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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora and Pi Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:25am
Story Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:21am
Story Why Security Distributions Use Debian Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:07am
Story How to incorporate open source into computer science classes Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:04am
Story Systemd – Progress Through Complexity Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 10:03am
Story Bodhi 2.3.0 beta Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:54am
Story Clear Linux Now Powered by Kernel 4.8.1, Adds Wayland 1.12, GNOME 3.22 & Vim 8.0 Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:52am
Story Tiny OpenWRT WiFi module updated in $12 and $4 versions Rianne Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:49am
Story 3 Twitter clients for the Linux command line Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 9:03am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2016 - 5:00am

Security News

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  • Tuesday's security updates
  • Critical flaws found in open-source encryption software VeraCrypt [Ed: TrueCrypt was never really FOSS]

    A new security audit has found critical vulnerabilities in VeraCrypt, an open-source, full-disk encryption program that's the direct successor of the widely popular, but now defunct, TrueCrypt.

    Users are encouraged to upgrade to VeraCrypt 1.19, which was released Monday and includes patches for most of the flaws. Some issues remain unpatched because fixing them requires complex changes to the code and in some cases would break backward compatibility with TrueCrypt.

    However, the impact of most of those issues can be avoided by following the safe practices mentioned in the VeraCrypt user documentation when setting up encrypted containers and using the software.

  • Veracode: open source is creating 'systematic risks' across companies and industries [Ed: this company routinely smears FOSS]

    SECURITY FIRM VERACODE has released a damning report into open source and third-party software components and warned that, for example, almost all Java applications are blighted with at least one problem.

  • Why is Java so insecure? Buggy open source components take the blame

    Open-source and Java components used in applications remain a weak spot for the enterprise, according to a new analysis.

    Java applications in particular are posing a challenge, with 97 percent of these applications containing a component with at least one known vulnerability, according to a new report from code-analysis security vendor Veracode.

  • Parrot Security 3.2 “CyberSloop” Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Available For Download

    Earlier this year, I prepared a list of the top operating systems used for ethical hacking purposes. In that list, Parrot Security OS ranked at #2. It’s developed by Frozenbox Network and released under the GNU/GPL v3 license. A couple of days ago, Parrot Security 3.2 ethical hacking Linux distro arrived. The new version of this popular operating system is codenamed CyberSloop and it’s based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 Stretch.

    Parrot Security 3.1 version arrived long back in July. Compared to that, the new version has taken a while due to some buggy packages in the Debian Testing repository that Parrot Security team had to fix themselves. In particular, the bug being discussed here is the latest GTK updates that broke the MATE interface.

  • Linux-run IoT devices under attack by NyaDrop [Ed: Devices with open ports and identical passwords across the board are not secure; not “Linux” issue]

    Internet of Things (IoT) devices running on the open-source Linux OS are under attack from NyaDrop.

    The attack loads malware on IoT devices lacking appropriate security after brute forcing default login credentials, according to a report by David Bisson for Graham Cluley Security News. The code achieves this by parsing its list of archived usernames and passwords. Once authenticated, NyaDrop is installed. The lightweight binary then loads other malware onto the infected device.

Android Leftovers

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Ubuntu 16.10: Yakkety Yak... Unity 8's not wack

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Canonical's Ubuntu 16.10, codenamed "Yakkety Yak", is nowhere near as chunky an update as 16.04 LTS was earlier this year. But that doesn't mean there's nothing new. In fact, the firm's second release of the year has quite a few fresh features to hold users over until the bright and shiny future of Unity 8 and Mir arrive some time next year.

Nevertheless, it's very odd to have what feels like a smaller update arrive with Ubuntu's October release, which typically is the more experimental release with tons of new features being tested. This time around that's not really the case. In what's become a familiar refrain for Ubuntu, most of the work is happening with the still-not-quite-there Unity 8.

