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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Better Know a Blogger: SJVN on Linux, Microsoft, space roadsters, and more Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:48pm
Story Real-time Linux based automation controller supports up to 16 I/O modules Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 9:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 5:29pm
Story Devices/Embedded: Nintendo Switch, Advantech, Renesa, PocketBeagle Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 5:04pm
Story Patent Troll MPEG LA Wants People to Stay With MPEG Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 5:02pm
Story Graphics: glTF 2, Graphics Compiler, DRI3 Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:52pm
Story KDE: Plasma and Solus 4 Updates, Amarok Comes to Plasma 5 Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:48pm
Story How to make sense of the Apache 2 patent license Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:42pm
Story Canonical/Ubuntu: Minimalism, Unity, and Snapcraft Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:27pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2018 - 4:26pm

Programming/Development: BH 1.66.0-1, Data scientists, vi, Emacs and Compilers

Filed under
Development
  • BH 1.66.0-1

    A new release of the BH package arrived on CRAN a little earlier: now at release 1.66.0-1. BH provides a sizeable portion of the Boost C++ libraries as a set of template headers for use by R, possibly with Rcpp as well as other packages.

    This release upgrades the version of Boost to the Boost 1.66.0 version released recently, and also adds one exciting new library: Boost compute which provides a C++ interface to multi-core CPU and GPGPU computing platforms based on OpenCL.

  • Data scientist wanted: Must have Python, spontaneity not required

    The average salary offered to data scientists in the past year was £47,000, with Python being the most desirable programming language, according to an analysis of job ads.

    The assessment, carried out by listings site Joblift, looked at 8,672 data scientist vacancies posted in the UK over the last 12 months.

    It found that data science salaries have increased at 3 per cent a month, which is a percentage point higher than the UK job market as a whole.

  • Top 11 vi tips and tricks

    The vi editor is one of the most popular text editors on Unix and Unix-like systems, such as Linux. Whether you're new to vi or just looking for a refresher, these 11 tips will enhance how you use it.

  • How to create slides with Emacs Org mode and Reveal.js

    You've crafted each slide in your presentation. Now what? You'll want to generate the HTML version of your slide deck. To do that, press Ctrl+c Ctrl+e on your keyboard. This opens the Org mode export buffer. Next, type R+R. Emacs creates a single HTML file in the folder where you saved your slide file.

    Open that HTML file in a web browser. You can move through the slides by pressing the arrow keys on your keyboard.

  • Renesas Synergy Platform Boosts IoT Performance With IAR Systems Advanced Compiler Technology

Open source: why is it such a big deal?

Filed under
OSS

What is open source software (OSS)? OSS is any program, application, operating system that is released along with its source code so that you, the user, can change it at will. Or at least have the option to utilise the services of a vendor of your choice. The fact that any other type of software exists is itself strange: would you buy a car that is completely sealed off from repair? No access to the engine, the tail-lights, or the windshield wiper? Even the tyres? One and only one company — the manufacturer of the car — will be able to fix even the smallest problem. Would you buy such a vehicle? Forget buying, given the current competition in vehicles, such a product would not last in the market for even a week.

The fact that people are selling you software that you cannot take to another person to fix, re-package, assist in providing even basic upgrades is in itself wrong and the discussion should end right here, IMHO. But that is a whole different topic and best left to camp-fire discussions; we have neither the will nor the wherewithal to turn an entire industry on its head.

Read more

Security: Updates, Microsoft, Google, and Telegram

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Winter Olympics was hit by cyber-attack, officials confirm [Ed: This is a Microsoft Windows issue, but Bill Fates is paying The Guardian, so...]
  • Google Patches Chromebooks Against Meltdown/Spectre, Adds New Chrome OS Features

    Earlier this month, Google updated its Chrome OS computer operating system to stable version 64.0.3282.134 and platform version 10176.65.0, an update that's now available for most Chromebook devices.

    Besides the usual security improvements and bug fixes, the latest Chrome OS 64 release includes several new features that are worth mentioning, such as the ability to take screenshots by simultaneously pressing the Power and Volume Down buttons on your Chromebook with a 360-degree hinge.

