Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Aug 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 1:24pm
Story FOSS Events Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 1:21pm
Story Rust and Mozilla Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 1:20pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 1:14pm
Story More on Munich, Linux Coming Out Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 12:16pm
Story GNOME Video Arcade Gets a Major Release with Compatibility for Latest MAME and GTK3 Rianne Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 10:25am
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-7 Arrives in October with Vibration and Accelerometer Access for Web Apps Rianne Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 10:23am
Story The Liquorix Kernel Is Still Ticking, Currently Based On Linux 4.1 Rianne Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 10:21am
Story The Raspberry Pi is succeeding in ways its makers almost imagined Rianne Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 10:14am
Story Why FreeBSD should not adopt launchd Roy Schestowitz 27/08/2015 - 10:05am

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source for products in four rules (and 10 slides)
  • Apache Twill: real abstraction is a decoupled algorithm

    To be clearer, this term decoupling arises time & time again in relation to the cloud computing model of service-based processing and storage power.

  • Great Open Source Collaborative Editing Tools

    In a nutshell, collaborative writing is writing done by more than one person. There are benefits and risks of collaborative working. Some of the benefits include a more integrated / co-ordinated approach, better use of existing resources, and a stronger, united voice. For me, the greatest advantage is one of the most transparent. That's when I need to take colleagues' views. Sending files back and forth between colleagues is inefficient, causes unnecessary delays and leaves people (i.e. me) unhappy with the whole notion of collaboration. With good collaborative software, I can share notes, data and files, and use comments to share thoughts in real-time or asynchronously. Working together on documents, images, video, presentations, and tasks is made less of a chore.

  • Parse open sources its SDKs

    Earlier this month, mobile backend-as-a-service provider Parse open sourced its iOS, OS X, and Android SDKs, and will be open sourcing additional SDKs in the future.

    Parse, which was acquired by Facebook in 2013, says that its SDKs are used by more than 800 million active app-device pairs per month. By open sourcing those SDKs, Parse believes it can help developers facing challenges similar to those it faced. Specifically, according to Parse, "We’ve had to figure out a way to make a public-facing API easy to understand and use, but continue shipping features fast without breaking any existing functionality. To solve this, we structured our public API as a facade for internal code and functionality that could be consistently changing."

  • A word to the Wise…

    I have been recently reminded that while it may be hard enough to discuss the role and importance of communities for Free and Open Source Software, it is equally important to understand the complexities and the challenges that a Free and Open Source Software foundation has to meet.

  • Mozilla’s self-destruct course continues: major add-on compatibility changes announced

    Mozilla announced major upcoming changes to Firefox add-ons on the official Add-ons Blog today. These changes affect add-on developers and Firefox users alike, and will have a major effect on add-on compatibility and permissions.

  • Holes found in Pocket Firefox add-on

    Information security man Clint Ruoho has detailed server-side vulnerabilities in the popular Pocket add-on bundled with Firefox that may have allowed user reading lists to be populated with malicious links.

    The since-patched holes were disclosed July 25 and fixed August 17 after a series of botched patches, and gave attackers access to the process running as root on Amazon servers.

    Ruho says the bookmarking app functioned as an internal network proxy and subsequent poor design choices meant he could glean information on users including IP address data and the URLs customers saved for later reading. Adding redirects meant he gained access to the etc/passwd file.

  • Intel and Others Lead Massive New Funding Round for Mirantis

    It was just last October that I put up a post noting that Mirantis, which has steadily remained a nimble player in the OpenStack cloud computing arena, had nailed down a massive $100 million Series B funding round led by Insight Venture Partners. The financing was billed then as the largest Series B open source investment in history.

  • Intel backs OpenStack’s Mirantis with $100 million
  • Intel puts engineering and financial muscle behind OpenStack with $100m Mirantis funding boost

    The OpenStack open-source cloud-computing platform stands to gain more enterprise features thanks to a major financial and engineering deal between Intel and Mirantis.

  • Airbnb’s pricing algorithm and Aerosolve, its open-source machine learning tool

    Dan Hill, product lead at Airbnb, wrote the company’s pricing algorithm after the British-based rival startup he cofounded, Crashpadder, was acquired by Airbnb, the short-term rental giant, a few years ago.