Ubuntu 16.10 marks the seventh time Unity 8 has not been ready for prime time. While Unity 8 appears to be progressing - judging by developer updates and playing with pre-release versions - it is, at this point, in danger of joining Duke Nukem Forever on the great vaporware list in the sky. Still, take heart Ubuntu fans, just as Duke Nukem Forever did eventually see the light of day, it seems very likely that Unity 8 and Mir will in fact be released eventually. Perhaps even as early as 17.04. Also, I have a bridge for sale, if anyone is interested.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Unity 8 Preview In Ubuntu 16.10

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Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak has just been released with quite a few number of new stuff and a first preview of Unity 8 desktop environment. Unity could be installed in Ubuntu 16.04 but it comes with 16.10 pre-installed. Unity 8 has been in development since 2013 and anyone who has seen or used Ubuntu phone will quickly notice the similarities and some major differences.

Read<br />

Parted Magic 2016_10_18 Disk Partitioning Live CD Released with over 800 Updates

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Today, October 18, 2016, Parted Magic LLC announced the release and general availability of a new, updated version of their once free Parted Magic disk partitioning Live CD.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Tor Project Releases Tor (The Onion Router) with New Security Fixes

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Tor Project informed the Tor (The Onion Router) community about the immediate availability of the Tor stable update, which adds a few important security fixes to keep your Tor installation reliable at all times.

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Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop Gaming Benchmarks: Unity, GNOME, Xfce, LXDE, KDE, Openbox, MATE

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As usual when there's a new Ubuntu Linux, the requests come in for running OpenGL graphics/game benchmarks under the different desktop options. For some Ubuntu 16.10 on Intel Mesa graphics tests are results for GNOME Shell, Xfce, LXDE, KDE Plasma, Openbox, MATE, and Unity running atop X.Org.

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Wine and Games for GNU/Linux

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  • Wine-Staging Release 1.9.21

    The Wine Staging release 1.9.21 is now available.

  • Wine-Staging 1.9.21 Improves Its Vulkan Wrapper

    Re-basing to last week's Wine 1.9.21 release is a new version of Wine-Staging that incorporates various experimental/testing patches atop this code-base for running Windows binaries on Linux and other operating systems.

    Notable to Wine-Staging 1.9.21 are improvements around its experimental Vulkan wrapper, which allows for running Windows Vulkan programs that in turn rely upon host's native Vulkan driver. There is also a GIF encoder added to its Windows codecs implementation.

  • Feral have released the minimum and recommend system requirements for Mad Max on Linux

    The release of Mad Max [Steam, Feral Interactive] for Linux is fast approaching this week (20th!) and Feral have now updated their website with the minimum and recommended system specifications.

Canonical Now Offering Live Kernel Patching Services, Free for Up to Three PCs

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Today, October 18, 2016, Canonical informs us, through Dustin Kirkland, about a new interesting feature for Ubuntu Linux, which users can enable on their current installations.

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Also: Canonical Rolls Out Its Own Kernel Livepatching Service For Ubuntu

Plasma’s road ahead

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On Monday, KDE’s Plasma team held its traditional kickoff meeting for the new development cycle. We took this opportunity to also look and plan ahead a bit further into the future. In what areas are we lacking, where do we want or need to improve? Where do we want to take Plasma in the next two years?

Our general direction points towards professional use-cases. We want Plasma to be a solid tool, a reliable work-horse that gets out of the way, allowing to get the job done quickly and elegantly. We want it to be faster and of better quality than the competition.

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Senior Gains Web Development Experience at Red Hat Internship

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Red Hat

High Point University senior Ryan Long got a taste of his dream career during a web development and design internship at Red Hat in Raleigh.

Long, an interactive media and game design major and computer science minor from Fort Mill, South Carolina, gained valuable experience with the IT marketing team. He worked with the company’s website, fixing broken links, inserting translations and doing quality assurance. He also provided graphic design assistance and collaborated with the video team for projects that would be incorporated into the website.

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Raspberry Pi (2 and 3) support in Fedora 25 Beta!

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Red Hat

So support for the Raspberry Pi in Fedora has been a long time coming and yes, it’s FINALLY here with support landing just in time for Beta!

The most asked question I’ve had for a number of years is around support of the Raspberry Pi. It’s also something I’ve been working towards for a very long time on my own time. The eagle-eye watchers would have noticed we almost got there with Fedora 24, but I got pipped at the post because I felt it wasn’t quite good enough yet. There were too many minor issues around ease of use.

