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Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Some site news srlinuxx 2 01/11/2010 - 5:24pm
Blog entry Distribution Release - pclinuxos enlightenment 2010.11 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:22pm
Blog entry Maintenance Release - pclinuxos zen mini 2010.10 Texstar 05/11/2010 - 11:29pm
Blog entry KDE 4.5.4 now available for PCLinuxOS Texstar 02/12/2010 - 8:24pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS KDE Full and Mini ISOS updated to 2010.11 Texstar 25/11/2010 - 2:16am
Blog entry working quake 1 srlinuxx 25/11/2010 - 1:50am
Blog entry unreal gold install srlinuxx 24/11/2010 - 3:10am
Blog entry new quake 2 install srlinuxx 23/11/2010 - 7:41am
Blog entry PCLinuxOS 64-bit Texstar 19/11/2010 - 4:01pm
Blog entry GNOME 2.32.1 desktop updated for PCLinuxOS Texstar 19/11/2010 - 3:22am

Android: New Devices

Filed under
Android
  • ZTE launches crazy, foldable, dual-screened smartphone

    Budget Android company ZTE is launching what has to be its craziest-looking smartphone ever, the Axon M. The M looks like someone took a Nintendo DS, removed the controls, and stuck two big smartphone screens on each side.

    The Axon M is a whopping 12.1mm thick. A hinge runs along the long side of the phone, and it opens up, just like a Nintendo DS. On each side of the phone, you get a 5.2-inch, 1080p TFT LCD. Open the whole thing up, and when combined the screens sort of become a 6.75-inch, 8:9 aspect ratio, 1920x2160 display. I say "sort of" because of course there's a big seam down the middle.

  • Google's Pixel 2 Earns High Marks in Spite of Dull Design

    As Google's new Pixel 2 smartphones get ready to hit the shelves, reviews of the models have begun mushrooming online.

    While the new phones generally have received positive grades, many reviewers found the their design boring.

    "The Pixel 2 hardware is ho-hum," observed Patrick Moorhead, principal analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy.

  •  

  • Surprise! The Pixel 2 is hiding a custom Google SoC for image processing

OSS and Sharing Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • GMO Internet introduces open source KYC as blockchain project enters fifth phase
  • Eclipse Science Advances Open Source Technology for Scientific Research

    The Eclipse Science Working Group, a working group of the Eclipse Foundation, today announced the new releases of five open source projects used by the scientific research community to advance and simplify the software used by science projects, like genomic, astrophysics, nuclear simulations, etc. The new project releases are part of an annual release train that is managed by the Science WG.

  • Dmark East Africa to develop open source IT applications

    We have an operation around the region; in South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, Kenya and Rwanda. And this has exposed us to different levels of talent across the region.  As a result, we have come to a conclusion that Uganda has special talents in the area of information technology, specifically, product development or software engineering.

  • DevOps Jobs: 4 trends to watch
  • Amazon, PwC join campaign to bring open-source EMR to Puerto Rico in wake of Hurricane Maria

    The first phase of the campaign comprises immediate disaster response. The collaborators will deploy a version of the open-source cloud platform OpenEMR-Plus, which proved successful in response efforts after Hurricane Harvey in Houston. They will also provide supply chain assistance.

  • UK Startup Lifebit Builds on Popular Nextflow Open-Source Genomics Platform
  • Makerbot Labs Is One Step Toward Open Source 3D Printing

    3D printing feels a bit stuck. At the dawn of the 2010s, the device seemed destined to reimagine the creative process, putting the power of additive manufacturing within anyone's grasp. But trend has gone cold since reaching its popular zenith in 2013. While people continue to create amazing things with 3D printing, the "one in every household" promise has been put on temporary—or possibly permanent—hold.

    But the leader of the once great 3D printing revolution hasn't gone away quietly. In fact, it's done the opposite. Makerbot, the Brooklyn-based startup that sold its first printers back in 2009, is launching a brand new platform, Makerbot Labs, to help turn its 3D printing community into super-users, able to access parts of the printer that were otherwise inaccessible. Makerbot describes this new platform as a place, built for creators, who want to experiment with 3D printing but still have the bedrock of the platform to fall back on if need be.

  • IEEE to develop standard for automotive Ethernet of over 1 Gbps

    Industry body IEEE and the IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) announced the formation of a task force to develop IEEE P802.3ch—Standard for Ethernet physical layer specifications and management parameters for greater than 1 Gbps automotive Ethernet. The new standards development project aims to meet the demand for higher speed Ethernet in the automotive environment to support ongoing technological developments, such as connected cars, advanced driver assisted systems and infotainment systems.

