Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2017 - 12:00am
Story Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:59pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:58pm
Story Q4OS 1.8.2 Is the First Linux OS to Be Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 "Jessie" Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:57pm
Story OSS in the Back End Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:56pm
Story Puppy Linux Fork Quirky 8.1.6 "Xerus" Is Built From Ubuntu 16.04 Binary Packages Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:56pm
Story Red Hat Financial News Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:32pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 11:15pm
Story Terrible Ideas in Git Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:48pm
Story RADV Improved Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2017 - 10:46pm

New User Distros, Powered By Linux, No Opera for You

Filed under
-s

There are many companies who use or offer Linux and today Linux and Ubuntu rounded up 10 of the biggest. Elsewhere, Jack Wallen offered his suggestions for which distros might suite particular users of certain other operating systems. From Windows 7 to Mac, he found an Ubuntu-derivative for each. Yep, "there's a distribution for everyone," as long as it's Ubuntu. OMG!Ubuntu! reported today that Opera won't be providing new conceptual browser to Linux users, because they claim it's being developed "just for fun." Remember who else once said that? In other news, Canonical today plugged Dell's new Ubuntu laptops, Ubuntu Budgie announced a wallpaper contest, and MakeUseOf made use of Linux versus Windows today to illustrate how easy it can be to switch.

Read more

What Is Conky And How To Configure Conky On Ubuntu 16.04

Filed under
Linux

Conky is a free system monitor tool for the X window system on Linux. It is able to monitor many system variables including CPU status, swap space, temperatures, disk storage, processes, network interfaces, battery status and a host of others and then display the information on your desktop. It can also display other things like time, calendars weather and the like. All these are available via themes with which Conky works.

Read<br />
more

Debian vs. Ubuntu Standoff – Comparing the Top Linux Solutions

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Debian and Ubuntu both have fan bases that continue to advocate the superiority of their selected solution, but what is really different between them? In this article we will take a look at how both Debian and Ubuntu have been maintaining a steady position since the early days and how even to this day they are regarded as top solutions that provide some of the most trustworthy, efficient services.

Read more

Security News

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Friday
  • New Windows backdoor targets intelligence gathering

    New versions of the MM Core Windows backdoor are being used to provide a channel into victims' machines for the purpose of intelligence gathering, according to Carl Leonard, principal security analyst at Forcepoint Security Labs.

    The new versions were found by members of the Forcepoint investigations team.

    MM Core, which is also known as BaneChant, is a file-less advanced persistent threat which is executed in memory by a downloaded component. It was first reported in 2013 with the version 2.0-LNK and used the tag BaneChant in the network request sent to its command-and-control centre.

    A second version, 2.1-LNK, found shortly thereafter, had the network tag StrangeLove.

    Forcepoint researchers Nicholas Griffin and Roland Dela Paz, whose write-up on MM Core was provided to iTWire, said the two new versions they had found were 2.2-LNK (network tag BigBoss) and 2.3-LNK (SillyGoose).

  • Implementing Medical Device Cybersecurity: A Two-Stage Process

    Connectivity is ubiquitous – it’s moved beyond an overhyped buzzword and become part of life. Offering ever-advancing levels of access, control, and convenience, widespread connectivity also increases the risk of unauthorised interference in our everyday lives.

    In what many experts believe was a world first, manufacturer Johnson & Johnson recently issued a warning to patients on a cyber-vulnerability in one of its medical devices. The company announced that an insulin pump it supplies had a potential connectivity vulnerability. The wireless communication link the device used contained a potential exploit that could have been used by an unauthorised third party to alter the insulin dosage delivered to the patient.

  • Dockerfile security tuneup

    I recently watched 2 great talks on container security by Justin Cormack from Docker at Devoxx Belgium and Adrian Mouat from Container Solutions at GOTO Stockholm. We were following many of the suggestions but there was still room for improvement. So we decided it was good time to do a security tuneup of our dockerfiles.

  • FTC Sues D-Link For Pretending To Give A Damn About Hardware Security

    If you've been paying attention, you've probably noticed that the so-called Internet of Things isn't particularly secure. Hardware vendors were so excited to market a universe of new internet-connected devices, they treated things like privacy, security, and end-user control as afterthoughts. As a result, we've now got smart TVs, smart tea kettles, WiFi-connected barbies and all manner of other devices that are not only leaking private customer data, but are being quickly hacked, rolled into botnets, and used in historically unprecedented new, larger DDoS attacks.

