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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 8:05pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 6:39pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 6:37pm
Story GNU Gimp Development Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 6:36pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 6:36pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 6:29pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 6:28pm
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 4:54pm
Story Linux and Graphics Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 4:53pm
Story Zorin OS 12 "Core" Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 4:39pm

Why I switched from OS X to GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

After I was done with my studies at the university I wanted to work for some company which worked with Open Source, I started at Pelagicore, where I still work. There we are creating custom Linux distributions for car manufacturers, we do UI work, we write Linux drivers, Linux middleware and so on. Because we work with Linux it is much more convinient to run Linux nativelly for developement too. At Pelagicore (almosc) all developers work on Linux desktops and laptops, I felt that I fit right in with my ThinkPad. And this was also why I used my iMac less and less, everybody around me was using Linux, it became cumbersome to do the overhead to get stuff running on the iMac which I already had running at work and on my laptop on Linux.

I started with Ubuntu, but quite fast switched to Debian testing with Gnome 3 because I learned about how Canonical treats everyone, their users (the [Amazon problem (http://www.zdnet.com/article/shuttleworth-defends-ubuntu-linux-integrating-amazon/) with Unity Dash search results, problems with their Intellectual Property Policy, etc.) It also helped that there was Jeremiah, who evangalizes debian day in day out at work.

In between I wanted to try out Arch Linux so I installed it on my ThinkPad, and man this was a performance boost, it felt like a new machine in comperison to Ubuntu. Nowadays I run Arch at work too. For stuff which doesn't work, like some specific version of Yocto, I wrap it into a docker container with a Ubuntu image for compatibility.

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TedPage: The Case for Ubuntu Phone

Filed under
Ubuntu

What I find most interesting thing about this discussion is that it is the original reason that Google bought Android. They were concerned that with Apple controlling the smartphone market they’d be in a position to damage Google’s ability to compete in services. They were right. But instead of opening it up to competition (a competition that certainly at the time and even today they’re likely to win) they decided to lock down Android with their own services. So now we see in places like China where Google services are limited there is no way for Android to win, only forks that use a different set of integrations. One has to wonder if Ubuntu Phone existed earlier whether Google would have bought Android, while Ubuntu Phone competes with Android it doesn’t pose any threat to Google’s core businesses.

It is always a failure to try and convince people to change their patterns and devices just for the sake of change. Early adopters are people who enjoy that, but not the majority of people. This means that we need to be an order of magnitude better, which is a pretty high bar to set, but one I enjoy working towards. I think that Ubuntu Phone has the fundamental DNA to win in this race.

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MX Linux MX-16 Metamorphosis - Winds of change

Filed under
Reviews

MX Linux MX-16 Metamorphosis is a very decent distribution. It's a small product, not very well known, and probably not your first home choice when it comes to Linux. But then, despite its humble upbringing, it does offer a powerful punch. You get all the goodies out of the box, and except for some Bluetooth issues and less-than-trivial customization, the slate is spotless. Music, phones, speed, battery life, fun, all there.

Of course, the question is, can MX Linux sustain this record. If we look back, there were some rough patches, a bit of identity crisis, and the existential question of quality, the same journey that Xubuntu underwent. But then it kind of peaked and degraded some recently. Will MX Linux follow the same path? The last few years were good, with a steady, consistent improvement on all fronts. Then again, I thought Xubuntu was invincible, too.

For the time being, predicting the future remains tricky. However, here and now, MX-16 is a great choice for a lightweight desktop. Xfce has come a long way, and you get all the essentials you expect from a home system. It's all there, plus good looks, plus speed that rivals anything out there, among the best battery life numbers, great stability, and even some extra unique features like the live session save and MX Tools. A most worthy combo. All in all, 9.5/10. Warmly recommended for testing and sampling.

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Intro To Netrunner Desktop 17.01 GNU/Linux for Beginners

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This review of Netrunner Desktop 17.01 GNU/Linux is intended for end users and beginners. Netrunner is a desktop oriented operating system, ships with complete daily-usage desktop applications, and full multimedia codecs support. It means once the users install Netrunner they do not need to install anything anymore for all daily works. In this article you will find 12 points of review, download links, and some notes at the end. Enjoy it.