CMS: Mass.gov Moves to Drupal, Voyager 1.0 is Out

Filed under
OSS
Web

Chrome and Mozilla

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web
  • Google Quietly Releases Chrome 62 to Stable Channel for Linux, Mac, and Windows

    Google quietly promoted the Chrome 62 web browser to the stable channel today for desktops, including Mac, GNU/Linux, and Microsoft Windows platforms.

  • Chrome 62 Promoted To Stable

    Google has released Chromium/Chrome 62 as the latest update to its widely-used web browser.

  • Chrome Working On JPEG Encode Accelerator With VA-API/V4L2 Support

    Landing in the Chromium browser code-base this morning is a JPEG encode accelerator interface.

  • Mozilla brings Microsoft, Google, the W3C, Samsung together to create cross-browser documentation on MDN

    Community contributions are at the core of MDN’s success. Thousands of volunteers have helped build and refine MDN over the past 12 years. In this year alone, 8,021 users made 76,203 edits, greatly increasing the scope and quality of the content. Cross-browser documentation contributions include input from writers at Google and Microsoft; Microsoft writers have made more than 5,000 edits so far in 2017. This cross-browser collaboration adds valuable content on browser compatibility and new features of the web platform. Going forward, Microsoft writers will focus their Web API documentation efforts on MDN and will redirect relevant pages from Microsoft Developer Network to MDN.

  • A Week-Long Festival for Internet Health

    Says Mark Surman, Mozilla’s Executive Director: “The Internet is layered into our lives like we never could have imagined. Access is no longer a luxury — it’s a fundamental part of 21st century life. A virus is no longer a nuisance consigned to a single terminal — it’s an existential threat that can disrupt hospitals, governments and entire cities.”

    But much of the Internet’s best nature is flourishing, too. Each day, new communities form despite members being separated by whole continents. Start-ups and artists have access to a global stage. And open-source projects put innovation and inclusion ahead of profit.

FUD and Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft never disclosed 2013 hack of secret vulnerability database

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Hackers broke into Microsoft's secret, internal bug-tracking database and stole information related to vulnerabilities that were exploited in later attacks. But the software developer never disclosed the breach, Reuters reported, citing former company employees.

In an article published Tuesday, Reuters said Microsoft's decision not to disclose details came after an internal review concluded the exploits used in later attacks could have been discovered elsewhere. That investigation relied, in part, on automated reports Microsoft receives when its software crashes. The problem with that approach, Reuters pointed out, is that advanced computer attacks are written so carefully they rarely cause crashes.

Reuters said Microsoft discovered the database breach in early 2013, after a still-unknown hacking group broke into computers belonging to a raft of companies. Besides Microsoft, the affected companies included Apple, Facebook, and Twitter. As reported at the time, the hackers infected a website frequented by software developers with attack code that exploited a zero-day vulnerability in Oracle's Java software framework. When employees of the targeted companies visited the site, they became infected, too.

Read more

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Plasma 5.11 – Keep the momentum going

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Just a few short days ago, the KDE team released Plasma 5.11, the latest edition of this desktop environment, plied with a range of bug fixes as well as some new features. Reason enough to celebrate, but even more so when you consider the fact that Plasma has been slowly, steadily – and consistently – improving over the past few years.

For me, the culmination of this effort is my great satisfaction with Plasma – epitomized in the shape and form of Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zoltan, including the most excellent twining of the distro with my HP Pavilion laptop. And on this very machine, I will be testing the KDE neon live edition, furnished with the latest desktop version. So let’s see what it does.

Read more

Also: GCompris at KDE-edu sprint 2017

Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth: IoT, Ubuntu and the yogurt of the future

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical founder and CEO Mark Shuttleworth is one of the most prominent people in open source software.

Ubuntu, the GNU/Linux-based operating system that he helped birth in 2004 is now one of the best-known open source projects in the world, accounting for a vast proportion of the Linux VMs in the public cloud and huge numbers of connected devices.

Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Launches Tomorrow with GNOME 3.26, but You Can Still Use Unity

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche shared today the last blog article for the development cycle of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, which is expected to launch tomorrow, October 19.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 17.10 is back on track with GNOME: Here's why that's a good thing

KDE Applications 17.12 GNU/Linux Software Stack Set to Arrive on December 14

Filed under
KDE

Now that the KDE Applications 17.08 software suite got its second point release, it's time for the KDE developers to concentrate their efforts on the next major update, KDE Applications 17.12.