    This isn't a problem exclusive to new companies breaking into the IoT space. Long-standing hardware vendors that have consistently paid lip service to security are fueling the problem. Asus, you'll recall, was dinged by the FTC last year for marketing its routers as incredibly secure, yet shipping them with easily-guessed default username/login credentials and cloud-based functionality that was easily exploitable.

    The FTC is back again, this time suing D-Link for routers and video cameras that the company claimed were "easy to secure" and delivered "advanced network security," yet were about as secure as a kitten-guarded pillow fort. Like Asus, D-Link's hardware also frequently ships with easily-guessed default login credentials. This frequently allows "hackers" (that term is generous since it takes just a few keystrokes) to peruse an ocean of unsecured cameras via search engines like Shodan, allowing them to spy on families and businesses in real time.

Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • SteamVR support for Linux looks like it's getting close

    Thanks to a Twitter tip we have word that it looks as if SteamVR support for Linux might finally be close.

  • Valve May Be Moving Closer With Their VR Linux Support

    It looks like Valve may be moving closer to debut their Linux VR support, which they demonstrated at the 2016 Dev Days and we've known they've been working on further -- including improvements to AMDGPU/RadeonSI/RADV.

  • Early Access survival game 'Rust' gains Vulkan support in a pre-release

    When they do manage to get it fixed up enough to run on Linux, I will give it a go and note some thoughts on it.

  • Rust Game Now Supports Vulkan Renderer

    Not to be confused with Rustlang, the game called Rust now has a Vulkan renderer enabled.

    For those unfamiliar with this early-access game on Steam, as self-described on its product page, "The only aim in Rust is to survive. To do this you will need to overcome struggles such as hunger, thirst and cold. Build a fire. Build a shelter. Kill animals for meat. Protect yourself from other players, and kill them for meat. Create alliances with other players and form a town. Whatever it takes to survive."

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Driver Lands, Premiering With Mesa 17.0

    In time for this weekend's feature freeze of Mesa 17.0, the Etnaviv Gallium3D driver has landed in Mesa Git after years of work on this reverse-engineered, open-source driver stack.

  • Intel ANV Vulkan Driver Lands Last Minute HiZ Improvements

    Some more exciting last minute work landing in Mesa Git before this weekend's Mesa 17.0 branching are the potentially performance-improving HiZ work within the Intel Vulkan driver.

  • Google releases 'Draco' 3D graphics open source compression library on GitHub

    Google is a significant contributor to the open source community. This is notable, as the company is wildly successful and its products are used by many. It incorporates open source code in its offerings, and then contributes back too. The search giant's visibility lends credibility to open source ideology.

    Today, Google announces yet another open source project. Called "Draco," it is a compression library designed for 3D graphics. The project can dramatically reduce the size of 3D graphic files without significant visual impact to the person viewing.

  • Introducing Draco: compression for 3D graphics

    3D graphics are a fundamental part of many applications, including gaming, design and data visualization. As graphics processors and creation tools continue to improve, larger and more complex 3D models will become commonplace and help fuel new applications in immersive virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Because of this increased model complexity, storage and bandwidth requirements are forced to keep pace with the explosion of 3D data.

  • Google Announces "Draco" For 3D Graphics Compression

    Google's Chrome Media team has developed Draco as an open-source compression library designed for 3D graphics.

  • Fedora 25 Switching Over To Using GLVND For Mesa, Happier NVIDIA Driver Installation

    A Mesa update coming down the pipe for Fedora 25 Linux users will see GLVND support enabled by default.

    GLVND, of course, being the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch library. This is the NVIDIA-led effort that was also supported by upstream Mesa/X.Org developers for in effect a "new OpenGL Linux ABI" for allowing multiple Linux OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system. This makes things much easier than having different drivers overwriting the libGL files, complications with driver installation/uninstall, etc. It was long overdue but finally was seeing upstream support in 2016.