  • Skype can't fix a nasty security bug without a massive code rewrite
  • Perfect Computer Security Is a Myth. But It’s Still Important [Ed: The "everything is broken" defeatism overlooks the coordinated vandalism done to put back doors in most things]

    Maybe you’ve heard it before: “Security is a myth.” It’s become a common refrain after a never-ending string of high-profile security breaches. If Fortune 500 companies with million dollar security budgets can’t lock things down, how can you?

    And there’s truth to this: perfect security is a myth. No matter what you do, no matter how careful you are, you will never be 100 percent safe from hackers, malware, and cybercrime. That’s the reality we all live in, and it’s important to keep this in mind, if only so that we can all feel more sympathy for victims.

  • Microsoft Fixes 50 Vulnerabilities In February’s Patch Tuesday Update

    Microsoft has released February’s cumulative updates for Windows 10, better known as Patch Tuesday. The reason why the update is worth getting is it comes with fixes for 50 vulnerabilities in various versions of Windows 10.

    As per the release notes, the software addressed as a part of the Patch Tuesday update are Windows OS, Microsoft Edge, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Office Services and Web Apps, and the JavaScript engine ChakraCore. In addition to security fixes, Microsoft has also made improvements to address minor glitches in Windows 10.

  • Telegram Zero-Day Vulnerability Lets Hackers Pwn Your PC to Mine Cryptocurrency

    A zero-day vulnerability was discovered by Kaspersky Lab in the Telegram Desktop app that could let hackers pwn your computer to mine for cryptocurrencies like Zcash, Monero, Fantomcoin, and others.

    Kaspersky Lab's security researchers say the zero-day vulnerability can be used to deliver multi-purpose malware to computer users using the Telegram Desktop app, including backdoors and crypto-cash mining software.

    The security company also discovered that hackers had actively exploited the vulnerability in the Telegram Desktop app, which is based on the right-to-left override Unicode method, since March last year, but only to mine cryptocurrencies like Fantomcoin, Monero, and Zcash.

OSI Joins UNESCO to Grow Open Source Community

Filed under
OSS

The FOSSASIA Summit 2018 takes place in Singapore from Thursday, March 22 – Sunday, March 25. Open Source contributors can now apply for a free ticket to the event, and accommodation throughout conference. In addition, you’ll be eligible to participate in: A featured workshops, the UNESCO hackathon, and celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the Open Source Initiative. All you have to do is convince us, that you are an awesome Open Source contributor and book your trip to Singapore!

Read more

Atom 1.24

Filed under
Software
  • Atom 1.24

    Atom 1.24 has been released on our stable channel and includes read-only TextEditors, asynchronous context menus, and automatic scrolling on folding and unfolding.

  • Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets Asynchronous Context Menus, Read-Only TextEditors

    GitHub updated today its open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor app to add asynchronous context menus, read-only TextEditors, and automatic scrolling on unfolding and folding.

    Atom 1.24 is now available for Linux, Windows, and macOS, bringing asynchronous context menus to no longer lock up the even loop on right-click and allow other rendering and processing operations to occur when the context menu is displayed, a new LanguageMode API, automatic scrolling when folding or unfolding, and read-only TextEditors.

    "Packages can apply a read-only attribute to TextEditors to disable input," says Ash Wilson in the release notes. "This is useful when you wish to display code with syntax highlighting and allow copying to the clipboard, but it doesn’t make sense for the user to be able to change it, for example because it’s code in your git history or it isn’t on your local drive."

Exo 0.12.0 Stable Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux

With full GTK+ 2 and 3 support and numerous enhancements, Exo 0.12.0 provides a solid development base for new and refreshed Xfce applications.

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Five noteworthy open source projects

Filed under
OSS

The open-source movement has gained momentum over the last few years. So much so that The Linux Foundation recently formed the LF Networking Fund (LFN) in an effort to place multiple open source networking projects under a single umbrella. These types of projects allow virtually anyone to make modifications, and potentially improve, software code through a process called upstreaming. Given the numerous open source projects available, however, choosing one to contribute to can feel overwhelming. To simplify matters, the following — though far from an exhaustive list — highlights some noteworthy open source projects.

