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Thursday, 06 Aug 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 4:44pm
Story Is the Python Community Becoming Toxic? Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 4:17pm
Story Linux 5.9: close_range(), Keem Bay, and FSGSBASE Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 4:13pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 4:07pm
Story Games: xoreos, Vulkan, Poly Bridge 2, Unrailed! and More Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 3:59pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 3:55pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 11:06am
Story Collabora Office 6.4 Brings Outstanding MS Office Interoperability, LTS Support Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 10:59am
Story An open source solution for continuous testing at scale Rianne Schestowitz 04/08/2020 - 10:47am
Story Security-Oriented Kodachi Linux 7.2 Released with One of the Best Secure Messengers Rianne Schestowitz 1 04/08/2020 - 7:18am

Open Hardware/Modding With Linux, RISC-V and Arduino

Filed under
Hardware
  • IoTSDR Linux Board Targets the Development of IoT Gateways with Standard or Custom IoT Protocols (Crowdfunding)

    Xilinx Zynq-7010/-7020 powered iotSDR board by EmbedINN enables the development of IoT gateways with support for LoRa, SigFox, WeightLess, Bluetooth, BLE, 802.15.4, ZigBee, as well as custom IoT protocols.

    The board also supports GPS, Galileo, Beidou, and GLONASS navigation systems thanks to a Maxim Integrated MAX2769 GNSS chip.

  • RISC-V Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the RISC-V Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference!

    The RISC-V ecosystem is gaining momentum at such an astounding speed that it wouldn’t be unfair to compare it to the early days of the Linux ecosystem’s growth. There are a plethora of Linux kernel features that have been added to RISC-V and many more are waiting to be reviewed in the mailing list. Some of them resulted from direct discussions during last year’s RISC-V microconference. For example, RISC-V has a standard boot process along with a well-defined supervisor binary specification (SBI) and cpu hotplug feature. KVM support is very close to being merged and just waiting for official ratification of the H extension. NoMMU support for Linux kernel has already been merged.

  • International Space Station Tracker | The MagPi 96
  • Juuke is an Arduino-powered RFID music player for the elderly

    While many of us take playing tunes for granted, whether via MP3s, CDs, or streaming services, for others — such as many that are very young or old — actually figuring out the interface can be a challenge. To make it easier for the elderly (and children) to enjoy music, Ananords and his girlfriend created the Juuke box.

    The Juuke features an RC522 RFID reader to trigger specific songs stored on an SD card via a DFPlayer Mini, using a stereo jack and external powered speakers. The device is controlled by an Arduino Uno, and includes a volume potentiometer along with two light-up buttons — red to play/pause tracks, green for random playback.

Programming: Python, Java, and Perl

Filed under
Development
  • Time spent on the moon

    This post will illustrate two things: the amount of time astronauts have spent on the moon, and how to process dates and times in Python.

    I was curious how long each Apollo mission spent on the lunar surface, so I looked up the timelines for each mission from NASA. Here’s the timeline for Apollo 11, and you can find the timelines for the other missions by making the obvious change to the URL.

  • Java Constructor Tutorial

    The constructor tool is a very important and useful method used for object-oriented programming. It is not mandatory to declare a constructor for any class, and this tool is mainly used to initialize the object of the class at the time of object creation. The constructor does not work like other normal methods. Rather, the constructor tool is called automatically when an object is declared, and it allocates the memory location for the object. This tutorial will show you how different types of user-defined constructors can be implemented and used in Java class programming.

  • Java if, if-else, if-else-if

    The use of a control flow statement is a very common requirement for solving any programming problem. It is mainly used to generate a particular output based on the particular condition. This statement makes the decision based on the Boolean value return by the statement. The declaration of the if-else-if statement is quite similar to other programming languages like C, C++, etc. The uses of different ‘if’ statements in Java are explained in this tutorial.