  • Wayland 1.13 Planned For Release Next Month

    Wayland 1.13 has been in development since September while the plans today were firmed up for releasing it in February.

  • Tegra/Nouveau Render-Only Gallium3D Support
  • Building Mesa from source, a guide

    If you are using Mesa (FOSS OpenGL/Vulkan drivers on Linux), you can be in situation when it introduces some new features upstream, but it didn't make it into your distribution yet and it can take quite a long time for that to happen. Certain games can become playable with that change, or it can be a performance optimization that speeds up already working games, or may be you simply want to test the newest Mesa itself - either way, you might be interested in running the latest development version of Mesa for various reasons. At the same time you don't want to mess up your system with an unstable graphics stack.

Linux Kernel News and Linux Foundation Projects

  • Laptop Mode Tools 1.71

    I am pleased to announce the 1.71 release of Laptop Mode Tools. This release includes some new modules, some bug fixes, and there are some efficiency improvements too. Many thanks to our users; most changes in this release are contributions from our users.

  • Laptop-Mode-Tools 1.71 Adds VGA Switcheroo Support, Kbd-Backlight

    For those using Laptop-Mode-Tools to conserve power consumption when running on battery or using it to be more power efficient on your desktop or server, a new version is now available.

    Laptop Mode Tools 1.71 adds new modules for vgaswitcheroo and kbd-backlight. This package update also revives the Bluetooth module, has some wireless/WiFi changes, AC/battery determination improvements, fixes, and other smaller improvements.

  • Amdocs Joins Forces with Linux Foundation to Accelerate OpenECOMP Adoption in Open Source
  • Amdocs Joins Forces with Linux Foundation to Accelerate OpenECOMP Adoption in Open Source

    Amdocs to contribute key modules to OpenECOMP to help accelerate the industry uptake of common SDN and NFV standards and faster service delivery architectures

    ST. LOUIS, Jan. 13, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Amdocs (NASDAQ:DOX), the leading provider of digital customer experience solutions, today announced that it will partner with the Linux Foundation to accelerate the global adoption of the open source Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) platform. Hosted by the Linux Foundation, this new project will make ECOMP open source available to service providers and cloud developers in 2017.

  • Amdocs Will Contribute Modules to OpenECOMP
  • Amdocs Aids Linux Foundation in Open Source ECOMP
  • Blockchain will secure global derivatives trading

    Starting next year, one of the major providers of financial-markets infrastructure will begin using blockchain, the cryptographic software underlying bitcoin and other digital currencies, to help settle post-trade transactions in credit derivatives. It’s the first use of the breakthrough technology to undergird the global financial system.

    The Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation, in a release this week, said it would “re-platform” its existing Trade Information Warehouse, which automates record keeping and payment management for about 98 percent of all credit derivative transactions globally — or about $11 trillion a year.

  • Why IBM CEO Ginni Rometty Believes in Blockchain

    Close attention has been paid in the wake of Donald Trump’s historic victory in the US presidential election to bitcoin, which rose on safe-haven demand in reaction to Trump’s victory and uncertainty in global markets also related to Brexit’s looming impact.

Many IT Pros Ask for Linux and More Server News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
  • Many IT Pros Ask for Linux and Cloud Training

    A significant share of technology professionals said they encounter barriers in getting necessary, regular training on Linux and cloud systems, according to a recent survey from the Linux Academy. Very few reported that their IT department has such an advanced grasp of these topics that it requires little training. Many, in fact, would like to get up to speed on Linux, DevOps and the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. However, time constraints, budget limitations and inadequate employer support are keeping these workers from getting the training they need. It doesn't help that, thanks to the shortage of available talent, it's taking two months or longer to fill open job vacancies that demand Linux or cloud skills. "The advancement of [open source and cloud] technologies is clearly outpacing the pool of professionals who are able to service and manage them," said Anthony James, founder of the Linux Academy. "By the time professionals receive the training they need, the technologies have progressed, making their training obsolete. This underscores not only the need for access to timely and affordable training, but also for companies to further invest in their employees' skills." Nearly 890 IT professionals took part in the research.

  • New framework uses Kubernetes to deliver serverless app architecture

    A new framework built atop Kubernetes is the latest project to offer serverless or AWS Lambda-style application architecture on your own hardware or in a Kubernetes-as-a-service offering.