  • Open vSwitch 2.4.0 Available
  • Open source part of Poland’s animal tracking project

    Poland’s Agency for Restructuring and Modernisation of Agriculture (ARMA) wants to modernise its animal identification and tracking system. The new solution is required to use Zabbix, an open source solution for IT security monitoring.

  • DataLook Hosts #openimpact to Encourage Replication of Civic Good Open Source Projects
  • Port of Rotterdam preparing for annual World Port Hackaton

    On September 4-5, the Port of Rotterdam is to hold the third edition of what has now become its annual World Port Hackaton. Hackers, programmers, stakeholders and enthusiasts are invited to attend the two-day event and join the teams. Together they will work on concepts and prototypes that deploy new technologies and (open) data, aiming to strengthen the safety, sustainability and competitiveness of the port.

  • FPGAs get into open source virtual reality eco

    Fully upgradable virtual reality headset, the Open-Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) Hacker Development Kit is now powered by Xilinx FPGAs. Buyers of this kit are provided with modules based platform, positioning and head tracking device, a display, and double lens optics.

  • PHP 7 drops first release candidate

    Faster PHP is approaching. PHP 7.0.0, which has been promoted as a much quicker upgrade to the server-side scripting language, has just gone into a release candidate stage, bringing its general availability even closer to fruition.

  • Infinity

    I’m writing a replacement for libthread_db. It’s called Infinity.

  • We’re still catching up to Perl

    That’s from a great little article by Chromatic about modern Perl in the latest issue of PragPub. The article goes in to discuss a number of other strengths of Perl, such as its strong community dedication to testing across numerous architectures, services for understanding package dependencies (that sound like they go beyond anything presently available for Ruby), and legendary standards of documentation.

  • Government seeks open standards feedback

    The government has launched a consultation on how best to proceed with several open standards proposals that will support inter-connected systems and more cost efficient digital transformation across Whitehall.

  • UK launches its next OGP Action Plan

    Open policy making, Open Data and international cooperation are three pillars that UK Minister for the Cabinet Office Matt Hancock wants to be included in the 2015 UK Action Plan, according to a speech given by the minister to mark the launch of a new Open Government Partnership (OGP) action plan (Transcript is accessible on the gov.uk website).

  • Flash is dying a death by 1,000 cuts, and that's a good thing

    Adobe’s Flash, hated the world over for slowing down computers, containing more holes in security than swiss cheese and stubbornly being the video carrier of choice until recently, is dying.

    Video players are migrating to other systems, even if Microsoft’s Silverlight isn’t much better. HTML5-based video and animations are becoming mainstream, and uploaders and other more advanced web-based features can now be replaced with code that doesn’t rely on Flash.

  • Kill Flash? Be careful what you wish for

    Back when Steve Jobs launched the first salvo in the war against Adobe Flash, declaring in no uncertain terms that the iPhone would never support the ubiquitous Web media framework, the anti-Apple crowd was much amused. No one is laughing now -- least of all the many IT vendors that have built their management interfaces in Flash, for whom the death of Flash poses huge challenges.

    At the time, Jobs seemed to be climbing out on a limb. But eventually, everyone came to see how painful it was to support Flash on mobile devices, and how much better HTML5 was at delivering the same basic functionality. Developers began skipping over Flash and going with alternative technologies so that they could support mobile and desktop clients with the same codebase.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • John McAfee: McAfee antivirus is one of the worst products on the planet
  • Highway to hack: why we’re just at the beginning of the auto-hacking era

    Imagine it’s 1995, and you’re about to put your company’s office on the Internet. Your security has been solid in the past—you’ve banned people from bringing floppies to work with games, you’ve installed virus scanners, and you run file server backups every night. So, you set up the Internet router and give everyone TCP/IP addresses. It’s not like you’re NASA or the Pentagon or something, so what could go wrong?

    That, in essence, is the security posture of many modern automobiles—a network of sensors and controllers that have been tuned to perform flawlessly under normal use, with little more than a firewall (or in some cases, not even that) protecting it from attack once connected to the big, bad Internet world. This month at three separate security conferences, five sets of researchers presented proof-of-concept attacks on vehicles from multiple manufacturers plus an add-on device that spies on drivers for insurance companies, taking advantage of always-on cellular connectivity and other wireless vehicle communications to defeat security measures, gain access to vehicles, and—in three cases—gain access to the car’s internal network in a way that could take remote control of the vehicle in frightening ways.