Read more

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 16

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

All good things must come to an end, however, in that particular case, it’s rather a beginning! We are indeed almost done in our road to Artful, which means that 17.10 is just around the corner: official Ubuntu 17.10 release is due tomorrow. Of course, it doesn’t mean we stop right away working on it: you will have bug fixes and security updates for 9 months of support! It’s thus time to close this series on Artful, and for this, we are going to tackle one topic we didn’t get to yet, which is quite important approaching the release: upgrading from a previous Ubuntu release! For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

Read more

Trying Out System76's Pop!_OS Ubuntu-Based Operating System

Filed under
Ubuntu

Besides Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" launching tomorrow, System76 is also expected to issue their first official release of the Ubuntu-derived Pop!_OS operating system they plan to begin shipping on their laptops/desktops. Curious about their modifications to Ubuntu 17.10, I decided to give the latest snapshot of it a ride.

For those that missed the earlier news this summer, back in June is when System76 announced Pop!_OS as the Linux distribution to be shipped on their future PCs/laptops. System76 had been shipping stock Ubuntu installations on their systems since its founding in 2005, but with Ubuntu shifting from Unity back to GNOME Shell and other changes, System76 found it time to give their own take on a Linux desktop OS.

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Rugged, Linux-driven HMI touch panel has built-in 4G

Filed under
Linux

MYIR has launched a $239, HMI touch panel with a 7-inch resistive screen that runs Linux on a TI AM335x, and offers -10 to 70°C support and a 4G LTE module.

MYIR’s Linux-based “MY-EVC5100S-HMI” touch-panel computer is designed for HMI systems in industrial control, manufacturing, vending, food and beverage, automation, and utilities applications. MYIR has already used the platform to develop a billing display application for electric vehicle charging pile stations.

Read more

Parrot Security OS 3.9 Ethical Hacking & Penetration Testing Distro Now in Beta

Filed under
Security

The Parrot Project began work on a new version of their Linux-based ethical hacking and penetration testing operating system, Parrot Security OS 3.9, and they recently put out a call for testing.

Read more

GNOME 3.28 to Bring Support for Hybrid GPU Systems to Its Mutter Window Manager

Filed under
GNOME

The development cycle of the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment kicked off with a bunch of updates for various of the core components and apps, including Mutter and GNOME Shell.

Read more

Also: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Will Add Google Safe Browsing Support to Epiphany Web Browser

Blockchain and the Web Are Coming Together, Says Berners-Lee

Filed under
Web

Sir Tim Berners-Lee is a famous computer scientist and academic who invented the World Wide Web in 1989—so when he talks about new technologies it’s worth paying attention.

Today, one of the topics on his mind is blockchain, a revolutionary way of creating permanent, tamper-proof records across a disparate network of computers.

Blockchain is most famously associated with the digital currency bitcoin but the technology is increasingly being used for record keeping by banks and retailers. It will also come to be used by more ordinary citizens in the near future, says Berners-Lee.

Read more

Control Or Consensus?

Filed under
OSS
Legal

In a recent conversation on the Apache Legal mailing list, a participant opined that “any license can be Open Source. OSI doesn’t ‘own’ the term.” He went on to explain “I could clone the Apache License and call it ‘Greg’s License’ and it would be an open source license.”

As long as the only people involved in the conversation are the speaker and people who defer to his authority, this might be OK. But as soon as there are others involved, it’s not. For the vast majority of people, the term “open source license” is not a personal conclusion resulting from considered evaluation, but rather a term of art applied to the consensus of the community. Individuals are obviously free to use words however they wish, just like Humpty Dumpty. But the power of the open source movement over two decades has arisen from a different approach.

The world before open source left every developer to make their own decision about whether software was under a license that delivers the liberty to use, improve and share code without seeking the permission of a rights holder. Inevitably that meant either uncertainty or seeking advice from a lawyer about the presence of software freedom. The introduction of the open source concept around the turn of the millennium solved that using the crystalisation of consensus to empower developers.

By holding a public discussion of each license around the Open Source Definition, a consensus emerged that could then by crystalised by the OSI Board. Once crystalised into “OSI Approval”, the community then has no need to revisit the discussion and the individual developer has no need to guess (or to buy advice) on the compatibility of a given license with software freedom. That in turn means proceeding with innovation or deployment without delay.

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GIMP, More Awesome Than I Remember

For what seems like decades, GIMP (Graphic Image Manipulation Program) has been the de facto standard image editor for Linux. It works well, has many features, and it even supports scripting. I always have found it a bit clumsy, however, and I preferred using something else for day-to-day work. I recently had the pleasure of sitting at a computer without an image editor though, so I figured I'd give GIMP another try on a non-Linux operating system. See, the last time I tried to use GIMP on OS X, it required non-standard libraries and home-brew adding. Now, if you head over to the GIMP site, you can download a fully native version of GIMP for Windows, OS X and Linux. Read more

Linux 4.13.9

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