Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 20 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU: guix, gnucash, and glibc Roy Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 5:02pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 4:53pm
Story Zenkit Is Now Available as a Snap for Ubuntu and Other GNU/Linux Distributions Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 3:02pm
Story 6 Industrial Touch-Panel Computers Based on the Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 2:56pm
Story TDF announces LibreOffice 5.4.7 Roy Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 1:04pm
Story Snyk and Black Duck Attack Free/Open Source Software for Profit Again Roy Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 11:25am
Story AsteroidOS 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 2 17/05/2018 - 11:15am
Story Games: Tales of Maj'Eyal, Stardew Valley, Unforeseen Incidents, Albion Online, Super Hyperactive Ninja Roy Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 10:56am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 10:43am
Story AMD Ryzen 5 2600 / Ryzen 7 2700 Benchmarks On Linux, 9-Way Ubuntu CPU Comparison Rianne Schestowitz 17/05/2018 - 10:36am

Open source vs free software: what's the difference?

Filed under
GNU
OSS

February 2018 marked the 20th anniversary of the official recognition of open source software. However, the debate regarding the differences, if any, between 'open source' and 'free' software continues unabated.

Richard Stallman, who is credited with developing the concept of 'free software' in the 1980s, says the term 'free software' has nothing to do with cost. For him, free software is a social movement, a philosophy, while open source is a development methodology.

Read more

Termux turns Android into a Linux development environment

Filed under
Android
Linux

Termux is an Android terminal emulator and Linux environment. What that means in practice is that you can install Termux on most Android devices and do almost anything you would do in a full Linux development environment on that device. That all sounds cool, but you're probably asking yourself, "why would I want to code on my phone on a touch screen? That just sounds awful." Start thinking more along the lines of tablets paired with a keyboards or Chromebooks that can now run Android applications. These are very cheap devices that can now be used to introduce people to Linux hacking and development. I know many of us in the Linux community started out by installing Linux on an old PC.

Read more

Top 8 open source AI technologies in machine learning

Filed under
OSS

Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are quickly transforming almost every sphere of our lives. From how we communicate to the means we use for transportation, we seem to be getting increasingly addicted to them.

Because of these rapid advancements, massive amounts of talent and resources are dedicated to accelerating the growth of the technologies.

Here is a list of 8 best open source AI technologies you can use to take your machine learning projects to the next level.

Read more

Software: Calamares on Krypton, Tuptime, jm-shell

Filed under
Software
  • Calamares on Krypton

    Calamares is a Linux system installer (and some day, a FreeBSD system installer, but that is a long way off) which is distro- and desktop-independent. OpenSUSE Krypton is a live CD and installer for the latest-and-greatest .. but it already has an installer, so why try Calamares on it?

    Well, sometimes it’s just to show that a derivative could be made (there is one, called GeckoLinux), or to experiment with tools and configurations.

    Calamares has a script called deploycala.py, which like every gaping huge security hole is expected to be downloaded from the Calamares site, then run. It is recommended to only use this in a VM, with a live CD / ISO image running. What the script does is install a basic dev environment for Calamares, install up-to-date dependencies, and then it builds and installs Calamares. That then gives you a way to experiment, installing with Calamares from an already-set-up live CD.

  • Tuptime – A Tool To Report The Historical And Statistical Running Time Of Linux System

    Beginning of this month we written an article about system uptime that helps user to check how long your Linux system has been running without downtime? when the system is up and what date. This can be done using 11 methods.

    uptime is one of the very famous commands, which everyone use when there is a requirement to check the Linux server uptime.

  • jm-shell – A Highly Informative and Customized Bash Shell

    jm-shell is a free open source, small, highly informative and customized Bash shell, that gives you a great wealth of information about your shell activity as well as certain useful system information such as system load average, battery status of laptops/computers and much more.

    Importantly, unlike Bash which only stores unique commands in a history file, for searching previously run commands – jm-shell records each and every shell activity in a log file.

Security: EFF Repeated and Refuted, Canonical Removes More Blobs, More Updates

Filed under
Security

IWD 0.2 Released for Linux, Microsoft Desperate to Stop GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • IWD 0.2 Released For Advancing Intel's Linux WiFi Daemon

    Last week marked the release of IWD 0.2, the second public release of this WiFi daemon for Linux systems destined as a replacement for WPA Supplicant.