Read more

Google Summer of Code 2018

Filed under
Development
Google
OSS

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider Is Coming to Linux and Mac, Ported by Feral Interactive

    Feral Interactive announced today that it started ported the Rise of the Tomb Raider dramatic action-adventure game featuring the gorgeous Lara Croft for the macOS and Linux platforms.

    Initially released in early November 2015 for Microsoft's Xbox 360 and Xbox One gaming consoles, and a year later for Sony's PlayStation 4 console, Rise of the Tomb Raider was available for the PC master race only on the Microsoft Windows operating system since January 2016.

    Using the latest Vulkan (on Linux) and Metal 2 API (on macOS) graphics technologies, the superb and thrilling Rise of the Tomb Raider adventure game is currently being ported by Feral Interactive, an UK-based video games publisher known for porting Tomb Raider 2013, to Mac and Linux platforms.

  • Farming sim 'Cattle and Crops' hits Steam Early Access, has Linux support

    If you're after a slightly more realistic farming sim, as in one that's not 2D pixel stuff, Cattle and Crops [Steam, Official Site] certainly seems interesting.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, I did look, but this might be the first "proper" farming sim to be made available on Linux. I didn't find anything else like it, so that's progress I guess. Earlier today, the game released on Steam and it's currently still in-development, so it's an Early Access title. The good news, is that Linux support is already there and it works reasonably well.

  • THQ Nordic now own Koch Media GmbH

    Not that it really means all that much for us, but interesting nonetheless, THQ Nordic has acquired Koch Media GmbH.

    Naturally, the announcements contain a lot of legal-speak, but some of it is quite interesting. THQ Nordic have actually put out a few Linux games like the revamp of Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, the updated Imperium Galactica II and the RPG Silver. They're also the publisher of games that support Linux like The Book of Unwritten Tales, This Is the Police, The Dwarves and a bunch more.

  • The Linux beta of EVERSPACE has been updated with Unreal Engine 4.17 and bug fixes

    The unofficial Linux beta of space shooter EVERSPACE [Steam] has been updated again, this time it brings in an updated Unreal Engine 4.17 and bug fixes.

  • WHAT THE GOLF? A silly physics-based anti-golf game will support Linux

    What do you get when you attempt to turn everything into Golf? Silly physics-based anti-golf game WHAT THE GOLF? [Official Site, Fig Campaign] aims to answer that question. It's a game aimed at people who might find normal Golf a bit boring, like me.

    It's being developed by developer Triband, who are also working on "Keyboard Sports - Saving QWERTY" [Steam] which will also have Linux support that will release sometime this year.

  • Have you played HyperRogue? A non-Euclidean roguelike that combines a free and paid model

    HyperRogue [Official Site, Steam, itch.io] is a non-Euclidean roguelike that has not only messed with my brain, it also combines a free and paid development model with code that's under the GPL.

  • Fantasy Farming: Orange Season, a farm-life RPG recently added Linux support

    While searching for other farming sims while covering Cattle and Crops, I ended up coming across Fantasy Farming: Orange Season [Steam, Official Site, itch.io] and it just recently added Linux support. It's being developed by Hudell Tales, which is made up on a single developer.

    Note: It's currently in Early Access so it's not finished—expect bugs.

Ryzen 5 2400G Radeon Vega Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Gaming Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Here are our initial performance figures for the Vega graphics found on the newly-released Ryzen 5 2400G "Raven Ridge" APU under Linux and testing both OpenGL and Vulkan graphics benchmarks. CPU tests as well as benchmarks of the Ryzen 3 2200G under Linux are forthcoming on Phoronix.

Read more

Red Hat: Openwashing the Brand, Financial News, and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Events: FOSDEM, ATO, ELC, Ceph Day Germany

Filed under
OSS
  • Inductive Bias: FOSDEM 2018 - recap

    Too crowded, too many queues, too little space - but also lots of friendly people, Belgian waffles, ice cream, an ASF dinner with grey beards and new people, a busy ASF booth, bumping into friends every few steps, meeting humans you see only online for an entire year or more: For me, that's the gist of this year's FOSDEM.

    Note: German version of the article including images appeared in my employer's tech blog.