  • backdooring your javascript using minifier bugs

    In addition to unforgettable life experiences and personal growth, one thing I got out of DEF CON 23 was a copy of POC||GTFO 0x08 from Travis Goodspeed. The coolest article I’ve read so far in it is “Deniable Backdoors Using Compiler Bugs,” in which the authors abused a pre-existing bug in CLANG to create a backdoored version of sudo that allowed any user to gain root access. This is very sneaky, because nobody could prove that their patch to sudo was a backdoor by examining the source code; instead, the privilege escalation backdoor is inserted at compile-time by certain (buggy) versions of CLANG.

    That got me thinking about whether you could use the same backdoor technique on javascript. JS runs pretty much everywhere these days (browsers, servers, arduinos and robots, maybe even cars someday) but it’s an interpreted language, not compiled. However, it’s quite common to minify and optimize JS to reduce file size and improve performance. Perhaps that gives us enough room to insert a backdoor by abusing a JS minifier.

IBM adds Java to Bluemix for open source agility

Filed under
Server
OSS

How Linux was born, as told by Linus Torvalds himself

Filed under
Linux

Many people have read that post by Linus Torvalds in the comp.os.minix newsgroup on Usenet, or at least heard about it. Many more are aware of how that (free) operating system ended up taking over vast swathes of the computing world, and becoming both "big" and "professional." But what about before that famous moment? What were the key events that led to Linus creating that first public release of Linux?

Read more

Also: 24 years young: The best of Linux is yet to come

Happy 24th birthday, Linux kernel

LinuxCon 2015 in Seattle: It's all about the servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Then again, I always have a good time at Linux conferences. Whether they be the more community-driven events like the Southern California Linux Expo and LinuxFest Northwest or the more company-run expos like SUSECon and LinuxCon, these moments give me an opportunity to, quite simply, be around Linux nerds. Lots and lots of Linux nerds. These are my people.

Read more

Why is Linux So Great? Because It’s Open Source!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

What can’t Linux do? Nowadays you hear Linux powering just about any device imaginable — all the way from dime-sized computers via the Raspberry Pi all the way to most of the top 100 supercomputers in the world. We interact with it daily, whether it be on our personal computers, Android devices, Steam boxes (gaming), flight entertainment systems, web servers that power behemoths such as Google, Facebook, and Wikipedia, or more.

Read more

Zorin OS 10 Core - A good OS if you're coming from a heavy Windows background

Filed under
Reviews

Zorin OS Zorin OS is a GNU/Linux distribution that attempts to mimic the appearance of the Microsoft Windows operating system. I gave it a go roughly about a year and eight months ago (Zorin OS 8 Core) and my general impression was that it succeed in doing so, meaning that it was quite appealing in the eyes of a Microsoft Windows user.

Read more

OpenSUSE 13.2 on Lenovo G50 - Bald and beautiful

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

So this time around, the grade is going to be much lower. About 6.5/10. SUSE, please, you're better than that.

Read more

Collabora contributions to Linux Kernel 4.2

Filed under
Linux

A total of 63 patches were contributed upsteam by Collabora engineers as part of our current projects.

In the ARM multi_v7_defconfig we have the addition of support for Exynos Chromebooks, all options that had a tristate Kconfig option were added as module. After this change it was found that a few drivers weren’t working properly when built as module, so this was fixed. This work was done by Javier Martinez.

Read more

KDE Ships Plasma 5.4.0, Feature Release for August

Filed under
KDE

Tuesday, 25 August 2015. Today KDE releases a feature release of the new version of Plasma 5.

This release of Plasma brings many nice touches for our users such as much improved high DPI support, KRunner auto-completion and many new beautiful Breeze icons. It also lays the ground for the future with a tech preview of Wayland session available. We're shipping a few new components such as an Audio Volume Plasma Widget, monitor calibration tool and the User Manager tool comes out beta.