    It was back at the end of 2016 that the code was made public while now there is finally the second version release. IWD 0.2 brings support for several new features as well as several bug fixes.

  • Microsoft's Linux Adoption: How Things Change [Ed: Surely Matt Hartley understands how Embrace, Extend, Extinguish works, no? Seems so...]

    When Microsoft began promoting themselves as the company that "Loves Linux," some Linux community members were skeptical. Some even believed that Microsoft's move to embrace Linux was based on the once tried and true “embrace, extend, extinguish” approach to technology we've seen in the past. And this concern is based on a hisory of the past use of this strategy.

    While it's a valid to worry about Microsoft's motivation behind their self-claimed embrace of Linux, I think Microsoft's motivation is more selfish than a desire to extinguish Linux would suggest. Based on their activity with cloud computing and more recently, the Internet of Things (IoT), I believe Microsoft is looking to utilize technology that has proven itself in those fields - Linux is that technology.

    Linux is a means to an end for Microsoft. It allows the software giant to participate with greater efficiency by utilizing existing toolsets. The official reasoning that Microsoft offers is Linux and open source in general provides a great ecosystem. An ecosystem Microsoft is now (apparently) motivated to give back code to. My own concern, however, is how much of this code being given back upstream is good for the community.

     

    The concern that I have is I believe the code being sent upstream must always benefit Microsoft directly or indirectly in some way. I haven't seen any examples of Microsoft providing code that benefits projects that are unrelated to their own efforts. Perhaps I missed something along the way, but due to their anti-FoSS history, it's unreasonable to expect Microsoft to give back to projects that might not benefit them directly or indirectly. And yes, Microsoft's sponsorship of various Linux conventions is an example of indirect benefit to Microsoft.

OSS: Open OnDemand, LikeCoin, Mozilla Development

Filed under
OSS
  • Ohio Supercomputer Center upgrades open-source HPC access portal

    Developers of the Ohio Supercomputer Center's innovative web-based portal for accessing high performance computing services have recently upgraded its capabilities.

    OSC recently announced the release of Open OnDemand 1.3, the first version using its new RPM Package Manager, or Red Hat Package Manager, a common standard for distributing Linux software.

    Open OnDemand is an open-source version of OSC OnDemand, the center's online, single-point-of-entry application for HPC services. Open OnDemand is a project funded by the National Science Foundation to develop a widely shareable web portal that provides HPC centers with advanced web and graphical interface capabilities.

  • LikeCoin, a cryptocurrency for creators of openly licensed content

    Conventional wisdom indicates that writers, photographers, artists, and other creators who share their content for free, under Creative Commons and other open licenses, won't get paid. That means most independent creators don't make any money by publishing their work on the internet. Enter LikeCoin: a new, open source project that intends to make this convention, where artists often have to compromise or sacrifice in order to contribute, a thing of the past.

    The LikeCoin protocol is designed to monetize creative content so creators can focus on creating great material rather than selling it.

  • The Cherry on Top: Add Value to Existing Risk Management Activities With Open Source Tools

    Telling people about the virtues of open source security tools is like selling people on ice cream sundaes: It doesn’t take much of a sales pitch — and most people are convinced before you start.

    It’s probably not surprising that most security professionals are already using open source solutions to put a cherry on top of their existing security infrastructure. From Wireshark to OpenVAS and Kali Linux, open source software is a key component in many security practitioners’ arsenal.

  • Deep Dive: New bookmark sync in Nightly

    For the last two years, the Firefox Sync team has been hard at work improving bookmarks on all our platforms. Last year, we added support for uploading bookmarks to Firefox for iOS, and made change tracking more durable on Android. Today, we’d like to tell you about our latest project to overhaul bookmark sync in Firefox for Desktop.

  • Firefox 61 Beta 6 Testday, May 18th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, May 18th, we are organizing Firefox 61 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Accessibility Inspector: Developer Tools, Audio Context using sampleRate and Web Compatibility.