    To my knowledge FOSDEM is the biggest gathering of free software people in Europe at least. It's free of charge, kindly hosted by ULB, organised by a large group of volunteers. Every year early February the FOSS community meets for two one weekend in Brussels to discuss all sorts of aspects of Free and Open Source Software Development - including community, legal, business and policy aspects. The event features more than 600 talks as well as several dozen booths by FOSS projects and FOSS friendly companies. There's several FOSDEM fringe events surrounding the event that are not located on campus. If you go to any random bar or restaurant in Brussels that weekend you are bound to bump into FOSDEM people.

  • As open source grows, Open Source 101 event offers you a chance to join the crowd

    In 2018 it’s easy to believe everyone understands open source and has a firm grasp of the basic processes and tools. It can be a surprisingly nuanced topic, though, and after 10 years of hosting open source events I and my associates can tell you most current and future technologists do not.

    But why is this important? Why should technologists and would-be technologists care?

  • Last Chance to Save $150 on ELC + OpenIoT Summit North America
  • Ceph Day Germany 2018 - Follow-Up

    Last week the Ceph Day Germany took place at Deutsche Telekom in Darmstadt. Around 160 people took part in the event and attended the talks of the 13 speakers over the day.

Rugged module and dev kit run Linux on octa-core Renesas SoC

Filed under
Linux

Emtrion’s Linux-friendly “emCON-RZ/G1H” module features an octa-core Renesas RZ/G1H SoC, up to 32GB eMMC, dual CAN interfaces, and extended temperature support, and is available with a carrier board.

Like iWave’s Qseven form factor iW-RainboW-G21M-Q7 computer-on-module, Emtrion’s emCON-RZ/G1H taps the Renesas RZ/G1H SoC (model R8A7742), which combines 4x 1.4GHz Cortex-A15 cores, 4x 780MHz Cortex-A7 cores and a 3D-ready Imagination Technologies PowerVR G6400 GPU clocked at 520MHz. Emtrion usually works with NXP or TI SoCs, and in the past has dabbled in Atmel, as in its circa-2014, ATSAMA5D36 based SBC-SAMA5D36.

Read more

Meanwhile in RISC-V:

Security: Telegram, Bounties and More

Filed under
Security
  • Telegram zero-day let hackers spread backdoor and cryptocurrency-mining malware

    A zero-day vulnerability in Telegram Messenger allowed attackers to spread a new form of malware with abilities ranging from creating a backdoor trojan to mining cryptocurrency.

    The attacks take advantage of a previously unknown vulnerability in the Telegram Desktop app for Windows and were spotted being used in the wild by Kaspersky Lab.

    Researchers believe the Russian cybercriminal group exploiting the zero-day were the only ones aware of the vulnerability and have been using it to distribute malware since March 2017 -- although it's unknown how long the vulnerability had existed before that date.

  • More Than 4,000 Government Websites Infected With Covert Cryptocurrency Miner

    The rise of cryptocurrency mining software like Coinhive has been a decidedly double-edged sword. While many websites have begun exploring cryptocurrency mining as a way to generate some additional revenue, several have run into problems if they fail to warn visitors that their CPU cycles are being co-opted in such a fashion. That has resulted in numerous websites like The Pirate Bay being forced to back away from the software after poor implementation (and zero transparency) resulted in frustrated users who say the software gobbled upwards of 85% of their available CPU processing power without their knowledge or consent.

    But websites that don't inform users this mining is happening are just one part of an emerging problem. Hackers have also taken to using malware to embed the mining software into websites whose owners aren't aware that their sites have been hijacked to make somebody else an extra buck. Politifact was one of several websites that recently had to admit its website was compromised with cryptocurrency-mining malware without their knowledge. Showtime was also forced to acknowledge (barely) that websites on two different Showtime domains had been compromised and infected with Coinhive-embedded malware.

  • Why Bug Bounties Matter

    Bugs exist in software. That's a fact, not a controversial statement. The challenge (and controversy) lies in how different organizations find the bugs in their software.

    One way for organizations to find bugs is with a bug bounty program. Bug bounties are not a panacea or cure-all for finding and eliminating software flaws, but they can play an important role.

