: Challenges and Approaches

    Scripting languages (aka Very High-Level Languages or VHLLs), such as Python, PHP, and JavaScript are commonly used in desktop, server, and web development. And, their powerful built-in functionality lets you develop small useful applications with little time and effort, says Paul Sokolovsky, IoT engineer at Linaro. However, using VHLLs for deeply embedded development is a relatively recent twist in IoT.

  • Things Every Hacker Once Knew

    One fine day in January 2017 I was reminded of something I had half-noticed a few times over the previous decade. That is, younger hackers don’t know the bit structure of ASCII and the meaning of the odder control characters in it.

    This is knowledge every fledgling hacker used to absorb through their pores. It’s nobody’s fault this changed; the obsolescence of hardware terminals and the near-obsolescence of the RS-232 protocol is what did it. Tools generate culture; sometimes, when a tool becomes obsolete, a bit of cultural commonality quietly evaporates. It can be difficult to notice that this has happened.

    This document is a collection of facts about ASCII and related technologies, notably hardware serial terminals and RS-232 and modems. This is lore that was at one time near-universal and is no longer. It’s not likely to be directly useful today - until you trip over some piece of still-functioning technology where it’s relevant (like a GPS puck), or it makes sense of some old-fart war story. Even so, it’s good to know anyway, for cultural-literacy reasons.

  • Futhark: A Pure, Functional Language For GPU Computing

    Futhark was presented earlier this month at FOSDEM as a "purely functional array language" with its compiler able to "efficiently generate high-performance GPU code."

    Futhark is a high-level, parallel-focused programming language that aims to compete with the performance of hand-written code targeting particular GPUs. Futhark hopes to be more portable across GPUs while tapping into the full GPU potential if you were writing finely-tuned code targeting a particular graphics processor. Futhark's compiler currently translates this code into OpenCL for GPU execution, but I'm told by one of the attendees at FOSDEM for this event, Futhark is also working on an approach to turn their code into pure-OpenGL for execution on GPUs without OpenCL, CUDA, or Vulkan.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Re-thinking Web App Security

    The implications of storing your data locally are quite profound.

  • ASLR^CACHE Attack Defeats Address Space Layout Randomization

    Researchers from VUSec found a way to break ASLR via an MMU sidechannel attack that even works in JavaScript. Does this matter? Yes, it matters. A lot. The discovery of this security flaw along with the practical implementation is really important mainly because of two factors: what it means for ASLR to be broken and how the MMU sidechannel attack works inside the processor.

  • The Biggest Risk with Container Security is Not Containers

    Container security may be a hot topic today, but we’re failing to recognize lessons from the past. As an industry our focus is on the containerization technology itself and how best to secure it, with the underlying logic that if the technology is itself secure, then so too will be the applications hosted.

    Unfortunately, the reality is that few datacenter attacks are focused on compromising the container framework. Yes, such attacks do exist, but the priority for malicious actors is mounting an attack on applications and data; increasingly for monetary reasons. According to SAP, more than 80 percent of all cyberattacks are specifically targeting software applications rather than the network.

4 categories of Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

There are different Linux distributions. If you just go to Distrowatch site, you will find hundreds of them listed there. Some of them even have my reviews listed. And how many distributions are NOT listed? Some of them either fail to gain registration on Distrowatch, or are in the process of that, like Zorin OS was just few years ago.

However, there are at least four distinctive categories of distributions visible in the Linux world.

Read more

Linux 4.9.10

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.10 kernel.

All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

Read more

Also: Linux Kernel 4.9.10 Has ARM, x86 and PowerPC Improvements, Updated Drivers

Linux 4.4.49

Linux Kernel 4.4.49 LTS Is a Small Patch with Some ARM Fixes and Updated Drivers

7 features Linux could borrow from other systems

Filed under
Linux

Linux (or, GNU/Linux, if you prefer) distributions are absolutely amazing—stable, fast, flexible. Your average Linux-based system is a veritable powerhouse of functionality—a tour de force of what computers can accomplish. But from time to time, other operating systems have some pretty great ideas. Here are seven of my personal favorites that Linux distributions might want to consider “borrowing.” Hint, hint. Nudge, nudge.