Linux Foundation and ONF on Free Software in Networking

Filed under
OSS
  • The edge defines experience, but can’t be done without open source – ONF

    For years the industry has been focusing on the core network, but the tides are beginning to turn, with the edge taking centre stage. While this is a promising development, the economics are simply not supporting the ambition.

    “Edge processing is vital,” said Timon Sloane, VP of Marketing & Ecosystem at ONF. “When we started talking about this it was a novel idea, but the industry is just catching on now. The subscriber edge is where experience is created.”

    This focus on the edge of the network is a huge opportunity, but also presents a massive problem. The core network is easy. It is one place, easy to manage, but the edge consists of thousands of sites which are usually located within three miles of the customer. Most of the time these sites are windowless, concrete bunkers, with little or no lighting, representing 80% of operator CAPEX. Upgrading these sites is critical to the performance of the network, but is a time consuming and expensive job.

  • The First 10 Years of Software Defined Networking

    In 2008, if you wanted to build a network, you had to build it from the same switch and router equipment that everyone else had, according to Nick McKeown, co-founder of Barefoot Networks, speaking as part of a panel of networking experts at Open Networking Summit North America.

    Equipment was closed, proprietary, and vertically integrated with features already baked in, McKeown noted. And, “network management was a dirty word. If you wanted to manage a network of switches, you had to write your own scripts over a lousy, cruddy CLI, and everybody had their own way of doing it in order to try to make their network different from everybody else’s.”

Server Hype Waves: Serverless, Kubernetes, Docker

Filed under
Server
  • Red Hat's Serverless Blockchain Future Powered by Open Source Innovation [Ed: "Serverless" is a myth. Serverless means servers you do not control at all. Back to mainframes and worse.]

    On the final day of the Red Hat Summit last week, Red Hat CTO Chris Wright presided over the closing keynotes where he outlined how his company innovates and hinted at multiple future product developments.

  • Kubernetes as a Service Built on OpenStack

    In this video from the 2018 Swiss HPC Conference, Saverio Proto from SWITCH presents: Kubernetes as a Service Built on OpenStack.

  • Docker is the dangerous gamble which we will regret

    Docker strikes me as a direction that one day will be seen as a mistake. The strongest arguments for it are that it might be a standard if it can mature, and it offers a bandaid for many of the other failures that the tech industry is currently suffering from. Those are bad reasons to love Docker.

PacVim and 5 Emacs modes for writers

Filed under
Development
Software
  • PacVim – A CLI Game To Learn Vim Commands

    Howdy, Vim users! Today, I stumbled upon a cool utility to sharpen your Vim usage skills. Vim is a great editor to write and edit code. However, some of you (including me) are still struggling with the steep learning curve. Not anymore! Meet PacVim, a CLI game that helps you to learn Vim commands. PacVim is inspired by the classic game PacMan and it gives you plenty of practice with Vim commands in a fun and interesting way. Simply put, PacVim is a fun, free way to learn about the vim commands in-depth. Please do not confuse PacMan with pacman (the arch Linux package manager). PacMan is a classic, popular arcade game released in the 1980s.

  • 5 Emacs modes for writers

    Not all writers work within the confines of a word processor. More than a few of us tap out words in a humble (and sometimes not so humble) text editor.

    When you find a text editor that works for you, and works the way you want it to, you tend to hold onto it like that beaten up leather jacket, like that dog-eared book, or like that collection of old vinyl records.

    For some, that editor is vi or Vim. For others, it's Nano or Atom. For me, that editor is Emacs. Why? Mainly because of its variety of modes, including some crafted especially for writers.

    Here's a look at five Emacs modes that writers will find useful.

Programming: Python and MapTool

Filed under
Development
  • Plotting the Jet Stream, or Other Winds, with ECMWF Data

    I've been trying to learn more about weather from a friend who used to work in the field -- in particular, New Mexico's notoriously windy spring. One of the reasons behind our spring winds relates to the location of the jet stream. But I couldn't find many good references showing how the jet stream moves throughout the year. So I decided to try to plot it myself -- if I could find the data. Getting weather data can surprisingly hard.