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Open-source storage that doesn't suck? Our man tries to break TrueNAS

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Review Data storage is difficult, and ZFS-based storage doubly so. There's a lot of money to be made if you can do storage right, so it's uncommon to see a storage company with an open-source model deliver storage that doesn't suck.

I looked at TrueNAS from iXsystems, which, importantly, targets the SMB and midmarket with something that is theoretically more resilient than a Synology. That's really odd. Not a lot of companies do that, so it intrigued me.

I'd also had a few interesting conversations with some Reg readers about the dearth of storage offerings for the "small, but not Synology small" business space.

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Google open sources the code that powers its domain registry

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Google today released Nomulus, the Java-based registry platform that powers Google’s own .google and .foo top level domains (TLDs).

Google says it started working on the technology behind Nomulus after the company applied to operate a number of generic TLDs itself back in 2012. Until then, domain names were mostly restricted to the .com’s, .net’s and various country-level TLDs like .de and .uk. Once the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) decided to open TLDs up to so-called generic TLD’s like .app, .blog and .guru, Google jumped into the fray and applied for .google and a number of other TLDs.

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Meet Maui 1, the Slick New Hawaiian Netrunner

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Maui, the Netrunner Kubuntu replacement, is an inviting alternative. It is both new and already accomplished. The developers took a Kubuntu distro that was well-oiled but at the end of its development line to the next level.

That should make adopting the Maui Linux distro a less risky option. Most other Linux distros are moving in the new direction of Wayland, Systemd and such. Maui's developers are already there.

Maui 1 is very stable and easy to use. It is a well-stocked distribution with an established library of KDE software.

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i.MX6-based Mini-ITX SBC does triple displays

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Advantech launched one of the first ARM Mini-ITX SBCs. The RSB-6410 runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and has mini-PCIe, SATA, M.2, and triple displays.

Advantech calls the RSB-6410 the world’s first RISC-based Mini-ITX motherboard. Considering that all ARM Cortex-A SoCs are RISC SoCs, there have actually been a few others, but it’s still a rarity for this x86-oriented, 170 x 170mm form factor.

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today's leftovers

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  • Useful Vim editor plugins for software developers - part 2: Syntastic
  • halting problem :: Constraints
  • Release Candidate Available for openSUSE Leap 42.2

    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the availability of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 Release Candidate 1 (RC1).

    Since mid-May, the project has been guiding the development of the next openSUSE community release Leap 42.2, which will be released in 29 days. The release of RC1 completes the development process for openSUSE Leap 42.2 based on source code from SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) Service Pack (SP) 2.

  • Using feedback loops for greater work satisfaction

    In August I wrote about using feedback loops in your personal life to get unstuck from unproductive habits. This month I'll talk about some new helpful feedback loops for your workplace. I'm going to make this easy for you: Here are my top three, and they're always good ones to start with.

  • Red Hat study shows virtualization will keep growing

    With the rise of exciting new technologies like containers, virtualization might sometimes seem like it’s old hat. But not according to Red Hat, whose latest research shows that enterprise adoption is still on the rise.

    In a new survey of over 900 enterprise information technology pros, Red Hat discovered that virtualization is still gaining traction thanks to its ability to drive server consolidation, reduce provisioning times, serve as platform for app development and deployment and save enterprises money.

Development News

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  • KDevelop 5.0.2 released and available for Download

    Kdevelop is an IDE,available on Linux and Windows,so it covers a good users' response or in other words,we should say,CODERS' response Tongue.
    Anyway,Today Few hours ago,Sven Brauch made an announcement regarding the release of the next maintenance update of the Kdevelop 5.X series.

  • GTK Scene Kit Merged For GTK4

    The GTK+ Scene Graph Kit (GSK) has landed in mainline GTK+ Git as the "spiritual successor to Clutter" and now providing a scene graph for this GNOME toolkit.

  • This Week in GTK+ – 20

    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 191 commits, with 4159 lines added and 64248 lines removed.