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Also: Devil-Linux 1.8.0-rc2 released

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • How we secure our infrastructure: a white paper

    Trust in the cloud is paramount to any business who is thinking about using it to power their critical applications, deliver new customer experiences and house their most sensitive data. Today, we're issuing a white paper by our security team that details how security is designed into our infrastructure from the ground up.

    Google Cloud’s global infrastructure provides security through the entire information processing lifecycle.This infrastructure provides secure deployment of services, secure storage of data with end-user privacy safeguards, secure communications between services, secure and private communication with customers over the internet and safe operation by administrators.

  • Google Infrastructure Security Design Overview [Ed: Google banned Windows internally]

    The content contained herein is correct as of January 2017, and represents the status quo as of the time it was written. Google’s security policies and systems may change going forward, as we continually improve protection for our customers.

  • Microsoft Says Windows 7 Has Outdated Security, Wants You to Move to Windows 10 [Ed: all versions are insecure BY DESIGN]

    Windows 10 is now running on more than 20 percent of the world’s desktop computers, and yet, Microsoft’s bigger challenge isn’t necessarily to boost the market share of its latest operating system, but to convince those on Windows 7 to upgrade.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 Officially Released, Includes over 85 Security Updates

    If you're using Debian Stable (a.k.a. Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie"), it's time to update it now. Why? Because Debian Project launched a new release, Debian GNU/Linux 8.7, which includes over 170 bug fixes and security updates.

  • CVS: cvs.openbsd.org: src

    Disable and lock Silicon Debug feature on modern Intel CPUs

SUSE and Microsoft E.E.E.

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/02

    I hope you all ended up well fed and healthy in the new year. For the last few weeks we have seen quite a slow pace for Tumbleweed, just as pre-announced in my last review of the year 2016. We can surely expect an increased pace again as people from all around the world resume their regular life rhythms. For completeness sake I will cover in this weeks’ review not only this week, but also the few snapshots since my last review. That means, we cover 8 snapshots: from 2016: 1216, 1217, 1219, 1222 and 1226 and from 2017: 0104, 0109 and 0110. Sadly, 0111 and 0112 ran into some issues on openQA – but the issues are to most parts in the testing framework, not the product (from what we know). But not being able to fully confirm it, I did not feel comfortable releasing them into the wild onto you. After all, I know some of you are still having issues with the kernel 4.9 series (but good new on that part is on the horizon). 0112 might still cut it, if we solve the openQA issues in time.

  • Forget Ubuntu, now OpenSuse Linux comes to Windows 10

    If you have been following Techworm, you will know that you can run Ubuntu Apps on Windows using Bash. Microsoft brought the fun and power of Linux to Windows 10 with Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). This allowed the Windows 10 users to run Bash on Ubuntu on Windows 10 and enjoy Ubuntu Apps without having to install the Ubuntu distro separately.

  • You can now install SUSE Linux distribution inside WSL on Windows 10
  • It's Now Possible to Use openSUSE Inside Windows 10, Here's How to Install It
  • Microsoft celebrates ChakraCore's first anniversary with an update on the road to parity on Linux [Ed: Another example of Microsoft hijacking projects' (e.g. GNU/Linux projects') names]

Top 10 Linux Server Distributions of 2017

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

You know that Linux is a hot data center server. You know it can save you money in licensing and maintenance costs. But that still leaves the question of what your best options are for Linux as a server operating system.

We've researched, crunched the numbers and put dozens of Linux distros through their paces to compile our latest list of the top ten Linux server distributions (aka "Linux server distros") — some of which you may not be aware.

The following characteristics, in no particular order, qualified a Linux server distro for inclusion in this list: ease of installation and use, cost, available commercial support and data center reliability.

Without further ado, here are the top 10 Linux server operating systems for 2017.