    In my search, I stumbled across Geert Barentsen's excellent Annual variations in the jet stream (video). It wasn't quite what I wanted -- it shows the position of the jet stream in December in successive years -- but the important thing is that he provides a Python script on GitHub that shows how he produced his beautiful animation.

  • An introduction to the Pyramid web framework for Python

    In the first article in this four-part series comparing different Python web frameworks, I explained how to create a To-Do List web application in the Flask web framework. In this second article, I'll do the same task with the Pyramid web framework. Future articles will look at Tornado and Django; as I go along, I'll explore more of the differences among them.

  • MapTool: A robust, flexible virtual tabletop for RPGs

    When I was looking for a virtual tabletop for role-playing games (RPGs), either for local play or for playing on a network with family and friends around the world, I had several criteria. First, I wanted a platform I could use offline while I prepped a campaign. Second, I didn't want something that came with the burden of being a social network. I wanted the equivalent of a Sword Coast campaign-setting boxed set that I could put on my digital "shelf" and use when I wanted, how I wanted.

Scientific Linux 7.5 Officially Released Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5

Filed under
Red Hat

The developers of Scientific Linux, a free and open-source clone of Red Hat's RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) operating system, released a new update to the latest Scientific Linux 7 series.

Now that Red Hat released the final Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 update to its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating system series, the open-source and free clones have started popping up, beginning with CentOS Linux 7.5 (1804) and now continuing with Scientific Linux 7.5.

However, like in the case of CentOS Linux 7.5, don't expect to see any major changes or new features included in the Scientific Linux 7.5 release, which appears to be only a small update to the Scientific Linux 7 operating system series adding a few updated components and minor improvements.

Read more

Open Hardware: RISC-V and 3-D Printing

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Develop your Linux apps on this RISC-V board

    A funny thing happened on the way to a writing up this hardware announcement. Going through all the cool features (which I’ll get to in a minute), I realized that this announcement is really about the software, whether that was the intention or not.

  • RISC-V Benchmarks Of SiFive's HiFive Unleashed Begin Appearing

    Over the past week, benchmarks of this first RISC-V development board have begun appearing on OpenBenchmarking.org by the Phoronix Test Suite. Here are some of those initial benchmark numbers.

    SiFive's HiFive Unleashed as a reminder is the first RISC-V Linux development board and uses the Freedom U540 SoC. SiFive claims this is the "world's fastest RISC-V processor" and is in a 4+1 multi-core design with clock speeds up to 1.5GHz, features a 2MB L2 cache, Gigabit Ethernet, 64-bit DDR4 with ECCm and is manufactured on a 28nm process. The HiFive Unleashed development board has 8GB of DDR4, 32MB quad SPI flash, microSD card for storage, and more via SiFive.com.

  • paradiddle, an open-source 3D-printed drumming prosthesis by dominic siguang ma

    ‘paradiddle’, an essential rudiment of drum beats, is an open-source 3D-printed upper-extremity prosthesis designed specifically for amputee drummer by young china-born and USA-based designer dominic siguang ma. to develop unique features that would allow the drummer to play more intuitively and comfortably, the designer worked with renowned amputee drummer greg anton.

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 To Offer A KDE Plasma Desktop Option

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

The multimedia-focused Ubuntu Studio Linux distribution has used GNOME since its inception and while that is continuing for now, a sign of a possible shift is coming with Ubuntu Studio 18.10 to offer a KDE Plasma desktop option.

For this next Ubuntu Studio release, the GNOME Shell desktop will be their default environment but they are going to offer a KDE Plasma option -- the first time they have offered an alternate desktop option. They would like to make it an option to select at install-time what desktop is preferred by the user, but due to size/packaging constraints, they may end up offering two separate ISOs.

Read more

Direct/source: Plans for Ubuntu Studio 18.10 – Cosmic Cuttlefish

GPU/Graphics: OpenCL, AMD, X.Org

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • OpenCL 2.2 Sees A Maintenance Update With Document Clarifications, Bug Fixes

    While OpenCL 2.2 support by the major hardware vendors' drivers are sadly languishing, a new maintenance release of this year-old OpenCL standard was issued today to provide various bug fixes as well as documentation clarifications to the specification. Additionally, there is also an update to the OpenCL SPIR-V specification.