  • The Linux Foundation strives to unite open-source JavaScript community
  • The Linux Foundation Helps Launch the JS Foundation

    Today, the Linux Foundation announced the creation of a new entity named the JS Foundation that will serve as an umbrella project and guiding force for various open-source utilities at the heart of the JavaScript ecosystem.

    The JS Foundation's primary mission is to help manage and fund projects, but also cultivate best practices in the JavaScript ecosystem.

  • The Ops Identity Crisis

    A big theme in the keynotes and conversation during Velocity Conf in NYC a few weeks ago was the role of ops in an "ops-less" and "server-less" world. It's also been a big feature in discussions on twitter and in conversations I've had with coworkers and friends in the industry. There are several things that stand out to me in these conversations: first, that some ops engineers (sysadmins, techops, devops, and SREs) are worried that they will be phased out if developers and software engineers are responsible for the operational tasks in their systems; second, that developers and software engineers do not have the skills needed to take over responsibility for operational tasks; and third, that building reliable systems is impossible without an operations organization.

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More in Tux Machines

Tizen News

  • New details revealed about future Samsung QLED TVs
    Samsung has unveiled the latest details of his stunning, next-generation TV. Named SUHD Qualmark Red TV, it’s based on the proprietary technology Samsung has pioneered: QLED, long for Quantum dot Light-Emitting Diode. According to sources from Samsung Electronics, the product will cover the high-end spectrum of the market, proposing itself as the top premium TV produced by the South Korean company. This move, which confirms Samsung’s continuos attention to innovation, proves the drive of the enterprise on delivering the highest quality products with consistency while maintaining a strong focus on research and development.
  • Samsung Z2 Officially Launched in Indonesia
    The Samsung Z2 launch which was initially planned for the month of September in Indonesia, however that didn’t turn out to be true. Samsung Indonesia have finally launched the Z2 in the country at an official launch event. The launch took place at the country’s capital Jakarta on Wednesday that is the 19th of October. The smartphone has been priced at 899,000 Indonesian Rupiah ($70 approx.). Samsung are also bundling a free Batik back cover with the smartphone for the early customers. This is also the first Tizen smartphone to be launched in Indonesia.
  • Game: Candy Funny for your Tizen smartphone
    Here is another puzzle type game that has recently hit the Tizen Store for you to enjoy. “Candy Funny” is brought to you by developer Julio Cesar and is very similar to Candy Crush. You have 300 levels available to play and all levels have 3 stars , the number of stars shows how good or bad you actually are. You don’t have much time to accumulate the highest score you can and unlock further screens.
  • Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016 Game for Tizen Smartphones
    Games2Win India Pvt. Ltd. ( an Indian app development company has more than 800 proprietary apps and games in all smartphone and tablet platforms. Now, they have 51 million downloads of their apps and games in all platforms. They have already got 8 games in the Tizen Store and today they added a new cricket game “Master Blaster T20 Cup 2016”.
  • Slender Man Game Series now available on Tizen Store

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Rivals Red Hat, Mirantis Announce New OpenStack Partnerships
    The cloud rivals both announce new telco alliances as competition in the cloud market heats up. Red Hat and Mirantis both announced large agreements this week that bring their respective OpenStack technologies to carrier partners. The news comes ahead of the OpenStack Summit that kicks off in Barcelona, Spain, on Oct. 24. Red Hat announced on Oct. 19 that it has a new OpenStack partnership with telco provider Ericsson. "Ericsson and Red Hat recognize that we share a common belief in using open source to transform the telecommunications industry, and we are collaborating to bring more open solutions, from OpenStack-based clouds to software-defined networking and infrastructure, to customers," Radhesh Balakrishnan, general manager of OpenStack at Red Hat, told eWEEK.
  • Turbulent Week Ends, How Did This Stock Fare: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Flatpak; the road to CI/CD for desktop applications?
    In this presentation I will introduce Flatpak and how it changes the software distribution model for Linux. In short it will explain the negatives of using packages, how Flatpak solves this, and how to create your own applications and distribute them for use with Flatpak. This presentation was given at the GNOME 3.22 release party, organized by the Beijing GNOME User Group.
  • The who in the where?
    The job is like many other roles called “Community Manager” or “Community Lead.” That means there is a focus on metrics and experiences. One role is to try ensure smooth forward movement of the project towards its goals. Another role is to serve as a source of information and motivation. Another role is as a liaison between the project and significant downstream and sponsoring organizations. In Fedora, this means I help the Fedora Project Leader. I try to be the yen to his yang, the zig to his zag, or the right hand to his right elbow. In all seriousness, it means that I work on a lot of the non-engineering focused areas of the Fedora Project. While Matthew has responsibility for the project as a whole I try to think about users and contributors and be mechanics of keeping the project running smoothly.