  • Java Array Tutorial

    The array object is used to store multiple data in Java. This tool allocates particular memory locations serially based on the array size. An array object in Java can store any one type of primitive or non-primitive data. That means that it can store a list of integers, strings, objects, etc. So, all the values of an array can be data of a particular datatype. The index value of an array starts from 0, as in other programming languages. Both single- and multi-dimensional arrays can be declared in Java. A list of data can be organized and sorted very easily by using an array. The major limitation of arrays is that the size of the array is fixed and it cannot be changed at the run-time. This tutorial will show how array objects can be declared, initialized, accesses, and modified.

  • Java for loop

    Sometimes, it requires to execute some statements repeatedly for getting any particular output to solve a problem, and this type of task can be done easily by using any type of loop. Generally, three types of loops are supported by most of the programming languages. The ‘for’ loop is one of them. This loop is very useful for doing different types of programming tasks. How ‘for’ loop can be used in Java for multiple purposes is explained in this tutorial.

  • Perl7 is a fork of values

    Before reading this, you should watch this video where Bryan Cantrill explains a value-conflict between Joyent and Node.js, I believe we have a similar problem.

  • 8 tips for running a virtual hackathon

    Hackathons are events where developers, product managers, designers, and others come together to tackle problems over a short time period. They have become increasingly popular over the last 15 years after OpenBSD ran the first hackathon in June 1999.

    These events provide several benefits—greater engagement across the community, innovation and new ideas, awareness for the organizers, and networking opportunities for participants.

    Mattermost, an open source messaging platform for DevOps teams, has also run and participated in several hackathons to engage with the open source community. So far, in 2020, we participated in a hackathon to overcome the challenges of COVID-19 and ran a hackfest to create open source chatbots for developer workflows. Both had thousands of participants and were run completely virtually.

  • 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge submissions are closed

    We want to extend our deep appreciation to everyone who answered, supported, and championed the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge. From building solutions to take on the impacts of climate change, to swiftly responding to the surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, we applaud you for your unwavering commitment to fighting back against these difficult times. This year has been unprecedented on many levels, but what we have seen from the Call for Code community is that when the chips are down, your innovation and problem-solving prowess rises up.

    As of July 31, submissions for the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge are closed, but another chapter awaits — and it needs your help. Whether you are looking to take on COVID-19, climate change, natural disasters, or other pressing social issues, your code has a vital role to play. Brush up on your cloud skills while making a real difference and get involved with Call for Code open source projects supported by The Linux Foundation. Through your contributions, you could be recognized as a community champion. Visit Call for Code on Monday, August 3, and we’ll have details for you on how you can get involved and start making an impact in these projects. I would also encourage you to continue development on your own projects and to share your progress and any help needed in the Slack channel. Your contributions can have global impact well beyond the lifecycle of a single challenge.

  • HOW TO USE MALLOC FUNCTION IN C

    Malloc is a built-in function declared in the header file . Malloc is the short name for ‘memory allocation’ and is used to dynamically allocate a single large block of contiguous memory according to the size specified. There are two types of memory allocation static and dynamic. Static memory allocation is done at compilation time, and it doesn’t change at runtime. Dynamic memory allocation is allocating memory at runtime for this; we use malloc. Now the point is where from this memory is coming, so all dynamic requirements in C are fulfilled from the heap memory.

  • How to use pipe function in C language

    A pipe is a medium for communication between processes. One process writes data to the pipe, and another process reads the data from the pipe. In this article, we will see how the pipe() function is used to implement the concept using C language.

  • What every developer should know about consistency

    But we don’t live an ideal world - your request needs to reach the data store, which then needs to process the request and finally send back a response to you. All these actions take time and are not instantaneous: [...]

KDE Developers on KDE Itinerary, GSoC and Air Conditioner Hacking

Filed under
KDE

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

  • Setting Up Zimbra Collaboration Suite (ZCS) on RHEL/CentOS 7/8
  • Using Reddit from the console in 2020
  •  

  • Anonsurf

    Prying eyes have always threatened user privacy. Whether it is your average computer user or a highly skilled IT professional, no one wants their activities to be viewed and logged. Incognito browsing is a popular user preference. Solutions like Tor have helped with that a lot, but what if you want all your traffic going through a Tor tunnel?
    ParrotSec has provided the answer to the question in the form of a program called Anonsurf – “Dance like no one’s watching.”