  • AMD's Compressonator 3.0 Brings Better Texture Compression

    AMD's GPUOpen team has released Compressonator 3.0, the latest major update to this tools collection for dealing with texture and 3D model compression and optimizations for Linux, macOS, and Windows.

    The Compressonator 3.0 release brings improved texture compression, mesh optimizations, mesh compression support, and other enhancements.

  • AMDKFD In Linux 4.18 Bringing Vega GPU Support

    The AMDKFD kernel driver in the upcoming Linux 4.17 has the long-awaited discrete Radeon GPU support working so it can be used with the ROCm/OpenCL compute user-space, but Vega GPU support wasn't ready for this release. Fortunately, it's ready for Linux 4.18.

  • Four Years After Launch, AMD Kaveri Sees Huge Performance Boost On Linux

    For those making use of AMD Kaveri APUs, the latest Linux graphics stack improvements will now yield much better performance -- up to twice as fast in some instances! Here are some benchmarks with Ubuntu 18.04 on the AMD A10-7870K.

  • X.Org Server 1.21 Opens For Development

    Following the long drawn out and feature-packed X.Org Server 1.20 cycle, the 1.21 window officially opened up today.

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat who continues serving as the X.Org Server release manager today did the post-1.20 version bump to begin allowing new feature material to land for this next cycle.

    For the time being xserver Git is living as version 1.20.99.1 and Adam's latest codename is "Carrot and Ginger Soup."

    No release plans have been posted yet, so it remains to be seen if 1.21 will aim to get back on a six-month release cadence like X.Org had been getting good at delivering on. Or if it will be like 1.20 where it was one and a half years in the making.

Games: Hyperspace Dogfights, Leisure Suit Larry, Phoenix Point

Filed under
Gaming

Fedora and Red Hat: GSoC, Fedora 28, Fedora Atomic 28, Red Hat Summit 2018

  • GSoC 2018: Kicking off the Coding

    It’s May 14, and this is when we officially start coding for GSoC, 2018 edition. This time, I would be working on improving the Fedora Community App with the Fedora project. This marks the beginning of a journey of 3 months of coding, patching, debugging, git (mess) and the awesome discussions with my mentors and the community.

    The Fedora App is a central location for Fedora users and innovators to stay updated on The Fedora Project. News updates, social posts, Ask Fedora, as well as articles from Fedora Magazine are all held under this app.

  • Fedora 28: Better smart card support in OpenSSH

    Smart card support was introduced around 2010 with OpenSSH 5.4. The inital scope was restricted to the RSA keys — the only supported key type at that time in OpenSSH — other than legacy DSA keys. Previously, users needed to specify the PKCS#11 driver for the smart card. Additionally, the OpenSSH client had to query the server with all the stored keys in the card, until an acceptable key was found. This slowed down authentication, and reveals public keys to the server that might not be necessary (e.g., if we have a single card with keys for distinct servers).

    Over the years, OpenSSH gained support for additional authentication keys, such as ECDSA and later EdDSA. However, the smart card subsystem has not changed much since the early days. Cards with ECDSA keys are not yet supported, and there is no option for the user to specify the key to use when connecting to a server. Fedora 28 addresses these limitations. This article describes these improvements, the background behind them, and how they can be used.

  • Moving to Fedora Atomic 28
  • Fedora BoF report from Summit 2018
  • PodCTL #35 – Kubernetes News & Events

    The end of April and early May is the heart of the Spring tradeshow season, and this year it was packed with Kubernetes events and news. We look back at the Kubernetes-related news and trends coming out of Cloud Foundry Summit, KubeCon/CloudNativeCon and Red Hat Summit.

