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Tuesday, 24 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME News Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 8:34pm
Story GNU/Linux Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:45pm
Story Leftovers: Devuan and Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:41pm
Story Linux Devices Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:40pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:39pm
Story Development News Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:36pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:29pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 3:27pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 1:04pm
Story Xubuntu Xenial Xerus - Triple X - The spy who failed me Roy Schestowitz 22/05/2016 - 12:04pm

BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition review: A rocky start to a new era

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Let me be clear. In reviewing the Aquaris M10, I was very aware that I was reviewing not just the device but the Ubuntu mobile platform. In fact, the review is less about the device than about where Ubuntu stands now in the tablet space and the potential and possibilities the future holds.

Ubuntu mobile is a very promising platform; it just needs some constructive feedback so that developers can improve the user experience. I consider this tablet something similar to Google Glass: a prototype that gives you a glimpse of what to expect from Ubuntu on tablets.

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German experts update free software legal review

Filed under
OSS
Legal

Two German legal experts have published the fourth edition of their review of legal issues regarding the use of free software. The book by Till Jaeger, a Berlin-based lawyer specialised in legal issues concerning open source software, and Axel Metzger, professor at the Humboldt University in the same city, appeared in March.

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France’s RGI v2 recommends ODF

Filed under
OSS

The French government has updated the interoperablity guidelines (RGI – Référence Général d’Intéropérabilité), replacing version 1 published in 2009. In this v2, officially published on April 22, 2016, ODF is now considered as a recommended standard to manage exchange between administrations and citizens.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Bodhi Linux 3.2.1 With Moksha: Another Path to Enlightenment

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Actually, I suppose I loved Mandrake first, which I installed back in ’02 and used, like. forever. But at that time it wasn’t the distro I loved so much as GNU/Linux. I had no experience with other distros, even though I knew about them, so Mandrake represented, by proxy, all of Linux. Such is the way it goes with new Linux users.

Around 2008, when Mandrake/Mandriva’s future became uncertain, I moved on to distro hop for a while, not finding anything that really tripped my trigger. However, PCLOS came close, not surprisingly given its Mandrake roots, and became the distro I used for a number of years. Then an install failure, followed by an inability to login or open an account on the distro’s forum, prompted me to move on.

Which led me to Bodhi, a resource sipping Ubuntu based distro using the Enlightenment desktop version 17, or E17, which at the time was the most elegant and configurable of the lightweight desktops available.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Google opens up Android N beta to everyone

    The new features included in Android N are far too many to list, but Google promises the operating system will provide better performance, enhanced security, streamlined notifications, and most importantly, 72 new emojis.

  • Google Play Along With All Android Apps Are Coming To Chrome OS

    There were a lot of exciting Google announcements yesterday in kicking off the company's annual I/O conference while today there's a big piece of news: the Google Play store is coming to Chrome OS. Yes, all Android apps.

  • 5 Android N features you won’t find on any iPhone

    Google’s big I/O 2016 keynote is now behind us and it was easily one of the most action-packed Google events we’ve seen in a long, long time. Be sure to check out our earlier post to read about the 8 most important announcements from Google I/O 2016.

  • Unity and Unreal engines will support Android's Daydream VR

    Google's new virtual reality program is getting some huge support from the gaming world. It was announced today that Unreal and Unity — two of the biggest names in game engines — will be adding support for Daydream, Android's new VR initiative.

  • Pepper the robot is opening up to Android

    SoftBank's Pepper robot is about to get a lot more developer-friendly. The Japanese firm announced today that it'll be opening up Pepper's tablet to Google's mobile OS, in the hopes of spurring on its capabilities with new apps, Bloomberg reports. SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son initially wanted to keep Pepper's entire platform closed, and it took a loss on every $1,800 robot it sold to drive its cost down. Unfortunately, despite selling around 10,000 units, developers have been slow to bite.

  • Android Pay UK: Google phone-based payment system arrives in first country outside the US
  • Larry Page spars with Oracle attorney at Android trial

    Google did not pay to use Oracle's software in millions of smartphones, but the company believed that the intellectual property was free for anyone to use, Larry Page, chief executive of Google's parent company, told jurors in court on Thursday.

    In a retrial at San Francisco federal court, Oracle Corp (ORCL.N) has claimed Google's Android smartphone operating system violated its copyright on parts of Java, a development platform. Alphabet Inc's (GOOGL.O) Google unit said it should be able to use Java without paying a fee under the fair-use provision of copyright law.

  • CEO Larry Page defends Google on the stand: “Declaring code is not code”

    Alphabet CEO Larry Page testified in federal court this morning, saying that he never considered getting permission to use Java APIs, because they were "free and open."

    The CEO of Alphabet, Google's parent company, spoke in a soft staccato and was hard to understand at times. (Page suffers from a condition that affects his vocal chords.) Page testified for about a half-hour, answering a lightning-fast round of accusatory questions from Oracle attorney Peter Bicks.

  • Oracle-Google Dispute Goes to Heart of Open-Source Software

    The copyrights that are crucial to the trial are related to open-source software, which is created and shared for general use.

  • Under oath, Larry Page disputes that Android is a $43 billion business for Google

    Oracle is suing Google for billions of dollars and on Thursday Larry Page, the CEO of Google parent company Alphabet, was called to the stand by Oracle's lawyers to testify.

  • Economist: There Was No 'Fair Use' of Java APIs in Android

Brian Behlendorf and Blockchain

Filed under
OSS

Open365 and ownCloud

Filed under
OSS
  • Open365 an Open Source Takes On Microsoft Office 365

    Open365 is completely open source office available for both the online and offline. Download the software and install in your computers and mobiles. This cloud service and desktop service is provided completely free for all. Open365 is the combination of LibreOffice online + Seafile + KDE. This helps you to improve the productivity and communicate better with the team.

