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Tuesday, 28 Apr 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:23am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:22am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:22am
Story The Turing Phone Is Super Durable and Ultra Secure Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:18am
Story GNU/Linux Share of Global Page-Views Reaches New High Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:50am
Story Linux Kernel 4.0 Update Kit Now Available for Black Lab Linux 6.5, Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:46am
Story Storage VP: Red Hat Gluster, Ceph see faster start than Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:46am
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5 Test 3 Out Now with Linux 3.14.38 LTS, Based on Debian Wheezy Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:44am
Story OpenMandriva 3 Alpha, Debian LTS Recruitment, & Gentoo Git Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:42am
Story Debian Release Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 6:56am

Bootable Image for Tizen on Raspberry PI 2 released

Filed under
Linux

Following on from yesterdays news that you can get Tizen running on Raspberry PI 2, today the good guys at the Samsung Open Source Group have made available a bootable Tizen image Tizen for the Raspberry Pi 2, ready for you to download and flash a Micro SD Card with.

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Red Hat explains its choice of scale-out storage hats

Filed under
Red Hat

Which Red Hat scale-out storage product should you choose: Ceph or Gluster?

Red Hat has brought Ceph – acquired with InkTank in May last year – up to its engineering standards and branded it Red Hat Ceph Storage, and is now touting it alongside its Red Hat Gluster Storage.

Both Ceph and Gluster are open source, scale-out, software-defined storage products running on commodity hardware. Red Hat suggests Ceph is better for OpenStack and Gluster for Big Data analytics, but both could do either job.

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OpenBSD on Digital Ocean

Filed under
BSD

For OpenBSD users, it has been pretty disappointing that Digital Ocean didn’t launch other BSDs with introduction of FreeBSD, even though the technical barrier had been removed to allow it.

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Also: EuroBSDcon 2015: Extended deadline for submissions.

My switch to OpenBSD, first impressions

Machine Dreams

Filed under
Linux

Linux++, as it is called, can’t make full use of the Machine’s power but will be compatible with most existing Linux software, so programmers can easily try it out. Those who like it will be able to step up to HP’s second new operating system, Carbon, which won’t be finished for two years or more. It will be released as open source, so anyone can inspect or modify its code, and is being designed from the ground up to unleash the full power of a computer with no division between storage and memory. By starting from scratch, Friedrich says, this operating system will remove all the complexity, caused by years of updates on top of updates, that leads to crashes and security weaknesses.

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Debian 8.0 Adds Support for ARM64, PowerPC64 Little-Endian and Intel Bay Trail Architectures

Filed under
Debian

The Debian Project, through Steve McIntyre, announced on April 23 that the Debian CD/DVD/BD team is ready for the Debian 8.0 (codename Jessie) release, urging users to test the images before the unveiling of the final release of the highly anticipated operating system on April 25, 2015.

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Red Hat introduces business resource planner for enterprises

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat has introduced a new business resource planner to help enterprises quickly and efficiently address complex scheduling and resource planning challenges.

The new business planner is a part of Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite and Red Hat JBoss BRMS and is included with a subscription to JBoss BRMS at no addional cost.

The planner is based on the open source OptaPlanner JBoss community and is also designed to increase operational adaptability in the face of rapidly changing and unpredictable business environments.

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Fedora 22 Is an Excellent Choice for Running Linux in the Cloud

Filed under
Red Hat

The Cloud Edition of the Fedora 22 Beta Linux operating system was officially unveiled on April 21, along with all of Fedora's Spins, including Fedora 22 Server, Fedora 22 Workstation (GNOME), Fedora 22 KDE Plasma 5, Fedora 22 Xfce, Fedora 22 LXDE, and Fedora 22 MATE/Compiz.

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Also: Fedora 22 Beta LXDE Screenshot Tour

Fedora 22 Beta MATE/Compiz Screenshot Tour

Intel Compute Stick now available: $149 for Windows version, $110 for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The concept of a "PC stick" -- a processor and RAM embedded into a gum-pack-sized device that can connect to your HDTV via an HDMI connection -- is nothing new, but when a company like Intel embraces the concept, a lot more people start paying attention.