    The Fission framework keeps the details about Docker and Kubernetes away from developers, allowing them to concentrate on the software rather than the infrastructure. It's another example of Kubernetes becoming a foundational technology.

  • A Story of a Microservice: Lessons from the Trenches

    A lot has been written about microservices over the years, but we feel that not many of these articles have presented real-life and long-term experiences of building and maintaining microservices. In this blog post we aim to address this shortcoming.

    Microservices are loosely coupled, independently deployable applications that are focused on fulfilling a single cohesive responsibility. The microservices mindset encourages continuous deployment cycles, promotes choosing the right tool for each job, and helps to build a highly fault-tolerant architecture that can be evolved and scaled on a fine-grained level. Implementing a microservice architecture requires a substantial investment in an automated deployment infrastructure.

Ashley Williams on npm

Filed under
Software
  • State of the Union: npm

    Ashley Williams kicked off her colorful "paint by number" keynote at Node.js Interactive by explaining that npm is actually a for-profit company. Npm makes money by selling its enterprise services and, apart from the amounts required to run the everyday operations of a regular company, its revenue is invested in running the npm registry.

  • KEYNOTE: State of the Union: npm by Ashley Williams, npm

    In this keynote, Ashley Williams, Developer Community and Content Manager, discusses how npm works as a service and shares some of the remarkable numbers associated with the registry.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • VidCutter is an Open-Source Video Trimmer app

    I’m pretty capture happy with my Nexus 5X because a) the camera is decent and Cool live with 6 very comical cats…

    Sometimes I take videos but only want to use a specific part of it, be it to turn into an animated gif or quickly share it with folks online.

    This is where video trimming apps come in handy.

  • The elusive Palm OS 5.5 Garnet emulator for Windows/Linux

    From top left to bottom right, you're looking at Palm OS 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 5.3 (a Palm Zire ROM), 5.4.9 (the last released version of Palm OS available on real devices), and Palm OS 6.1.0 Cobalt (the last version of Palm OS; no 6.x device has ever been released). This is a pretty complete collection, and while it doesn't contain every released version of Palm OS, it covers the most important ones, and provides a great overview of the development of the operating system.

  • Opera Won’t Be Bringing New Browser ‘Neon’ to Linux

    Opera Software debuted an all-new concept browser called Opera Neon yesterday.

    Neon is fast, blingy, and a little bit gimmicky, but does some neat new stuff that has gotten a lot of people quite excited.

    Sadly, Neon wasn’t made available to download on Linux.

    And now we find out that it won’t be.

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.15 released with support for autostart and more
  • Rogue Wave Software's TotalView for HPC and CodeDynamics

    New versions of not just one but two dynamic analysis tools from Rogue Wave Software were unveiled recently to pleased developers everywhere. Upgraded TotalView for HPC and CodeDynamics, versions 2016.07, improve the diagnosis and correction of bugs, memory issues and crashes at execution.

More OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Pantek, Metisentry merge to build on open source IT expertise

    Two local IT services firm that specialize in open source technologies have merged.

  • Hedge fund firm Man AHL says open sourcing software helps attract best developer talent

    A commonly held view of hedge funds is of secretive organisations that jealously guard the tools that make them money. Contrary to this is the trend among certain firms to open source their software and invite collaboration from the developer community.

    Firms that have blazed a trail in the open sourcing of this sort of technology are the likes of AQR, which kick-started the Pandas libraries project, and Man AHL, which has open-sourced its Arctic data storage system.

    Arctic powers Man AHL's vast financial market data store and is built on top of the open-source no-SQL database MongoDB. The Arctic codebase was made available on GitHub back in 2015.

  • Software Company Anahata Announces Management Restructuring
  • Software Company Anahata Appoints Ambarish Mohan as the Head of Open Source
  • Apache Beam Graduates to Help Define Streaming Data Processing

    Open-source effort originally developed from code contributed by Google moves from the Apache incubator to become a Top Level Project

    The open-source Apache Beam project hit a major milestone on Jan.10, graduating from the Apache Incubator and officially becoming a Top Level Project. Beam is a technology that provides a unified programming model for streaming as well as batch data processing.