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Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Hide Complex Passwords in Plain Sight and Give Your Brain a Break

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

As far as people are concerned, there are essentially two types of passwords: the ones we can remember and the ones that are too complex for us to recall. We've learned the latter type is more secure, but it requires us to store impossible-to-memorize-password lists, creating a whole new set of problems. There are some clever tricks to help our brains out a bit, but for most of us the limit of our memory is regrettable. This tip offers a way to pull passwords from unexpected places using the Linux terminal.

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(via DMT/Linux Blog)

Updated Debian 8: 8.7 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the seventh update of its stable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This update mainly adds corrections for security problems to the stable release, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories were already published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that this update does not constitute a new version of Debian 8 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "jessie" CDs or DVDs but only to update via an up-to-date Debian mirror after an installation, to cause any out of date packages to be updated.

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Also: Debian 8.7 Jessie Released

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • A first Look at the Samsung Chromebook Plus

    Based on this video, it appears as if this Chromebook from Samsung would be a great machine with GNU/Linux installed on it.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.41 LTS Update Comes With Improved Radeon, Nouveau And Power PC

    Greg Kroah-Hartman, the Linux kernel maintainer for the stable branch gives us the impression that he doesn’t need any sleeps whatsoever as he is delivering update after updates at a timely interval. The latest update is the Linux 4.4.41 kernel and has brought Linux OS users a wide array of interesting features.

  • Kaby Lake HD Graphics 630 Appear To Be Coming Up Short On Linux

    One would think the graphics of a Core i5 7600K "Kaby Lake" processor would be faster than the Core i5 6600K "Skylake" or even a Core i5 6500, but that's not always the case with the current state of the Linux driver support for the newest-generation Intel hardware.

  • New Benchmark Test Profiles This Weekend: GIMP, Memcached, JPEG Turbo, More OpenCL
  • Discord chat and VOIP on Linux, game streaming on any device, and more

    In this open gaming roundup, we take a look at Discord, a popular chat and VOIP client among gamers which is now supported on Linux; a new Gaming as a Service platform LiquidSky; and more gaming news.

  • New Qt 5.8 rc snapshot for testing

    All known blockers should be fixed in these packages and we are targeting to release Qt 5.8.0 Tue 17th January if nothing really serious found during testing. So please inform me immediately if there is some new blocker in the packages.

  • Qt 5.8 Hoping To Release Next Week, Last Minute Test Builds

    Qt 5.8.0 will hopefully be released in the days ahead.

    The Qt Company has issued new Qt 5.8.0 release candidate snapshots this week for testing. The developers believe all official blocker bugs should be fixed with this release but are encouraging last minute testing. If nothing major is discovered, Qt 5.8.0 will be released next week on 17 January.

    Those wanting to test what could be the final builds of Qt 5.8 can find them via this Qt mailing list post. Since then some bugs have been pointed out, but it's not clear yet if they'll be promoted to being blocker bugs and thereby potentially delaying next week's release.

  • AryaLinux 2017 - Release Notes

    AryaLinux 2017 comes with package updates, the latest Linux kernel and updated build scripts to build system from scratch. Here are the features of this release...

  • AryaLinux 2017 is now available for public

    AryaLinux is an Indian Linux distribution which is made using Linux From Scratch guide. This distribution uses alps as package management. Few hours ago Arya team released AryaLinux 2017 in Xfce and MATE editions. There are various changes made in this release and lots of new updates are included too.

    According to official announcement, AryaLinux will be released in 64-bit only from now on. So guys if you want to test this distro then you better have newer hardware. Linux kernel is updated to 4.9. Mate is now updated to 1.17. LibroOffice is updates to 5.2.3. Simple screen recorder is returned with Qt5. Parole and Exaile are made default media and audio player respectively.

  • What Are the Numbers Saying About: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Upgraded at Vetr Inc.
  • Debian 8 kernel security update

    There are a fair number of outstanding security issues in the Linux kernel for Debian 8 "jessie", but none of them were considered serious enough to issue a security update and DSA. Instead, most of them are being fixed through the point release (8.7) which will be released this weekend. Don't forget that you need to reboot to complete a kernel upgrade.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Rust severely disappoints me

    I wanted to like Rust. I really did. I’ve been investigating it for months, from the outside, as a C replacement with stronger correctness guarantees that we could use for NTPsec.