    Anonsurf is a script made by the development team at ParrotSec, which included Lorenzo Faletra (@palinuro), Lisetta Ferrero (@sheireen) and Francesco Bonanno (@mibofra), and that is maintained by Nong Hoang Tu (@dmknght). This script was made to provide users with system-wide anonymization. In simpler words, anything you do while you have Anonsurf started on your system would be nearly untraceable. Anonsurf not only routes all your traffic through Tor, but it also lets you start i2p services and clear any traces left on the user disk. Anonsurf also kills away all dangerous applications by virtue of the Pandora bomb, so you do not need to worry about having a Tor browser and other scripts running to hide your system. The best part is that all this is contained in a simple start/stop function.

    Anonsurf uses Tor IPTables for the configuration of IP packet filter rules. While Tor provides a browser solution, Anonsurf is capable of much more.

    If the above paragraphs do not make sense to you yet, do not panic. It is very easy to use Anonsurf and we are here to guide you through to anonymity.

  • Building a Graylog server to run on an Amazon Lightsail instance
  • Lemonbar: STOP THINKING And Just Configure It With Succade
  • LG 29″ UltraWide | Monitor Upgrade and Configuration on Linux

GNOME and GTK: Devs, Themes and Declaration of Digital Autonomy

Filed under
GNOME

            

  • Diego Escalante Urrelo: A minimal jhbuild GNOME session in Debian

    I recently setup a GNOME development environment (after about seven years!). That meant starting from scratch since my old notes and scripts were completely useless.

    My goal for this setup was once again to have the bare minimum jhbuild modules on top of a solid base system provided by my distro. The Linux desktop stack has changed a bit, specially around activation, dbus, and systemd, so I was a bit lost on how to do things properly.

  •         

  • Molly de Blanc: busy busy

    I’ve been working with Karen Sandler over the past few months on the first draft of the Declaration of Digital Autonomy. Feedback welcome, please be constructive. It’s a pretty big deal for me, and feels like the culmination of a lifetime of experiences and the start of something new.

    We talked about it at GUADEC and HOPE. We don’t have any other talks scheduled yet, but are available for events, meetups, dinner parties, and b’nai mitzvahs.

  •        

  • Linux themes update – August 2020

    Customization plays a big part when it comes to Linux. Users around the world are using different kind of distribution and most of them really like to make their desktop look just amazing. In this monthly article, you will get to know about the new trending themes for Linux.

    So without further let’s get down to the business.

    Note: All the themes are GTK based so they shall apply on most of the desktop environments.

  •        

  • libhandy: project update

    Since the last update, we have progressed a lot in achieving a significant milestone; that is handling multiple rows in our widget. For me working through this implementation involved understanding the GtkGrid implementation, then developing an idea around it to add the adaptive factor to our brand new widget.

    One issue that has been lingering for a while was to find a way for accepting column weights through XML layouts.

    The issue persists in the latest code, but for the time being, this is our workaround: currently, we have a weight property for every child widget (which defaults to 0) and then the column’s weight is derived from the widgets belonging to that column.
    So if widgets belonging to the same column have different weights defined in XML (or assigned programmatically), its unpredictable what weight the column will end up having. So, it is to be taken care that every widget belonging to the same column don’t have different weights.

    That does not sound good, but thankfully, Adrien recently came up with a suggestion of keeping a property which accepts comma-separated values. We will be implementing this in the coming days. This will remove the unpredictable weight issue with our current approach (Yay!).

Kernel: Linux 5.9, Linux Plumbers Conference and Microsoftication

Filed under
Linux

  • Linux 5.9 Adding New Knob To Control Default Boost Value For Real-Time Workloads

    Primarily driven currently by Arm big.LITTLE use-cases like high-end smartphones where you may be running on battery and not want to boost the CPU performance too high for real-time (RT) tasks, Linux 5.9 is adding new capabilities around setting the default boost value.