    The Apache Incubator is an entry point for new projects into the Apache Software Foundation (ASF), with graduation marking a level of maturity and adherence to established policies and processes.

    "Graduation is an exciting milestone for Apache Beam," Davor Bonaci, Vice President of Apache Beam, said in a statement. "Becoming a top-level project is a recognition of the amazing growth of the Apache Beam community, both in terms of size and diversity."

  • Yahoo Open Sources Tool for Continuous Delivery at Scale

    For the past year, we've taken note of the many open source projects focused on Big Data and infrastructure technology hat have been contributed to the community. Some of these are real difference makers--strong enough for new startup companies to align around them with business models focused on them. While the Apache Software Foundation has has announced many of these, some of the bigger tech companies are contributing as well.

    Yahoo recently open sourced a distributed “publish and subscribe” messaging system dubbed Pulsar that’s capable of scaling while protecting low latencies. Yahoo uses Pulsar to drive several of its own in-house applications. And now, Yahoo is open sourcing Screwdriver.cd, an adaption of its Continuous Delivery build system for dynamic infrastructure.

  • Mozilla and Market Researchers Herald Big IoT Future

    Early last year, Mozilla announced that the Internet of Things (IoT) will be the next big opportunity for its open source software platform. "The Internet of Things is changing the world around us, with new use cases, experiences and technologies emerging every day," wrote officials in a post. "As we continue to experiment in this space, we wanted to take a moment to share more details around our approach, process and current projects we’re testing."

    We've heard similar predictions from several companies, and now two recent studies are confirming that the Internet of Things (IoT) is poised for huge growth.

    Studies from International Data Corporation (IDC), and one from the U.S. Department of Commerce (DoC), confirm that worldwide IoT spending is set to skyrocket.

  • The State of Open Source Licensing [Ed: Stop relying on Black Duck for information; was created as anti-GPL company.]

    Copyleft licenses, for example, of which the GPL is the most notable variant, are committed to the freedom of the source code. Code governed by a copyleft license asks for reciprocity from consumers; if changes to the code base are made and distributed (we’ll come back to that word), they must be released and shared under the original terms. Permissive licenses, on the other hand, are built around freedom for the developer: permissively licensed assets impose few if any restrictions on downstream users, and require no such reciprocity. Both communities are strongly committed to freedom; the difference lies in what, precisely, is kept free.

  • Renault Is Planning To Release Its Hardware As An Open-Source Automotive Platform

    Auto maker Renault is developing an open-source platform based on the Twizy that is a compact and lightweight electric vehicle with the bodywork parts removed. The POM will be made available to start-ups, independent laboratories, private customers and researchers, enabling third parties to copy and modify existing software in order to create a customizable electric vehicle. Renault has partnered with B2B company OSVehicle to develop and sell this open-source platform to the community. Bringing together entrepreneurs, developers, designers, and engineers, they will make it easier for them to build, share, distribute and modify the hardware designs of electric vehicles.

More Raspberry Pi, Linux Pressure, Plasma 5.9

Filed under
-s

Jonathan Riddell announced the latest KDE Plasma today to "kick off 2017 in style." While announcing Plasma 5.9 Beta, Riddell assured users that 5.8 LTS would continue to receive bug fixes. Weird thing to say for a developmental release. Relatedly, neon 20170112 was uploaded but not announced. In other news, Mint 18.1 took another one on the chin today at The Reg mainly for it's old base and Update Manager. Jamie Watson tested other distributions on his Raspberry Pis, this time Fedora, Manjaro, and Ubuntu MATE and Robin "Roblimo" Miller said Windows users should be grateful to Linux. That followed a similar themed story from the other day where a developer claims Valve Linux choice forced Microsoft to beef up Windows gaming support. It was another interesting day in the land of The Penguin.

Read more

Wine 2.0 RC5

Filed under
Software

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • FSFE: H2020 funded software should be free

    Software that is developed in research projects funded by the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 programme should be published under a free software licence, says the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). The advocacy group wants to know how much of the H2020 budget is spent on paying for proprietary software licences.

