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Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 10 Hello World programs for your Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:28am
Story Graphics Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:22am
Story New in LWN About Linux (Now Outside Paywall) Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:02am
Story LLVM Release Schedules and DragonFFI Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:01am
Story ​Linus Torvalds slams CTS Labs over AMD vulnerability report Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:12am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 1:19am
Story Open source project aims to build embedded Linux hypervisor Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 1:12am
Story Microsoft is Still Evil and Dangerous Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 12:46am
Story Sound Open Firmware (SOF) and Nvidia-Docker Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:10pm
Story Software: AMP, GCompris, Terminus, PyCharm, Rcpp, Curl Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:09pm

Fedora 28 Release Date and New Features

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Here is Fedora 28 release date, features and everything important associated with it in one single article.
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today's leftovers

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Linux, Microsoft, and Polls

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  • Linux 4.17 Will Be Another Exciting Kernel Cycle

    While the Linux 4.16 kernel release is still three weeks or so away, the Linux 4.17 kernel is already shaping up to be another exciting cycle.

  • Microsoft Helps Get A Computer Recycler Sentenced To 15 Months In Prison For Offering Unapproved Recovery Disks

    To ensure no good deed goes unpunished, Microsoft is trying to get a computer recycler tossed in prison because he almost provided Windows recovery disks to users who needed them. Eric Lundgren, who's made heroic efforts to prevent dangerous computer parts from filling landfills, is facing a 15-month sentence and a $50,000 fine for manufacturing 28,000 recovery disks. His sentence is based on two charges: conspiracy and copyright infringement.

    Tom Jackman has the whole story at the Washington Post and it's half-tragedy, half-farce. Lundgren runs a company that prevents tens of millions of pounds of harmful chemicals and metals from ending up in landfills. In return for doing more than his part to save the planet, he'll gets a chance to spend a year in jail and hand Microsoft $50,000 in compensation for sales it never "lost" from recovery discs he never got a chance to distribute.

  • Best Laptop

    The ThinkPad began life at IBM, but in 2005, it was purchased by Lenovo along with the rest of IBM's PC business. Lenovo evolved the line, and today the company is well known as a geek favorite. Lenovo's ThinkPads are quiet, fast and arguably have one of the best keyboards (fighting words!). Linux Journal readers say Lenovo's Linux support is excellent, leaving many to ponder why the company doesn't ship laptops with Linux installed.

  • Best Linux Desktop Environment

Software: IG:dm, GRV, Home Assistant, KEXI, Karton, GNOME 3.28 Imminent

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  • IG:dm – A Desktop Client for Sending Instagram Direct Messages

    Not too long ago we released an article on an unofficial Instagram desktop app for Linux, Ramme. Awesome app; except that you are still limited to sending direct messages with your phone’s Instagramm app. Today, we bring good news to you in the form of IG:dm.

    IG:dm is a free, unofficial Instagram desktop client with which you can send direct Instagram messages from your desktop.

  • GRV – A Tool for Viewing Git Repositories in Linux Terminal

    GRV (Git Repository Viewer) is a free open-source and simple terminal-based interface for viewing git repositories. It provides a way to view and search refs, commits, branches and diffs using Vi/Vim like key bindings. It’s behavior and style can be easily customized through a configuration file.

  • Home Assistant 0.65: Rename entities, new filter sensor, UpCloud and Channels

    Release 0.65 has arrived and oh boy, is it awesome. First off, in case you have missed the previous release notes and announcements: Starting with this release, Home Assistant has dropped support for Python 3.4. The minimum supported version is now Python 3.5.3. If you are on or Docker, you’ll automatically be running the latest and greatest. If you’re on an older Hassbian installation or did your own Linux setup you’ll need to upgrade to at least Python 3.5.3.


  • KEXI 3.1 Released As Open-Source/Free Alternative To Microsoft Access

    ...over 200 bug fixes and more comprising this new KDE software package release.

  • Karton 1.0 Released For Running Linux Programs on macOS & Other Distros/Architectures

    Karton is a Docker-based solution for running Linux programs on macOS or other Linux distributions as well as different architectures.

    Karton makes use of Docker in making it easy to deploy a Linux distribution and then what package(s) to install and then what directories to make available to the host operating system. Karton makes the containers semi-persistent and easy to handle for a smooth experience short of configuring Docker yourself.

  • Karton 1.0

    By using Docker, Karton manages semi-persistent containers with easy to use automatic folder sharing and lots of small details which make the experience smooth. You shouldn’t notice you are using command line programs from a different OS or distro.