    Contributed by Arm, Linux 5.9's sched/uclamp code is setting the capability to control the RT default boost value. This can be used for lowering the default boost value to in turn conserve energy consumption of real-time tasks. It's assumed that vendors will tune this value for the best performance/power for RT tasks depending upon the device and potentially differ depending upon the AC/battery power source.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: You, Me, and IoT Two Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the You, Me, and IoT Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference!

    As everyday devices start to become more connected to the internet, the infrastructure around it constantly needs to be developed. The Internet of Things (IoT) in the Linux ecosystem is looking brighter every day. The
    development rate of the Zephyr RTOS in particular is accelerating dramatically and we are now up to 2 commits per hour[1]! LoRa WAN made it into Zephyr release 2.2 as well.

  • Linux's exFAT File-System Driver Can Now "FSCK" As Fast As Windows

    Samsung engineers responsible for the modern exFAT file-system driver for Linux have updated the adjoining "exfatprogs" user-space programs around this file-system. Notable to exfatprogs-1.0.4 is much faster "fsck" file-system checking support.

    Namjae Jeon of Samsung announced the 1.0.4 exfatprogs release today and noted that "the performance of fsck have been much improved". This now leads to the FSCK performance being close to Windows' own FSCK performance and much better than the former exfat-fuse FSCK checking. Both exfatprogs and the Windows fsck take around 11 seconds while the former exfat-fuse FSCK implementation takes more than one minute to complete in tests on microSDXC storage.

Games: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, FAudio and Unigine Engine Release

Filed under
Gaming
  • CS:GO on Linux is actually not launching Trusted Mode by default - quick fix

    Looks like Valve did a bit of a woopsie. With the recent updates to Counter-Strike: Global Offensive they implemented a new anti-cheat tool with Trusted Mode but it appears at some point they forgot to enable it.

    What is Trusted Mode? It's supposed to be the new default for all CS:GO players, which prevents a bunch of outside applications from interfering with it and hopefully prevent more cheating. It's only a small barrier by itself, just another in the list of ways Valve are trying to clean up CS:GO online play.

  • FNA FAudio 20.08 Released With WMA Decoding Powered By GStreamer

    Linux game porter Ethan Lee who also develops FNA-XNA today released FAudio 20.08 as the open-source XAudio re-implementation.

    FAudio as the XAudio(2)/X3DAudio/XAPO/XACT3 open-source re-implementation under the FNA-XNA project continues getting in better shape in helping bring Windows games built off the XNA run-time running on Linux and similar platforms. With FAudio 20.08 one of the big changes is the FFmpeg back-end has been replaced by GStreamer for handling the WMA audio decoding.

  • The Beautiful + Linux-Friendly Unigine 2.12 Engine Released

    The Unigine Engine appears to be having great success in the engineering and simulation space more so than for the competitive game engine space, but in any case Unigine 2.12 is now out with this visually stunning engine delivering even more life-like visuals while continuing to be Linux-friendly.

    Unigine 2.12 rolls out with improvements to its particle system, a roughly two fold physics performance optimization, cloud and atmosphere improvements, new content add-ons, animation improvements, specular anti-aliasing, and numerous other engine improvements.

  • UNIGINE 2.12: Faster Physics, Better Clouds, Earthworks Demo, Advanced Particle Systems

    Now you’ve got full control over various particles parameters, enabling you to control their values during the whole lifetime of your particles. The changes affected the Particle System object (ObjectParticles) itself along with the particles_base material. We’ve added a new visual Curve Editor to simplify adjustment of parameter’s behavior making the process more intuitive and flexible.

Graphics: MoltenVK, Wayland-Utils 1.0 and XFB

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • MoltenVK Update Brings Vulkan To Apple's tvOS

    The MoltenVK update against the Vulkan SDK 1.2.148 now allows tvOS platform support alongside iOS and macOS. Apple's tvOS is the operating system found on the Apple TV hardware over the past decade. Apple tvOS is in turn derived from iOS. For the past several years, tvOS has offered App Store integration for third-party software while now these apps can decide to make use of Vulkan.