    I finally cleared my queue enough that I could spend a week learning Rust. I was evaluating it in contrast with Go, which I learned in order to evaluate as a C replacement a couple of weeks back.

  • Oviedo university studies to increase open source

    The University of Oviedo in Asturias, one of Spain’s autonomous communities, is studying ways to increase its use of free and open source software, reports La Nueva España, a newspaper. Using free and open source software will help to avoid the use of unlicensed software, the university management is quoted as saying in December.

    The university is also looking into using free software solutions to reduce academic plagiarism.

    The newspaper notes how Asturia’s one and only university is at the bottom end of the annual ranking of universities that use free software (Ranking de Universidades en Software Libre, RuSL.

  • There's A New Port Of RISC-V For GCC

    For those following the progress of the RISC-V open-source and royalty-free processor ISA, a new port of the GNU Compiler Collection for this architecture is now available.

    Palmer Dabbelt of UC Berkeley previously mentioned a few months ago their GCC RISC-V code was held up due to university lawyers due to upstream GCC contributions requiring copyright assignment to the Free Software Foundation, which upset the university. But it seems they're past that now as Palmer announced this week the new RISC-V port for GCC.

Security Leftovers (Back Doors in WhatsApp/Facebook and Microsoft Windows)

Filed under
Security
  • The eight security backdoors that helped kill faith in security

    With the news of WhatsApp's backdoor granting Facebook and government agencies access to user messages, fears over users' privacy issues are sure to be at an all-time high for WhatsApp's 1 billion users.

    Backdoors in computing equipment are the stuff of legend. A decade ago a security expert informed me with absolute certainty that a prominent non-US networking company had designed them into its products for years as a matter of course as if nobody much cared about this fact. Long before the average citizen had heard the letters NSA, it struck me at the time as extraordinary suggestion. It was almost as if the deliberate compromise of an important piece of network equipment was a harmless novelty.

  • Reported “backdoor” in WhatsApp is in fact a feature, defenders say

    The Guardian roiled security professionals everywhere on Friday when it published an article claiming a backdoor in Facebook's WhatsApp messaging service allows attackers to intercept and read encrypted messages. It's not a backdoor—at least as that term is defined by most security experts. Most would probably agree it's not even a vulnerability. Rather, it's a limitation in what cryptography can do in an app that caters to more than 1 billion users.

    At issue is the way WhatsApp behaves when an end user's encryption key changes. By default, the app will use the new key to encrypt messages without ever informing the sender of the change. By enabling a security setting, users can configure WhatsApp to notify the sender that a recently transmitted message used a new key.

    Critics of Friday's Guardian post, and most encryption practitioners, argue such behavior is common in encryption apps and often a necessary requirement. Among other things, it lets existing WhatsApp users who buy a new phone continue an ongoing conversation thread.

  • Security flaw leaves WhatsApp messages susceptible to man-in-the-middle attacks

    FLAWS in the way that WhatsApp deals with encryption keys leaves users wide open to man-in-the-middle attacks, enabling third-parties to tap their communications.

    The flaw has been described as a "security back door" by The Guardian and privacy campaigners (not unlike the back doors that governments of various stripes have been trying to mandate on all internet communications by law), but more sobre voices have described it as a minor bug and criticised The Guardian for going OTT.

    Nor is it new. Vulnerabilities in key handling were first discovered by German computer scientist Tobias Boelter in April 2016.

    The security flaw relates to situations where encryption keys are dropped and have to be re-issued and re-sent. In certain circumstances, a third-party could exploit the bug to persuade the app to resend messages because the authenticity of re-issued keys is not verified in WhatsApp by default.