Read more

Hands-On: Raspberry Pi 7-inch Touch Display and case

Filed under
Linux

While writing about Kali Linux on the Raspberry Pi recently, I started thinking about portability with the Raspberry Pi. Until now, I have used a standard HDMI desktop monitor (24", 1920x1080), which doesn't exactly lend itself to portability. So I started looking for a small, portable display and a convenient case.

The first thing I realized was that there are a lot of different displays available for the Raspberry Pi. I mean really a lot -- so many that it can be pretty intimidating just trying to figure out what the differences, advantages, and disadvantages are.

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

A musician's transition from distro to distro

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I got news about Ubuntu Studio in 2007, and moved to it. As a musician and sound technician, I had used a digital Portastudio to record and mix because I enjoyed turning actual knobs when mixing. I used Ubuntu Studio for mastering in Audacity before I had the chance to upgrade all my studio equipment with a new laptop and sound card in 2010. I did a lot of research to get the best USB sound card and compatible laptop for recording. I was quite sad when I realized that even though it looked good on paper, everything didn't quite work well in reality. I could only get the card work on 16 bit in Linux, but in Windows it would record with 24 bit and 96 KHz. I felt frustrated, I was back to a dual boot life.

Then Ubuntu Studio 12.10 was released and my sound card and laptop finally played nicely together. What a joy! However, much had changed in my life with family and work, and I wouldn't be doing much recording at home for quite some time. Instead I found out I could contribute to open source without being a programmer, which had never occurred to me before. Because I had so much joy and benefit from open source I wanted to give something back. I had participated in the Ubuntu Forums for a while and reached out to the Ubuntu Studio team.

For a few years, I would contribute when I could with the little time I had available between family, work, sleep, and all the other things I wanted to dabble within the 24 hours available each day.

Read more

Also: Organizing your music: Tagging as you rip

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Samsung’s latest Artik module offers quad A9 SoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samsung has launched a new, Fedora Linux ready Artik 530 COM and development kit, which unlike the dual -Cortex-A7 Artik 520, moves to a quad-core -A9 SoC.

Read more

Best Windows Like Linux Distributions For New Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

Hey new Linux users, you may be wondering that which Linux distro to choose after seeing so many distros based on Linux. Most of you might be switching from windows to Linux and want those distros which are easy and simple, resemble like windows. So today I will cover those Linux distros whose Desktop Environment is much similar to windows, so let’s start.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Tizen Software

Filed under
Software

GNU and BSD

Filed under
GNU
BSD
  • I love Free Software Day 2017

    In the Free Software society we exchange a lot of criticism. We write bug reports, tell others how they can improve the software, ask them for new features, and generally are not shy about criticising others. There is nothing wrong about that. It helps us to constantly improve. But sometimes we forget to show the hardworking people behind the software our appreciation.

  • GCC 7 To Have Better Test Coverage, Unit Testing

    Red Hat developer David Malcolm has shared the work he's been doing on improving the GCC compiler's internal testing to ensure the GNU Compiler Collection is working as anticipated and is generating correct code.

    GCC 7 has many new features while Malcom's focus recently has been improving GCC's own test suite to ensure the quality and correctness of the code being generated.

  • bsdtalk266 - The nodes take over
  • FreeBSD Ended Out 2016 With Work On Using The LLD Linker, ARM64, LXQt Porting

    FreeBSD has issued their latest quarterly report covering Q4'2016, from October to December of development highlights.

Linux Foundation News

Linux and FOSS Events: Oman's SQU and FOSDEM

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]
    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.
  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities
    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."
  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says
    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer. The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store. "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.
  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices
    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this? Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles. Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.
  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM
    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.