  • wayland-utils 1.0.0

    This is first release of wayland-utils which only contains (for now)
    wayland-info, a utility for displaying information about the Wayland
    protocols supported by a Wayland compositor.

    wayland-info is basically a standalone version of weston-info as found
    in weston repository.

  • Wayland-Utils 1.0 Relased As New Utility Package For Wayland Tools

    In addition to the Weston 9.0 Alpha compositor, this week also brought Wayland-Utils 1.0 as the inaugural release for this collection of Wayland utilities/tools.

    Wayland-Utils was started in July after the wayland-info tool was spun out of Weston code for offering a generic Wayland tool. The wayland-info program prints various Wayland protocol details and other compositor-agnostic information. Previously there was the weston-info utility that has now been superseded by the more generic wayland-info tool and also as a standalone package separate from Weston.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Primitive Pain

    I’ve talked in the past about XFB, and I’ve talked about queries, but I’ve never spent much time talking about XFB queries.

    That’s going to change.

    XFB is not great, and queries aren’t something I’m too fond of at this point after rewriting the handling so many times, but it was only the other day, while handling streams for XFB3/ARB_gpu_shader5 (humblebrag) that I realized I had been in the infant area of the playground until this moment.

This week in KDE: better handling for grouped tasks in the Task Manager

Filed under
KDE

This week we got a big improvement in how the Task Manager handles grouped tasks: by default, it activates the last-used task and then cycles through other tasks if you continue to click on it. There are also some more welcome improvements for the “Get New [Thing]” system, as well as a nice smallering of miscellany. Take a look:

New Features

MP4 video files now show the embedded cover art image when it’s available and previews are enabled (Heiko Schaefer, Dolphin 20.12.0)

The Task Manager now defaults to cycling through child tasks when clicking on a grouped task, and always display the most-recently-used one when switching to a task from an app that’s different from the current one. All of this may sound awfully complicated, but hopefully it’s exactly what you wanted it to do all along.

Read more

Also: KDE Developers End July With More Improvements For Plasma 5.20

BEE free OS 20.04(2020-08-01) Update log

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux kernel 5.4.0-42-generic
Add speedtest for commandline
Add mpg123, sometimes it is needed for the TTS project
WPS Office 2019 For Linux(11.1.0.9615)
Speed up droidcam
Lightworks 2020.1(122068)
Remove.bg (1.3.0-1)

Read more

Programming With Python

Filed under
Development

  • Top 10 Python Libraries that Every Data Scientist Must Know

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that has replaced many programming languages in the industry. It is one of the most loved programming languages that data science professionals use more because it is an ocean of libraries.

    Python is known as the beginner’s level programming language because of its simplicity and easiness, its programming syntax is simple to learn and is of high level compared to C, Java, and C++.

    For more accurate algorithms and coding, Analytics Insight compiles the top 10 Python libraries, here is the list-

  • Why Python is not the programming language of the future -- a response

    See https://towardsdatascience.com/why-python-is-not-the-programming-language-of-the-future-30ddc5339b66.

    This is an interesting article with some important points. And. It has some points that I disagree with.

    Speed. This is a narrow perspective. numpy and pandas are fast, dask is fast. A great many Python ecosystem packages are fast. This complaint seems to be unsupported by evidence.

    Dynamic Scoping Rules. This actually isn't the problem. The problem is something about not being able to change containing scopes. First, I'm not sure changing nesting scopes is of any value at all. Second, the complaint ignores the global and nonlocal statements. The vague "leads to a lot of confusion" seems unsupported by any evidence.

    Lambdas. The distinction between expressions and statements isn't really a distinction in Python in general, only in the bodies of lambdas. I'm not sure what the real problem is, since a lambda with statements seems like a syntactic nightmare better solved with an ordinary, named function.