Development News

  • Eclipse Foundation Collaboration Yields Open Source Technology for Computational Science
    The gap between the computational science and open source software communities just got smaller – thanks to a collaboration among national laboratories, universities and industry.
  • PyCon India 2016
    “This is awesome!”, this was my first reaction when I boarded my first flight to Delhi. I was having trouble in finding a proper accommodation Kushal, Sayan and Chandan helped me a lot in that part, I finally got honour of bunking with Sayan , Subho and Rtnpro which I will never forget. So, I landed and directly went to JNU convention center. I met the whole Red Hat intern gang . It was fun to meet them all. I had proposed Pagure for Dev Sprint and I pulled in Vivek to do the same. The dev sprint started and there was no sign of Vivek or Saptak, Saptak is FOSSASIA contributor and Vivek contributes to Pagure with me. Finally it was my turn to talk about Pagure on stage , it was beautiful the experience and the energy. We got a lot of young and new contributors and we tried to guide them and make them send at least one PR. One of them was lucky enough to actually make a PR and it got readily merged.
  • Hack This: An Overdue Python Primer
    In writing the most recent Hack This ("Scrape the Web with Beautiful Soup") I again found myself trapped between the competing causes of blog-brevity and making sure everything is totally clear for non-programmers. It's a tough spot! Recapping every little Python (the default language of Hack This) concept is tiring for everyone, but what's the point in the first place if no one can follow what's going on? This post is then intended then as a sort of in-between edition of Hack This, covering a handful of Python features that are going to recur in pretty much every programming tutorial that we do under the Hack This name. A nice thing about Python is that it makes many things much clearer than is possible in almost any other language.
  • Why I won’t be attending Systems We Love
    Here’s one way to put it: to me, Bryan Cantrill is the opposite of another person I admire in operating systems (whom I will leave unnamed). This person makes me feel excited and welcome and safe to talk about and explore operating systems. I’ve never seen them shame or insult or put down anyone. They enthusiastically and openly talk about learning new systems concepts, even when other people think they should already know them. By doing this, they show others that it’s safe to admit that they don’t know something, which is the first step to learning new things. They are helping create the kind of culture I want in systems programming – the kind of culture promoted by Papers We Love, which Bryan cites as the inspiration for Systems We Love. By contrast, when I’m talking to Bryan I feel afraid, cautious, and fearful. Over the years I worked with Bryan, I watched him shame and insult hundreds of people, in public and in private, over email and in person, in papers and talks. Bryan is no Linus Torvalds – Bryan’s insults are usually subtle, insinuating, and beautifully phrased, whereas Linus’ insults tend towards the crude and direct. Even as you are blushing in shame from what Bryan just said about you, you are also admiring his vocabulary, cadence, and command of classical allusion. When I talked to Bryan about any topic, I felt like I was engaging in combat with a much stronger foe who only wanted to win, not help me learn. I always had the nagging fear that I probably wouldn’t even know how cleverly he had insulted me until hours later. I’m sure other people had more positive experiences with Bryan, but my experience matches that of many others. In summary, Bryan is supporting the status quo of the existing culture of systems programming, which is a culture of combat, humiliation, and domination. [...] He gaily recounts the time he gave a highly critical keynote speech at USENIX, bashfully links to a video praising him at a Papers We Love event, elegantly puts down most of the existing operating systems research community, and does it all while using the words “ancillary,” “verve,” and “quadrennial.” Once you know the underlying structure – a layer cake of vituperation and braggadocio, frosted with eloquence – you can see the same pattern in most of his writing and talks.

Android Leftovers