  • GNOME 3.28 Is Being Released This Next Week With Many Features & Improvements

    Assuming no last minute snafu, the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment will see its official release happen on 14 March, incorporating the past six months worth of improvements to this open-source desktop stack.

    There have been many improvements to GNOME 3.28, many of the changes we find most exciting have been outlined below.

    - Improvements to the Wayland support have continued with the Mutter compositor becoming quite solid with its Wayland support with additions this cycle like the GTK text input protocol and XWayland keyboard grabbing. When Mutter is acting as a Wayland compositor, among other changes, it now supports GBM with modifiers to support tiling and compression of scanout surfaces.

Red Hat and Fedora: OpenShift, FIPS 140-2, Fedora 28 and More

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Red Hat

Debian and Ubuntu: Debian LTS, Debian 9.4, Zstd and More

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  • Debian LTS work, February 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and worked 13 hours. I will carry over 2 hours to March.

    I made another release on the Linux 3.2 longterm stable branch (3.2.99) and started the review cycle for the next update (3.2.100). I rebased the Debian package onto 3.2.99 but didn't upload an update to Debian this month.

  • Debian 9.4 Stretch GNU/Linux Released With 150+ Fixes: Update Now

    One of the great things about using a popular Linux distro is that you keep getting timely upgrades, which ensure that you’re running a secure operating system. The same holds true for Debian GNU/Linux, whose development team keeps offering regular updates. Just a couple of days ago, the team pushed the fourth point release of Debian 9 “stretch.”

    For those who don’t know, Debian 9.0 series is an LTS edition, and it’ll remain supported for the next five years.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.4 "Stretch" Point Release Brings More Than 70 Security Fixes

    The Debian Project announced over the weekend the release of the fourth maintenance update to the stable Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series.

    Debian GNU/Linux 9.4 "Stretch" comes three months after the 9.3 point release and brings more than 70 security fixes and 89 miscellaneous bugfixes for various core components or other packages available in the main software repositories of the Linux-based operating system. However, the Debian Project warns that this point release doesn't represent a new version of Debian Stretch.

    "This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included," reads the release announcement.

  • Debian 9.4 released
  • Ubuntu Installs Made 10% Faster Using Facebook Tech

    If you long to install Ubuntu a little bit faster help it at hand thanks to some nifty open-source tech developed by Facebook.

    Using Zstandard (zstd), a ‘lossless data compression algorithm’ developed by Facebook, Ubuntu developers have been able to speed up Ubuntu installs by 10%.

    While Zstd is primarily designed for use in “real-time compression scenarios” it is able to unpack packages during an Ubuntu install faster than current compression tools Xz and Gzip do.

  • Canonical Working On Zstd-Compressed Debian Packages For Ubuntu

    Support for Zstd-compressed Debian packages was worked on last week by some Canonical/Ubuntu developers and already by the end of the year they are looking at potentially using it by default.

    Zstd is the compression algorithm out of Facebook that has been attracting a fair amount of interest in the Linux/open-source space due to its higher decompression speeds that can trump XZ or Gzip.

  • Keeping Governance Simple and Uncomplicated

    We did this in Ubuntu. We started with some core governance boards (the Community Council, focused on community policy and the Technical Council focused on technical policy). The rest of the extensive governance structure came as Ubuntu grew significantly. Our goal was always to keep things as lightweight as possible.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Beta 1 Released for Participating Flavors

    Ahoy, Beavers! The first beta builds of the Ubuntu 18.04 release cycle have been released and are available to download.


OSS Leftovers

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Programming/Development: GSoC 2018, LLVM, GitLab and More

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  • Student Applications For GSoC 2018 Now Open

    If you are a university student and would like to pursue a career in Linux/open-source software development, a great way to get a jump-start on that is through Google's annual Summer of Code program. Student applications for GSoC 2018 are now being accepted.

  • What’s new in LLVM

    The LLVM compiler framework has gone from being a technological curiosity to a vital piece of the modern software landscape. It is the engine behind the Clang compiler, as well as the compilers for the Rust and Swift languages, and provides a powerful toolkit for creating new languages.

    It is also a fairly fast-moving project, with major point revisions announced every six months or so. Version 6.0, released earlier this month, continues LLVM’s ongoing mission to deepen and broaden support for a variety of compilation targets. The update also adds many timely fixes to guard against recently discovered processor-level system attacks.