    Whitespace. Sigh. I've worked with many people who get the whitespace right but the {}'s wrong in C++. The code looks great but doesn't work. Python gets it right. The code looks great and works.

  • How to Extract Sentences from Text Using the NLTK Python Module

    The Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK) is a language and text processing module for Python. NLTK can analyze, process, and tokenize text available in many different languages using its built-in library of corpora and large pool of lexical data. Python is one of the most popular programming languages used in data science and language processing, mainly due to the versatility of the language and the availability of useful modules like NLTK. This article will explain how to extract sentences from text paragraphs using NLTK. The code in this guide has been tested with Python 3.8.2 and NLTK 3.4.5 on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

  • I Wrote an Online Escape Game

    I’m an escape room enthusiast, some may say addict, and for the past few months I’ve been missing it. A friend of mine, a true addict with over 500 rooms to his name, started organizing online competitions. After playing a few of the online games, I thought, “I want to build my own.”

    So for that past couple of months I’ve been writing an online escape game — which you could say is a web puzzle game, but with the exciting flare of escape! It’s suitably called “Prototype”. I assumed that name would let me get away with some rough edges. This will be an evolving project, but the first installment is a success.

    I’m proud of my game. I want to tell you how I made it.

  • Newsletter August 2020

    This month we kept refining existing features to improve the user experience, smooth workflows and empower users.

  • Python ASGI CLI
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxxviii) stackoverflow python report
  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 023, Day 24 - Tiny Utility to do comparative DNS Lookups

Wine 5.14

Filed under
Software

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.14 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - More restructuration of the console support.
      - Initial version of the Webdings font.
      - Beginnings of PE conversion of the MSVCRT libraries.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
    
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
    
    
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.14.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.14.tar.xz
    
    
    
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
    
    
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    
    
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    
    
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    
    
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.14 Brings Initial Version Of The Webdings Font

    Wine 5.14 debuted late on Friday night as the newest bi-weekly development release with being less than a half-year to go now until the debut of Wine 6.0 stable. 

  • Quench that weekend thirst with the release of Wine 5.14

    The Wine team today announced the released of Wine 5.14, the next development release on the long road to Wine 6.0.

    If you're curious on what Wine is: it's the constantly improving compatibility layer that allows the running of Windows-only applications and games on Linux and other operating systems. It's one of the driving forces behind Steam Play Proton. Helping you to get whatever you need done on Linux, or perhaps so you don't have to give up that favourite game.

DistroTest – Test Linux And Unix Operating Systems Online For Free

Filed under
GNU
Linux

DistroTest is a web service that allows you to test Linux and Unix operating systems online for free, without having to install them locally. You can try 300+ Linux and Unix operating systems online without having to install them locally. Just visit the website, choose the Linux/Unix distro of your choice and run it!

The creators of DistroTest have hosted this web service on Debian using Qemu. There is no restrictions to use the distros listed here. You can use all functions of the system as the way you do in your local system.

Read more

KDE Plasma Desktop review: I'm still not switching from GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
Reviews

I have to confess: I don't give KDE a fair shake. It's not because I don't believe it to be a strong take on the Linux desktop, it's just that I prefer a much more minimal desktop. Also, I was never a big fan of the old taskbar/start menu/system tray combo. I leaned more toward the GNOME way of thinking and doing things.

Recently, a reader called me out on my lack of KDE coverage, so I thought it was time to offer up my take on where KDE Plasma stands, and who might be best suited to use this open source desktop. Comparing Plasma to my usual GNOME desktop is really quite challenging, given these two desktops are night and day. It's like comparing the works of Clive Barker to that of William Gibson--they're both incredibly good at what they do, they're using the same tools to tell stories, but in very different genres.

Read more

Updated Debian 10: 10.5 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the fifth update of its stable distribution Debian 10 (codename "buster"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

This point release also addresses Debian Security Advisory: DSA-4735-1 grub2 -- security update which covers multiple CVE issues regarding the GRUB2 UEFI SecureBoot 'BootHole' vulnerability.

Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 10 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "buster" media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won't have to update many packages, and most such updates are included in the point release.

New installation images will be available soon at the regular locations.

Read more

Also: Debian GNU/Linux 10.5 “Buster” Released with BootHole Patches, 62 Security Updates

Debian 10.5 Released To Address The GRUB2 BootHole Vulnerability, Other Security Fixes

Debian 10.5 Buster point release 20200801 - all of the fixes

Debian 10.5 media testing process started 202008011145 - post 1 of several.

Debian 10.5 media testing - continuing quite happily - post 2 of several

23 Best Free Linux Window Managers

Filed under
Linux

A window manager is software that manages the windows that applications bring up. For example, when you start an application, there will be a window manager running in the background, responsible for the placement and appearance of windows.

It is important not to confuse a window manager with a desktop environment. A desktop environment typically consists of icons, windows, toolbars, folders, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. They provide a collection of libraries and applications made to operate cohesively together. A desktop environment contains its own window manager.

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Linux Weekly Roundup: Firefox, Telegram, Kodi, BootHole Security Issue and More

Filed under
News

Here’s a recap for the week in the form of weekly roundup, curated for you from the Linux and opensource world on application updates, new releases, distribution updates, major news, and upcoming trends.
Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Plumbers Conference and Kernel Developments in METRICFS, FS-Cache, HWMON

  • Application Ecosystem Microconference Accepted into 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Application Ecosystem Microconference has been accepted into the 2020 Linux Plumbers Conference! The Linux kernel is the foundation of the Linux systems, but it is not much use without applications that run on top of it. The application experience relies on the kernel for performance, stability and responsiveness. Plumbers is the perfect venue to have the kernel and app ecosystems under one roof to discuss and learn together and make a better application experience on the Linux platform.

  • Google Opens Patches For "METRICFS" That They Have Used Since 2012 For Telemetry Data

    The METRICFS file-system has been in use internally at Google since 2012 for exporting system statistics to their telemetry systems with around 200 statistics being exported per machine. They are now posting the METRICFS patches as open-source for review and possible upstreaming. A "request for comments" on METRICFS was sent out today on the Linux kernel mailing list. Their motives for now finally publishing these patches is as a result of the recent Statsfs proposal by a Red Hat engineer for a RAM-based file-system for exposing kernel statistics to user-space. METRICFS has a similar aim to Statsfs.

  • FS-Cache Rewritten But Even Its Developers Are Hesitant About Landing It For Linux 5.9

    FS-Cache provides the Linux kernel with a general purpose cache for network file-systems like NFS and AFS but also other special use-cases like ISO9660 file-systems. FS-Cache has been rewritten for better performance and reliability, among other benefits, and while it has been sent in as a pull request for Linux 5.9 even its own developers provide some caution over landing it this cycle. FS-Cache has seen work to "massively overhaul" it with a variety of improvements. The new and improved FS-Cache will now use async direct I/O in place of snooping for updated pages that in turn means less virtual memory overhead. The new FS-Cache implementation has simpler object management, changes to object invalidation, and a variety of other work.

  • Corsair Commander Pro Driver Sent In To Linux 5.9

    The hardware monitoring (HWMON) subsystem has a new driver that is likely to excite some enthusiasts wanting greater control over thermal monitoring and fan control for their systems. The previously covered Corsair Commander Pro Linux driver is now coming with Linux 5.9. The Commander Pro offers six 4-pin fan ports with PWM controls, two RGB LED channels, and four thermal sensors. An interested user/developer created this Linux driver without the support from Corsair. The thermal and fan control support is in place with this new HWMON driver while the RGB lighting controls are available from OpenRGB.

Graphics: Mesa 20.1.5, Intel and AMD

  • mesa 20.1.5
    Hi all,
    
    I'd like to announce Mesa 20.1.5, the fifth bugfix release for the 20.1 branch.
    
    The next bugfix release is planned for 2 weeks from now, on 2020-08-19.
    