  • Social network App.net to shut down, open-source its platform

    The next (and last) step for App.net is to offer all its infrastructure as open source. Previously, the company open-sourced key projects that ran on top of the service, such as the alpha microblogging client, but not its full underlying platform. One possibility is for App.net to go in the same direction as Diaspora—with the ability to be self-hosted, in much the same manner as a WordPress installation.

  • Open Source Helps Drive Citizen Engagement With Minimal Cost

    Open source software drives innovation. People with great ideas have the ability to develop software and make it available for others to use. Agencies receptive to using open source software can take advantage of this innovation, learning new ideas about how technology is used and deployed.

    For example, DevOps is a relatively new field in the federal market and there are number of open source tools that enable its implementation that will automate the task of code verification, automated testing, deployment, etc. thereby increasing adoption.

    A typical starting point for developing a citizen engagement platform is a web content management solution (WCMS). An engagement platform developed on a WCMS allows an organization to create and publish content that is engaging to the audience and available to anyone on any device.

    Some technologies, such as Drupal, have also extended their capability to integrate other open source technologies like JavaScript frameworks and search engines. They can be further leveraged to create the ideal experience that is needed for today’s audiences that use varying devices. Further, this content can be revised as often as needed without any need for IT involvement.

  • D-Wave open sources quantum app development software

    To foster a quantum software development ecosystem, the company created qbsolv, which lets developers build higher-level tools and applications leveraging the D-Wave quantum systems without the need to understand the complex physics of quantum computers.

  • A 5 year old girl vs. CoderDojo

    In early December'16 together with my 5 year old daughter we visited an introductory workshop about the Hello Ruby book and another workshop organized by Coder Dojo Bulgaria. Later that month we also visited a Robo League competition in Sofia. The goal was to further Adriana's interest into technical topics and programming in particular and see how she will respond to the topics covered and the workshops and training materials format in general. I have been keeping detailed notes and today I'm publishing some of my observations.

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

OpenELEC 7.0 Gets First Point Release, Improves SolidRun's CuBox-i4Pro Booting

Filed under
OS

The last days of 2016 brought us the OpenELEC 7.0 operating system for embedded devices, such as Raspberry Pi, which was based on the Kodi 16.1 open-source media center and allows users to transform those devices in HTPC (Home Theater PC) units.

Read more

AryaLinux 2017 Drops 32-Bit Support, Adds MATE 1.17 and Linux Kernel 4.9

Filed under
Linux

AryaLinux has received its first release in 2017, and it looks like it's a good one. AryaLinux is both a builder for those who want to create their own GNU/Linux distribution from scratch, and a computer operating system.

Read more

Best Linux Distributions for New Users

Filed under
Linux

Ah, the age-old question...one that holds far more importance than simply pointing out which Linux distribution is a fan-favorite. Why is that?

Let me set the stage: You have a user—one who has, most likely, spent the majority of their time in front of either a Windows or Mac machine—and they’ve come to you for an alternative. You want to point them in a direction that will bring about the least amount of hiccups along the way and highlight the power and flexibility of Linux.

Read more

Kdenlive 16.12.1 released with Windows version

Filed under
KDE

We are proud to announce the first maintenance release for the 16.12 cycle. Besides the usual bugfixes and usability improvements this release also marks the official release of the Windows port.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics: Nouveau, NVIDIA and More

Red Hat's OpenShift Container Platform openly shifts storage into the hands of devs

Enterprise Linux biz Red Hat has revised its OpenShift Container Platform to include support for dynamic storage provisioning in local and remote applications. The software is an on-premises platform-as-a-service product that allows organizations to run applications using Kubernetes orchestration and Docker containers. Read more

Mozilla rebrands with clever new logo and open source design principles

Mozilla is a very important organization for the open web. While Firefox's share of usage has not been lighting the world on fire lately, Mozilla is much more than just a web browser developer. It often fights for the rights of web users. Since it is a not-for-profit organization, you can be fairly confident that its intentions are pure. Read more

Open Source Serverless Computing Frameworks, and Why They Matter

Serverless computing is fast becoming one of the hottest trends in the channel since the cloud. What is the open source ecosystem doing to keep pace with the serverless trend, and why does it matter? Here's a look. Read more