  • Open365: An free Open Source Office 365, Google Docs alternative

    Open365 is a free open source alternative to Microsoft’s Office 365 and Google Docs. It features a complete online interface that lets you edit documents online and sync them with the cloud.

  • The future of sharing: integrating Pydio and ownCloud

    The open source file sharing ecosystem accommodates a large variety of projects, each supplying their own solution, and each with a different approach. There are a lot of reasons to choose an open source solution rather than commercial solutions like Dropbox, Google Drive, iCloud, or OneDrive. These solutions offer to take away worries about managing your data but come with certain limitations, including a lack of control and integration into existing infrastructure.

Purism introduces privacy-focused 2-in-1 tablet

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Like their laptop predecessors, the Librem 10 and 11-inch tablets are running free and open source software and are targeted at users that want more privacy than is available from major manufacturers. Both devices run PureOS 3.0 Linux and have privacy protecting services like Tor, HTTPS Everywhere and ad blocker Privacy Badger pre-installed. The company is working towards getting both devices QubesOS (the OS of choice of Edward Snowden) certified.

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Also: Purism introduces privacy-focused, Linux tablets for $599 and up

What is Linux?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

What is Linux? It means different things to different people, from the purist who considers it to be the kernel, to the GNU advocate who sees it as a part of GNU/Linux and the new user who thinks it is another name for Ubuntu.

In truth, Linux is all of these, depending on your point of view. Strictly speaking, the term Linux used alone refers to the kernel of the operating system, while GNU/Linux is the whole operating system, comprising the Linux kernel and GNU tools – either would be useless without the other (or one of its alternatives).

If you then add a collection of application software, along with some tools to manage the whole thing, you have a distro, such as Ubuntu.

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Libreboot, Coreboot Downstream, Becomes A GNU Project

Filed under
GNU

Libreboot, the downstream of Coreboot that doesn't permit any closed-source microcode/firmware blobs as part of the hardware initialization process for this alternative to proprietary BIOS/UEFI, has become an official GNU project.

As of a few days ago, Libreboot is officially a GNU project. It's not too surprising though considering tends to be what runs on the systems endorsed by the FSF due to freeing systems down to the BIOS compared to Coreboot that still permits some binary-only modules for modern hardware. Libreboot is basically a de-blobbed version of Coreboot.

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GNOME 3.21.2 unstable tarballs due (responsible: jjardon)

Filed under
GNOME

Hello all,

Tarballs are due on 2016-05-23 before 23:59 UTC for the GNOME 3.21.2
unstable release, which will be delivered on Wednesday. Modules which
were proposed for inclusion should try to follow the unstable schedule
so everyone can test them. Please make sure that your tarballs will
be uploaded before Monday 23:59 UTC: tarballs uploaded later than that
will probably be too late to get in 3.21.2. If you are not able to
make a tarball before this deadline or if you think you'll be late,
please send a mail to the release team and we'll find someone to roll
the tarball for you!

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Pinguy OS Developer Wants to Pull the Plug On His Ubuntu-Based Operating System

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

Just a few minutes ago, Antoni Roman, the developer of the Ubuntu-based Pinguy OS GNU/Linux operating system wrote a short blog post on the distro's website to inform the community that he wants to pull the plug on the entire project.

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i.MX7 computer-on-module may be smallest yet

Filed under
Android
Linux

Embedded Artists and Rohm have launched a 37 x 27mm COM built around an NXP i.MX7 featuring a low-power Rohm PMIC, 1GB LP-DDR3, and 8GB eMMC.

You know the Internet of Things has become “a thing” when the main selling point of a computer-on-module is the properties of its power management IC. In the case of the iMX7 Dual uCOM Board from Swedish embedded firm Embedded Artists and Japanese IC semiconductor firm Rohm, however, the module has more than its power-sipping Rohm BD71815GW PMIC going for it. Measuring a wee 37 x 27mm, the Linux-friendly uCOM also appears to be one of the smallest COMs to date built on NXP’s power-stingy i.MX7 Dual SoC.

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Kernel Space/Linux

Filed under
Linux

Mozilla Steps beyond Open Source with Gigabit Internet Funding in Austin

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

Mozilla has built its name on open source software. But its latest Gigabit funding initiative, which piggybacks on Google Fiber, extends the organization's reach into networking and hardware by supporting the development of robotics, big data and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions.

On Wednesday Mozilla announced that, in August, it will expand its National Gigabit Community Fund to Austin, Texas. The fund originated in 2014 in Chattanooga and Kansas City.

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Sneak peek: Arduino Srl’s Primo and Primo Core IoT duo

Filed under
Linux

Although neither of the Primo products runs Linux, they differ significantly from previous Arduino boards, in that they don’t run their sketches on the traditional Atmega32 MCU, but instead tap the beefier MPU that’s embedded within the IoT-oriented, Nordic Semiconductor nRF52 wireless system-on-chip that implements all but one of the boards’ multi-wireless features. Despite the change in MCU architecture, the Primo and Primo Core run existing Arduino sketches, and are programmed using the familiar Arduino IDE. To this end, Arduino Srl’s software team is busy ensuring that any Arduino sketch will work exactly the same on the new MCU, as on the Atmega32.

The Primo SBC offers a broad spectrum of wireless capabilities, including WiFi, BLE, NFC, and IR, with all but WiFi implemented by the Nordic Semiconductor nRF52 SoC. A second MCU-controlled wireless SoC, the Espressif ESP8266, is responsible for the board’s WiFi connectivity.

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AMDGPU-PRO OpenCL vs. NVIDIA 364 Compute Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

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