    Cheers,
    Eric
    
    
  • Mesa 20.1.5 Released For The Latest Stable Open-Source Vulkan / OpenGL Drivers

    Mesa 20.1.5 provides the latest stable open-source Vulkan/OpenGL graphics drivers for the Linux desktop as the newest bi-weekly milestone. Mesa 20.2 remains under development as this quarter's feature release due out in about one month's time. Mesa 20.2 is running behind schedule as it should have been branched around the end of July but has yet to happen. In any case, more Mesa 20.2 feature work continues to land and more than likely will ship sometime in September. But until that occurs, Mesa 20.1 is the latest stable series.

  • Intel Workaround For Graphics Driver Regression: "The Platform Problem Going Crazy"

    Sent out over the weekend was a patch series for the Intel Linux kernel graphics driver entitled "Time, where did it go?" This set of 42 patches aims to provide incremental improvements to the driver to offset a performance regression in Linux 5.7 that Intel hasn't been able to track down. This increased complication of the driver to offset the regression is now under the microscope. The set of 42 patches by longtime Intel open-source developer Chris Wilson provides incremental improvements to reduce the execution latency. He was upfront that the intent of these improvements are to "basically offsets the small regressions incurred when compared to [Linux kernel] 5.7."

  • RadeonSI Resorts To Disabling SDMA For GFX9/Vega Due To APU Issues

    AMD's RadeonSI Gallium3D driver has resorted to disabling SDMA (System DMA) async DMA engine support for all GFX9/Vega hardware due to issues plaguing some APUs. While SDMA has the potential of helping performance, GFX9 (Vega) is now seeing the support disabled due to bugs seeming to only affect APUs. Though it's not entirely surprising as the open-source AMD Radeon Linux driver also is not enabling SDMA at this point for GFX8 (Polaris) or GFX10 (Navi) hardware either. Opened three months ago was the merge request for disabling SDMA on GFX9 and to back-port it to the stable series as well. Longtime AMD open-source developer Marek Olsak noted, "This is somewhat a radical step. All opinions welcome."

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, CrowPi and Linux Headlines

           
  • Destination Linux 185: Let’s Fix Linux Tech Support

    On this week’s episode of Destination Linux, we’re transitioning from the topic of Bug Reporting last week to Tech Support in Linux this week. We’re going to check in on Wayland’s progress with Plasma’s new release, we have an sandbox MMO for gaming, and our popular tips/tricks and software picks. All of this and so much more, coming up right now on Destination Linux.

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  • FLOSS Weekly 590: Rensselaer Center for Open Software - A Community of Open Source Developers

    RCOS is a group of RPI students who work on open-source projects. The goal of RCOS is to empower students to develop open-source solutions to real-world problems. They have created 300+ open source projects over the years. Doc Searls and Simon Phipps talk with Wes Turner, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and the Director of the Rensselaer Center for Open Source. They discuss teaching open source and the hardships that come along with that, especially with e-learning. They also discuss what the future could look like if we could have more open-source programs like RCOS in other universities.

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  • The Best Raspberry Pi Laptop Kit | CrowPi 2 Review

    The Best Raspberry Pi Laptop Kit | CrowPi 2 Review of the kit, usage, and examples. 

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  • 2020-08-05 | Linux Headlines

    LibreOffice 7 dodges its rebranding controversy, the Pinta bitmap editor sees its first new version in 5 years, Red Hat accommodates certification seekers with new pandemic-friendly rules, and ownCloud 10.5 brings background sync changes to the platform.

Gaming on Linux in 2020: Way Better Than You Think

Linux has always been seen as a rather rigid operating system for gaming. Many games used to be unavailable on Linux, and the ones that you could play used to have all sorts of bugs. However, the situation’s not the same anymore with Ubuntu 20.04. The OS is way better for gaming than you may think. In certain situations, games even run better on Linux than on Windows. This is quite impressive so let’s see what lead to Linux’s improvements. Read more Also: Narrative-driven adventure Impostor Factory has new teaser trailer