  • Shell Scripting and Security

    The internet ain't what it used to be back in the old days. I remember being online back when it was known as ARPAnet actually—back when it was just universities and a handful of corporations interconnected. Bad guys sneaking onto your computer? We were living in blissful ignorance then.

    Today the online world is quite a bit different, and a quick glimpse at the news demonstrates that it's not just global, but that bad actors, as they say in security circles, are online and have access to your system too. The idea that any device that's online is vulnerable is more true now than at any previous time in computing history.

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 82 - RSA, TLS, Chrome HTTP, and PCI

Devuan 2.0 Reaches Beta, Debian Without Systemd & Now Based On Stretch

Filed under
Debian

It's been a while since last having anything to report on Devuan, the Debian derivative focused on "init freedom" by shipping the Debian packages without any dependence on systemd. But just in time for Valentine's Day, Devuan 2.0 Beta is now available.

Devuan 1.0 was released last year and based on the Debian Jessie package set while the Devuan 2.0 development is tracking Debian Stretch. Thus with the switch to Devuan 2.0 comes a lot of upstream package updates while this distribution remains committed to shipping without systemd and still providing a GNU/Linux desktop experience.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

You Can Now Install KDE's Plasma Mobile on Your Android Smartphone, Here's How

Filed under
Android
KDE

If you want to try something new on your Android smartphone, the KDE Project provides the community with not one but two methods for installing its Plasma Mobile, a full-featured software system for mobile devices.

The first method uses postmarketOS, a pre-configured Alpine Linux-based GNU/Linux distribution optimized for touchscreens and designed to offer KDE's Plasma Mobile as a choice of desktop environment/user interface on top of the Wayland display server.

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elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Will Be Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Coming This Year

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

According to the elementary OS developer, the next release of the Ubuntu-based operating system is getting a new versioning scheme, updated kernel and graphics stacks, as well as the latest GTK+ technologies.

We already knew that "Juno" would be the codename of the next major elementary OS release, but it now looks like the version number was changed from 0.5 to 5.0, which, apparently, won't mean anything to regular users.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Experiences With AMD's Latest

  • AMD's Raven Ridge Botchy Linux Support Appears Worse With Some Motherboards/BIOS
    With my launch testing of the Raven Ridge desktop APUs with the Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G there were some stability issues to report and some hangs within games and mode-setting issues. It appears those issues are exacerbated with some motherboards: the past few days with two different AMD B350 motherboards have been a real pain getting the current AMDGPU driver stack working -- and even Linux 4.17 AMDGPU WIP code -- on either of these Raven Ridge APUs.
  • XDA’s First Full PC Build: An All-AMD Linux Desktop Featuring Ryzen and Polaris
    With GPU prices increasing exponentially over the past few months, it’s been hard to price out a PC. This particular build took us nearly a year to assemble; getting all the parts together was a challenge. (TK, our video producer, delivered the last piece of the puzzle after the Consumer Electronics Show in January.) Our goal was to show what a decent budget can get you in an all-AMD build, and what kind of performance you can expect from it. Thanks to AMD Ryzen and Polaris, we were able to do just that.
  • Ryzen 3 2200G Video Memory Size Testing On Linux
    One of the discussion items in the forums this week was about the video memory allowance for the Vega graphics on Raven Ridge APUs as well as efficiences or inefficiencies around the TTM memory manager as used by the AMDGPU kernel driver. Here are some vRAM size tests with the Ryzen 3 2200G.

Today in Techrights

Web Server Setup Series - Fix CWP Errors & Warnings To Improve Server Security

​Welcome to the second part of the web server setup series. In this part, I'll show you how to fix CWP (CentOS web panel) errors and warnings, create new user accounts, create hosting packages, and create FTP account. So let's start. Read
more

How To Make Good Use Of 'grep' Command

​Linux and UNIX systems come with a shell command known as ‘grep’. This simply looks for a specified text, or pattern, in a file or an entire directory. The most common usage is for quickly searching a file for occurrences of a pattern, which can be in plain text, or in the form of a regular expression. Here, the patterns used will be simple text rather than regular expressions. Read
more