  • There's No Security Backdoor in WhatsApp, Despite Reports

    This morning, the Guardian published a story with an alarming headline: “WhatsApp backdoor allows snooping on encrypted messages.” If true, this would have massive implications for the security and privacy of WhatsApp’s one-billion-plus users. Fortunately, there’s no backdoor in WhatsApp, and according to Alec Muffett, an experienced security researcher who spoke to Gizmodo, the Guardian’s story is “major league fuckwittage.”

  • WhatsApp vulnerability allows snooping on encrypted messages

    A security vulnerability that can be used to allow Facebook and others to intercept and read encrypted messages has been found within its WhatsApp messaging service.

    Facebook claims that no one can intercept WhatsApp messages, not even the company and its staff, ensuring privacy for its billion-plus users. But new research shows that the company could in fact read messages due to the way WhatsApp has implemented its end-to-end encryption protocol.

  • Hacker group Shadow Brokers retires, dumps more code as parting gift

    The Shadow Brokers claimed to have held even more valuable cyber tools in reserve and offered to sell them to the highest bidder in an unorthodox public auction. On Thursday, they said their sales effort had been unsuccessful and were therefore ceasing operations. “So long, farewell peoples. The Shadow Brokers is going dark, making exit,” the group said according to a screenshot of the webpage posted Thursday on the news website CyberScoop.

  • Suspected NSA tool hackers dump more cyberweapons in farewell

    The hacking group that stole cyberweapons suspected to be from the U.S. National Security Agency is signing off -- but not before releasing another arsenal of tools that appear designed to spy on Windows systems.

  • Shadow Brokers announce retirement, leak NSA Windows Hacking tools as parting gift
  • The Shadow Brokers Leaves the Stage with a Gift of So-Called NSA-Sourced Hacking Tools
  • Shadow Brokers group bids adieu, dumps hacking tools before going silent
  • 'It Always Being About Bitcoins': Shadow Brokers Retire
  • Hacking Group 'ShadowBrokers' Release NSA Exploits, Then Go Dark

Microsoft Windows Runs Under Windows

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Linux Arrives On Windows 10

    Sr. Product Manager SUSE Linux Enterprise SUSE, Hannes Kühnemund, has written a blog post and described how to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 SP2 on Windows 10. Now, by running simple commands, the users can install SUSE Linux distributions in Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). The company has also prepared a detailed blog post and described the whole procedure. For those who don’t know, by default, Microsoft enabled Ubuntu within WSL.

  • OpenSUSE comes to Windows 10. Plus, can you trust WhatsApp?

    This is the first in a weekey series I'm calling ‘weekly roundup’ in which I will highlight some of the hottest stories of the week from the world of Linux and open source. This week, I want to call your attention to some excciting Windows 10/openSUSE news and alert you to a backdoor vulnerability in WhatsApp that allows messages to be intercepted.

Blob-less Raspberry Pi Linux Is A Step Closer

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi single board computer has been an astounding success since its launch nearly five years ago, to the extent that as of last autumn it had sold ten million units with no sign of sales abating. It has delivered an extremely affordable and pretty powerful computer into the hands of hobbyists, youngsters, hackers, engineers and thousands of other groups, and its open-source Raspbian operating system has brought a useful Linux environment to places we might once have thought impossible.

The previous paragraph, we have to admit, is almost true. The Pi has sold a lot, it’s really useful and lots of people use it, but is Raspbian open-source? Not strictly. Because the Broadcom silicon that powers the Pi has a significant amount of proprietary tech that the chipmaker has been unwilling to let us peer too closely at, each and every Raspberry Pi operating system has shipped with a precompiled binary blob containing the proprietary Broadcom code, and of course that’s the bit that isn’t open source. It hasn’t been a problem for most Pi users as it’s understood to be part of the trade-off that enabled the board’s creators to bring it to us at an affordable price back in 2012, but for open-source purists it’s been something of a thorn in the side of the little board from Cambridge.