Read more

The Open Source Greatness of Linux

Filed under
-s

Ubuntu grabbed a large portion of the headlines today with Canonical's decision to abandon its paid software for desktops to concentrate on mobile devices. The Everyday Linux User reviewed Mageia 5 and Distrowatch.com has added "Release Model" to their database search options. Elsewhere, Danny Stieben said Linux is so great because it's Open Source and Munich is consdiering switching back to Linux on some machines because folks said there were no text editors, Skype support, or office suites installed. All this and more in today' Linux news round-up.

Read more

Thunderbird 38.2.0 Finally Arrives in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical just announced that a number of Thunderbird vulnerabilities have been closed in Ubuntu 15.04, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 12.04, which also updates the version of the browser to 38.2.0.

Read more

Subversion Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu OSes

Will Android Pay launch TOMORROW? McDonald's accidentally leaks release date…and it's weeks earlier than expected

Filed under
Android

Android Pay will give millions of people a new way to buy goods and services using their phones.
It was thought the payment system would launch alongside Google’s Marshmallow operating system, expected in October, but a leaked document suggests it could launch as soon as tomorrow.
However, other details in the document have since been proved to be inaccurate so it is unclear how reliable the leak is.

Read more

New wave of Android Wear watches aims to make up for lost time

Filed under
Android

Can't get enough of smartwatches? Well, a whole new batch is on its way.

Asus, Huawei, LG and Motorola will introduce their newest smartwatches next week at the IFA electronics trade show in Berlin, according to people familiar with the companies' launch plans. The devices will all run Google's Android Wear software, which was created to power wearable products like smartwatches.

Read more

Compare PDF Files With DiffPDF In Ubuntu Linux, Debian, Fedora & Other Derivatives

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos


Compare PDF Files With DiffPDF In Ubuntu Linux, Debian, Fedora & Other Derivatives

DiffPDF is  a small but useful tool that compares two PDF files and let you know the differences. This easy to use tool is free for Linux. If you often read books then you can compare for changes in the paragraph and other deep aspects. Let's see how to install and useDiffPDF in Linux distributions including UbuntuDebian, PCLinuxOS and Fedora.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

No, Canonical Is Not Killing the Ubuntu Software Center

Filed under
Ubuntu

We wrote a couple of weeks ago about the poor state of the Ubuntu Software Center, but it looks like other publications took this little too far. No, Canonical is not killing the Ubuntu Software Center, it's just evolving.

Read more

Linus Torvalds: Security is never going to be perfect

Filed under
Linux
Security

One of the best kept secrets at this week’s LinuxCon was the presence of Linus Torvalds. I’ve never not seen Linus at any of the LinuxCons I’ve attended since 2009, whether in Europe or North America, but no matter who you asked, the answer was, “He’s not here.” This morning, though, a little bird sang that the surprise guest for the upcoming keynote was none other than Torvalds.

Read more

Also: ​Securing the Internet: Let's Encrypt to release first security certificates September 7

Linux Foundation to Launch New Security-Focused Badge Program for Open-Source Software

The open source movement needs folk songs

Filed under
OSS

So if you have a musical bent, try composing an open source folk song. It's fine to be silly, too. Surprise us with what you make. Share your story and your song(s) right here on Opensource.com

If you compose the right song, you'll move the open source movement forward. School children may sing your song from coast to coast. Uhm, that might not happen too much with my own songs, but it could well happen for YOUR song.

Read more

Leftovers: Debian

Filed under
Debian
  • Tor-enabled Debian mirror

    During Jacob Applebaum's talk at DebConf15, he noted that Debian should TLS-enable all services, especially the mirrors.

    His reasoning was that when a high-value target downloads a security update for package foo, an adversary knows that they are still using a vulnerable version of foo and try to attack before the security update has been installed.

  • Updates to the sources.debian.net editor

    Debconf is a great opportunity to meet people in real life, to express and share ideas in a different way, and to work on all sort of stuff.

  • Debian/TeX Live complete update
  • Thanks Debian

    Regardless, my contributions to Debian were never noteworthy so it’s also not that big of a deal. I just need to close cycles myself and move forward, and the ten year anniversary looked like a significant mark for that.

  • Finally, systemd!

    Even though Debian has moved to systemd as default a long while ago now, I've stayed with sysv as I have somewhat custom setups (self-built trimmed down kernels, separate /usr not pre-mounted by initrd, etc.).

  • remove systemd for the love of Yog-Sothoth already
Syndicate content