  • GitLab: 2018 is the year for open source and DevOps

    DevOps and open source aren’t slowing down anytime soon, a newly released report revealed. GitLab released its 2018 Global Developer Survey on developers’ perception of their workplace, workflow, and tooling within IT organizations.

    The demand for DevOps continues to grow, even though there are still challenges created by outdated tools and company resistance to change. According to the report, only 23 percent identify DevOps as their development methodology. However, IT management has named DevOps as one of the top three areas of investment in 2018, indicating that the number of DevOps adopters is sure to grow this year.

  • 11 considerations for picking the right technology

    There are myriad open source projects available for just about every component of a modern software stack—the array of choices can be dizzying, especially when starting from scratch or making many choices at once. With the above criteria in mind, however, you should be better equipped to think rationally about your needs and how each of your options might or might not suit them. Happy hunting!

Mozilla: Rust's 2018 Roadmap, This Week In Servo 107, TenFourFox FPR6 available

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  • Rust Gets A 2018 Roadmap, Big "Productivity" Edition Planned This Year

    The developers behind the Rust programming language have put out a road-map for the year as well as details on the forthcoming "Rust 2018" Edition that succeeds the 1.x release series.

  • Rust's 2018 roadmap

    Each year the Rust community comes together to set out a roadmap. This year, in addition to the survey, we put out a call for blog posts in December, which resulted in 100 blog posts written over the span of a few weeks. The end result is the recently-merged 2018 roadmap RFC.

  • This Week In Servo 107

    In the last week, we merged 85 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

    Congratulations to waywardmonkeys for their new mandate to review and maintain the low-level harfbuzz bindings, and their work to create safe higher-level bindings!

  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR6 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 6 is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). Other than finishing the security patches and adding a couple more entries to the basic adblock, there are no other changes in this release. Assuming no issues, it will become live Monday evening Pacific time as usual.

    The backend for the main download page at Floodgap has been altered such that the Downloader is now only offered to browsers that do not support TLS 1.2 (this is detected by checking for a particular JavaScript math function Math.hypot, the presence of which I discovered roughly correlates with TLS 1.2 support in Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, Safari and Firefox/TenFourFox). This is to save bandwidth on our main server since those browsers are perfectly capable of downloading directly from SourceForge and don't need the Downloader to help them. This is also true of Leopard WebKit, assuming the Security framework update is also installed.

Eric S Raymond's UPS Rant and Solution

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  • [Older] UPSes suck and need to be disrupted


    I use a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) to protect the Great Beast of Malvern from power outages and lightning strikes. Every once in a while I have to buy a replacement UPS and am reminded of how horribly this entire product category sucks. Consumer-grade UPSes suck, SOHO UPSs suck, and I am reliably informed by my friends who run datacenters that no, you cannot ascend into a blissful upland of winnitude by shelling out for expensive “enterprise-grade” UPSes – they all suck too.

  • Eric S Raymond Taking To Working On An Open Hardware / Open-Source UPS

    ESR is very unhappy with the state of UPS power supplies and he is hoping for an open-source, easily buildable design could change the landscape. At the moment the focus is on just pushing out the PCB schematics and design for such a unit with users left to build the UPS yourself, but he has said he wouldn't mind if some startup or other company ends up making use of these open-source plans to bring a better UPS to market.

  • Eric Raymond's New UPS Project, Ubuntu's Bionic Beaver 18.04 Beta Released, Kernel Prepatch 4.16-rc5 and More

    The Upside project is hosted on GitLab and "is currently defining requirements and developing a specification for a 'high quality UPS that can be built from off-the-shelf parts in any reasonably well-equipped makerspace or home electronics shop'."

Servers/Containers: Kubernetes, Former Docker CEO, and Linux Foundation Boosting Microsoft

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Lego-based hacker kit offers choice of Arduino or Raspberry Pi

A “Leguino” educational hacker kit launching on Kickstarter lets you extend Lego projects with Lego form-factor gears, motors, displays, sensors, and breadboards, controlled by a “Visuino” GUI dev environment running on an Arduino or RPi Zero W.

A Belfast based startup called Leguino has launched a Kickstarter project for a Leguino robotics and hacking kit designed to integrate with existing Lego parts. The kit provides a variety of add-on sensors, motors, and other gizmos as Lego-style bricks for easy integration with Lego designs. Most of the lower cost designs are sold in kits with Arduino Uno or Nano bricks, but one higher-end kit is powered by a Raspberry Pi Zero W. Both the Arduino and RPi-based kits can be programmed with a visual, drag-and-drop development kit called Visuino, which is based on the Rockbotic coding education software.