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Linus Torvalds Announces Subsurface 4.6 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning App

Linus Torvalds not only works on the Linux kernel, but he's also part of the development team behind the open-source dive log and dive planning application most of you out there know as Subsurface. Read more

openSUSE Tumbleweed Gets XOrg Server 1.19 & Irssi 1.0, PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon

openSUSE Project's Douglas DeMaio is informing the Tumbleweed community today, January 18, 2017, about the latest software updates and other improvements delivered by a total of two snapshots released last week. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Linux use on Pornhub surged 14% in 2016
    Pornhub is one of the preeminent porn sites on the web. Each year Pornhub releases a year in review post with anonymous details about the site’s users. More and more Linux users are visiting Pornhub, Linux saw an impressive 14% increase in traffic share in 2016.
  • Amdocs partners with Linux Foundation to accelerate OpenECOMP adoption in Open Source
  • Calamares 2.4.6 Distribution-Independent Linux Installer Delivers Improvements
    The Calamares team is proud to announce the availability of the sixth maintenance update to the 2.4 stable series of the open-source, distribution-independent system installer Calamares, for Linux-based operating systems. Calamares 2.4.6 comes approximately two months after the release of the previous version, namely Calamares 2.4.5, and, as expected, it's a bugfix release that only delivers various improvements and bug fixes for some of the issues reported by users during all this time.
  • Shotwell Photo Manager 0.25.3 Released
    Photography fans will be pleased to hear that a new bug-fix release of photo management app Shotwell is now available to download.
  • AntiX 16.1 is available for public
    AntiX is Debian based Linux distribution. It uses lightweight desktop environments like Fluxbox, Icewm, Xfce, etc. This distribution is originated in Greece and is typically ideal for old systems. Few hours ago AntiX team released new version named AntiX 16.1. It is based on Debian Jessie.
  • Tumbleweed Preps for PulseAudio 10, Gets Ruby, Python Updates
    Developers using openSUSE Tumbleweed are always getting the newest packages as well as updated languages and past week’s snapshots delivered update versions of Python and Ruby. The most recent snapshot, 20170112, brought Python 2.x users version 2.7.13, which updated cipher lists for openSSL wrapper and supports versions equal to or greater than OpenSSL 1.1.0. Python-unidecode 0.04.20 was also updated in the snapshot. Another update related to OpenSSL 1.1.0 was PulseAudio 9.99.1, which is a release in preparation for PulseAudio 10.0. PulseAudio 10.0 includes compatibility with OpenSSL 1.1.0, a fix for hotplugged USB surround sound cards and and automatic switching of Bluetooth profile when using VoIP applications.
  • Genode OS Framework Planning For Async I/O, App ABI, Qt5 Plans For 2017
    The Genode Operating System Framework has announced their planned roadmap for this year as the involved developers continue working on this original OS initiative. The overall theme of the Genode OS work in 2017 is to focus on stability and scalability, but there is also much more on their road-map for this calendar year.
  • PrestaShop
    Helping people overcome the challenges of building and growing an online business is what the PrestaShop open-source ecommerce platform is all about. The significant PrestaShop 1.7 release provides innovations focused on three themes: sell faster, create easier and code better.
  • This Week in Spring: Reactor 3.0, Open Source CD, and All Kinds of Cloud

Linux on Servers

  • IBM i Open Source Business Architect Lays Out A Plan
    Enterprise level application development is no place for open source languages. Can you believe it? That was once the widely accepted truth. Jiminy Crickets! Things have changed. The number of the stable open source distributions available with comprehensive support and maintenance goes well beyond common knowledge. Industry giants, successful SMB players, and mom and pop businesses are finding good reasons to use open source. Even IBM uses open source for internal business reasons. There are reasons for you to do the same.
  • Lightning Talk - Realizing the Multi-Cloud Promise of Kubernetes by Blake White, The Walt Disney Co.
  • How Disney Is Realizing the Multi-Cloud Promise of Kubernetes
    The Walt Disney Company is famous for “making magic happen,” and their cross-cloud, enterprise level Kubernetes implementation is no different. In a brief but information-packed lightning talk at CloudNativeCon in Seattle in November, Disney senior cloud engineer Blake White laid out a few of the struggles and solutions in making Kubernetes work across clouds.
  • Puppet Launches its Latest State of DevOps Survey
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet is still making news, creating jobs and more.