  • Making the Operation of Code More Transparent and Obvious

    You can study source code and manually instrument functions as described in the “Use the dynamic tracing tools, Luke” blog article, but why not make it easier to find key points in the software by adding user-space markers to the application code? User-space markers have been available in Linux for quite some time (since 2009). The inactive user-space markers do not significantly slow down the code. Having them available allows you to get a more accurate picture of what the software is doing internally when unexpected issues occur. The diagnostic instrumentation can be more portable with the user-space markers, because the instrumentation does not need to rely on instrumenting particular function names or lines numbers in source code. The naming of the instrumentation points can also make clearer what event is associated with a particular instrumentation point.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Doxyqml 0.4.0

After almost two years, here comes a new version of Doxyqml, the QML filter for Doxygen. This new version adds a new command-line option: --namespace to wrap the generated C++ in a namespace, and makes the parser more robust. Nothing ground-breaking, but some nice changes nevertheless. What's interesting with this project is that I don't use it these days, but it still receives contributions from time to time. This puts me in the unusual position (for me) where most of my contributions to the project are reviewing code, cleaning things, a bit of infrastructure (I just added code coverage checks: 88%, not too bad) and release management. Surprisingly, I like doing this, I am happy to see this little tool remains useful enough that others keep it alive. Read more

Plasma 5.12.5, Applications 18.04.1 and Frameworks 5.46.0 by KDE now available in Chakra

On your next system upgrade you will receive all the latest versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to several other package updates. For more details and the full changelogs on KDE’s software releases, you can read the official announcements: Plasma 5.12.5 Applications 18.04.1 Frameworks 5.46.0 Other noteworthy package updates include wine 3.8, skypeforlinux 8.20.0.9 and pypy 6.0.0. Read more

SMTube review - Your train to Youtube

It's a no brainer. On the desktop, you go online, and you open a tab and you load Youtube, and then you play clips. But then, on mobile devices, you have dedicated applications, which usually offer a somewhat more efficient media experience. So, on the desktop, it's the browser way or the ... SMTube way? SMTube is a cross-platform Youtube player, which allows you to search and play videos from the popular media platform, with some additional search tweaks and filters, and extra download options, all this from the desktop, without having to keep a browser tab open. It's a convenient tool to use, and with the recent rewrite, it actually works, and it works fairly well. I decided to test to see what gives. [...] SMTube looks like a nice tool. It is not strictly necessary or needed, but it does allow you to have Youtube open and playing, even if you're not currently using your browser, i.e. you can use it like any other media player. This is nice, plus you get a clean and intuitive interface, decent search and filter options, and it's easy to change settings and configure additional players. You also have the option to download clips. I don't know where SMTube stands when it comes to Google, Youtube, but ordinary users will surely appreciate the extra flexibility they get with a media player rather than just a browser tab. Of course, you're not signed in, you don't get recommendations, comments or playlists, and such, so I guess there are benefits to going directly to Youtube. But if you're only after what Youtube can play without any socializing, SMTube is an excellent choice. It's had a rough ride, it never quite fully worked for me in my various distro reviews, but this new version is stable, robust and works well. At the very least, it's worth testing. Choo choo. Read more

GNOME Development/Developers

  • Nautilus Ability To Launch Binaries Or Scripts To Be Reverted, Might Be Implemented Differently
    It looks like the decision to remove the ability to run binaries and scripts from Nautilus file manager will be reverted. The change comes after some use cases appeared that the developers agreed they need to support, "especially for enterprise and content creators". One such use case that was mentioned as a reason for reverting this is a small "if then that" script for building HTML and PDF files, which uses Zenity to display a dialog, as well as notifications to display the progress. I find the use case being used as an example a bit weird because that's certainly not something common, like a self-extracting game script for instance.
  • Stickers in Riot
    The matrix.org protocol is flexible so this is a good example of how to add new features to the clients that uses matrix without the need to change the protocol. This is not a core feature because you can send images, but I think this is great and add a simple way to show reactions for the users, so as I was reading I thought that we can add this to Fractal, so I started to read how we can add support for this.
  • Talking at GPN 2018 in Karlsruhe, Germany
    Similar to last year I managed to attend the Gulasch Programmier-Nacht (GPN) in Karlsruhe, Germany. Not only did I attend, I also managed to squeeze in a talk about PrivacyScore. We got the prime time slot on the opening day along with all the other relevant talks, including the Eurovision Song Contest, so we were not overly surprised that the audience had a hard time deciding where to go and eventually decided to attend talks which were not recorded. Our talk was recorded and is available here.