That was the case at CES back in January, when Intel showed off the Compute Stick, its version of a teeny-tiny PC that includes a quad-core Atom processor and -- depending on whether you want the Windows 8.1 or Linux edition -- comes with up to 2GB of RAM and up to 32GB of onboard storage. All of this fits onto something with dimensions of just 4.1x1.5x0.5 inches.

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Why Ubuntu Keeps the Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

By now, we might expect that in the name of profitability, Ubuntu would be making plans to drop its desktop to concentrate solely on servers and the cloud, where money is undoubtedly easier to make. This is the path forged by Red Hat and SUSE, both of which long ago quit developing mainstream desktop editions in favor of “community developed” distros, which are mainly testing grounds for their respective enterprise stacks. Ubuntu doesn’t seem to be interested in going that route — not yet, anyway.

Why? Because the desktop fits neatly into Canonical’s plans.

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ONLYOFFICE Document Server 3.0 Release and Other News for Open Source Community

Filed under
Software

This spring seems to be rich for news! Recently we have released ONLYOFFICE Documents for iOS, updated SaaS solution to version 8.5.0 and today we have prepared 5 great news for ONLYOFFICE open source community.

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Cortex-A9 Sitara EVM gains Android KitKat BSP

Filed under
Android

Adeneo has released an Android KitKat 4.4.4 BSP for the TI Sitara AM437x EVM kit in both a free binary version and a commercial version with source code.

Adeneo Embedded’s Android 4.4.4 “KitKat” Reference Board Support Package is designed for use with the Texas Instruments AM437x EVM (TMDXEVM437X EVM). The EVM kit was announced last June with a Linux BSP when TI announced the Cortex-A9-based Sitara AM437x SoC. Adeneo tipped the BSP last December when it also announced a BSP that has since been made available based on the Cortex-A8 based Sitara AM335x. At the time, the company had few details on the AM437x BSP, however.

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GIMP's Porting To GTK3 Continues

Filed under
GNU
GNOME

The popular GIMP image editing program continues in its quest of being ported to GTK3, but it's still not clear when it will be finished and merged to mainline.

Curiosity got the best of me this morning so I decided to see the latest state of GIMP's gtk3-port branch. Unfortunately I wasn't able to get it built quickly as after building the latest BABL and then GEGL dependencies, the newest GEGL Git code ran into problems building on my system. But in looking over the gtk3-port branch, a whole lot of code was pushed out in late March by Michael Natterer and others.

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Eight Ways to Use Open Source for More Effective Data Protection

Filed under
OSS

Linus's Law, named after Linux creator Linus Torvalds, postulates that open code leads to more effective bug detection because when an entire community is scouring through code, fixes come more quickly. This is often the first thing IT pros consider when installing security inside an open-source model. Through popular code-and tool-sharing sites like GitHub, the open-source community aids other organizations in securing their own code and systems, offering a list of free security tools and frameworks for malware analysis, penetration testing and other tasks. Along these same lines, a recent report from the Ponemon Institute explored how IT professionals view commercial open-source software, data protection, and the security impact of messaging and collaboration solutions on their organizations. This slide show, based on eWEEK reporting and industry insight from Olivier Thierry, chief marketing officer of Zimbra, offers eight takeaways to help your business harness the value of open source and get serious about security.

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The NHS must embrace open source to improve

Filed under
OSS

This is according to CIO at Bolton NHS Foundation Trust Rachel Dunscombe, who we recently caught up with to learn more about the transformation facing the UK healthcare system.

Dunscombe told us that she is a strong supporter of open source in the NHS because it removes many of the risks presented by using proprietary products.

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Is OpenOffice Dying?

Filed under
LibO
OOo

In September 2014, rumors were flying that Apache OpenOffice was floundering and might soon merge with LibreOffice. The rumors were denied, but revived in March 2015 when Jonathan Corbett used development activity statistics to show that OpenOffice was seriously short of developers, and had corporate support only from IBM. Now, OpenOffice's most recent report to the Apache Foundation appears to reinforce these previous reports, and then some.

To be fair, the report is listed as "a working copy and not to be quoted." However, I am discussing it anyway for two reasons. First, much of the report was mentioned in earlier reports, which suggests that its information is accurate. Second, when I contacted Jan Iversen, the new OpenOffice Chair, three weeks ago, he gave the same warning even more strongly. Since then the contents has gone through at least one more draft, but with little change of content, which makes me suspect that the excuse is an effort to delay discussion of the content. If I am mistaken, the fact will eventually become obvious, since the report is, after all, a public document.

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"No Reboot" Kernel Patching - And Why You Should Care

Filed under
Linux

As Linux version 4.0 was released on 15 April, one of the most discussed new features to be included in this release is "no reboot" kernel patching. With the major distros committing to support the 4.0 kernel and its features (including "no reboot" patching) at some point this year, it's a good time to take a look at what this feature actually does and what difference it will make for you.

First of all, what does it actually mean? Well, for once, this is a feature with a name that describes what it does pretty well. With versions of Linux before 4.0, when the kernel is updated via a patch, the system needs to reboot.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Google takes aim at Apple Watch with Android Wear updates

    The company on Monday announced an upgrade to its Android Wear operating system for smart watches. Some features seem to take direct aim at the Apple Watch, including Wi-Fi support, a watch face that always shows the time, and doodles for messaging.

  • Sony’s REAL flagship could land next month

    Poor old Sony – after unveiling the Xperia Z4 earlier today, the company has faced a backlash across social media – and from myself – about how the Xperia Z4 isn’t really an upgrade, it’s just the same device with a couple of tweaks to the specifications. Except, all might not be as it seems with a new report suggesting that we’ll see Sony announce a real global flagship towards the end of next month.

  • Motorola begins testing Android 5.1 Lollipop for first-gen Moto X

    The original Motorola Moto X, released in 2013, has been in disadvantage since the official Lollipop release. Due to the dated Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset the Android updates need further tweaking before their rollout and first-gen Moto X was always the last of the Moto lineup on the update queue.

  • 10 Things to Do Before the Nexus Android 5.1.1 Update

    A Nexus Android 5.1.1 Lollipop update is confirmed and an Android 5.1.1 release could take place at any time. With that in mind, we want to take a look at some things we think Nexus users should do ahead of Google’s latest Android 5.1.1 release. These tips are geared towards non-power users and those that are thinking about installing the Android 5.0 Lollipop update for the first time.

  • The LG G Watch doesn’t have WiFi, all other Android Wear smartwaches will get WiFi support

    Yesterday, Google announced that Android Wear smartwatches would be getting WiFi support in the next coming weeks, bringing most Android Wear devices in line with the upcoming Apple Watch. Having a WiFi connected Android wearable is definitely a highly sought after feature, even if you still need to have your phone powered on and connected to the Internet in one way or another for full watch functionality. The question remains, does every Android Wear smartwatch support WiFi? Sadly, no.

  • Clean Up Your Messy Android and iPhone Contacts Without Going Mad
  • Adobe updates Lightroom with facial recognition, GPU enhancements, & new Android features
  • Good Technology expands Android security options

    Mobile security provider Good Technology on Tuesday released a set of security options that puts hardware-backed security capabilities into all Good-secured Android apps.

  • Google engineers on Android ecosystem facts and myths

    Ludwig decried a number of myths surrounding the definitions of malware and spyware in general. Among these, some of the assumptions floating around include the spread of malware is always increasing, most devices aren't protected, and all malware can compromise them.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Sourcegraph: A free code search tool for open source developers

Filed under
OSS

A goldmine of open source code is available to programmers, but choosing the right library and understanding how to use it can be tricky. Sourcegraph has created a search engine and code browser to help developers find better code and build software faster.

Sourcegraph is a code search engine and browsing tool that semantically indexes all the open source code available on the web. You can search for code by repository, package, or function and click on fully linked code to read the docs, jump to definitions, and instantly find usage examples. And you can do all of this in your web browser, without having to configure any editor plugin.

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