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NVIDIA 390.42 Linux Driver Released

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NVIDIA has just published the 390.42 Linux graphics driver as their latest maintenance update in this long-lived driver series.

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Graphics: OpenChrome, FP64, Wine/Vulkan, QC1

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  • OpenChrome KMS Can Now Do Runtime Resolution Changes, Hopes To Go Mainline In 2018

    The OpenChrome KMS/DRM driver can finally handle run-time resolution changes without crashing. The developer now hopes to be able to mainline this driver into the Linux kernel in 2018.

    OpenChrome KMS previously has been unable to handle run-time resolution changes without crashing the X.Org Server, but now this kernel mode-setting driver can do so. After previously battling a standby resume problem for OpenChrome KMS and now tackling this screen resolution change crash, developer Kevin Brace is now able to get by without regular crashes to his computer. This now puts the OpenChrome KMS support about on-par with the DDX driver's user-space mode-setting support.

  • OpenChrome DRM Driver To Work On New GEM/TTM Code, Regression Fixes

    Now that the OpenChrome DRM driver is hoping to go mainline in 2018 now that it can handle run-time resolution changes without crashing the X.Org Server, the project's lone developer Kevin Brace has published a TODO list of other code changes he has planned prior to getting this open-source VIA x86 graphics driver into the mainline Linux kernel.

  • David Airlie Moves Toward Upstreaming Soft FP64 Support In Mesa

    There's been work going on for years of "soft" FP64 support to allow emulated support for the double-precision floating-point data types for GPUs not otherwise inherently supporting this capability. The soft support would allow for some older GPUs to then advertise OpenGL 4.0+ support now that ARB_gpu_shader_fp64 support could be enabled. That day looks like it's finally coming for mainline Mesa.

  • Vulkan WSI Support Is The Latest Being Worked On For Wine

    Following more Wine Vulkan code being merged and the first milestone being achieved of vulkaninfo working, Roderick Colenbrander has submitted his latest patches in the bring-up of Vulkan support under Wine.

  • This Cryptocoin Miner Uses GPU Heat To Warm Up Your Room

    Now, a French startup Qarnot has added way new name to the list: a crypto heater. Yes, you heard that right. The heater, called QC1, can warm up your room while its mines crypto coins. To do so, it houses two Sapphire Nitro + Radeon GPU RX 580 GPUs with 8GB VRAM each.

Games Leftovers

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Plasma Mobile - A grain of hope in a sandstorm of despair

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I am really happy that Plasma Mobile exists. It's a natural continuation of an excellent desktop environment. But the technicals have never been a problem. Not so with Ubuntu or any other operating system. That's never the issue. The app ecosystem is all that matters. And that will take monumental effort and investment to achieve, if ever.

The early tech demonstrator is an interesting project, but it's not dazzling enough yet to create sufficient interest in Plasma as a mobile platform. Matching the rivals is a zero-sum game. People already have Android and iOS. Those needs are met. But perhaps, Plasma Mobile can do more? After all, a tiny hobbyist kernel created in early 90s became the powerhouse of the modern Internet and cloud infrastructure. It's difficult to predict how well will Plasma Mobile do. Let's hope it will be more than a checkbox on an enthusiasm sheet of dashed hopes. Full power on, engage.

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Also: KEXI 3.1 Brings Database Application Building to Windows

FSF/FSFE/GNU: GNU Automake 1.16, Geniatech v McHard, The Noble Volunteer

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  • GNU Automake 1.16 released

    We are pleased to announce the GNU Automake 1.16 minor release.

    This release follows 1.15.1 which was made 8 months ago.

    See below for the detailed list of changes since the previous version, as summarized by the NEWS file.

  • My Affidavit in the Geniatech vs. McHardy Case

    As many people know, last week there was a court hearing in the Geniatech vs. McHardy case. This was a case brought claiming a license violation of the Linux kernel in Geniatech devices in the German court of OLG Cologne.

    Harald Welte has written up a wonderful summary of the hearing, I strongly recommend that everyone go read that first.

    In Harald’s summary, he refers to an affidavit that I provided to the court. Because the case was withdrawn by McHardy, my affidavit was not entered into the public record. I had always assumed that my affidavit would be made public, and since I have had a number of people ask me about what it contained, I figured it was good to just publish it for everyone to be able to see it.

  • GNU developer abandons action against Geniatech

    Former Linux developer Patrick McHardy dropped his Gnu General Public License version 2 (GPLv2) violation case against Geniatech in a German court this week.

    Some are seeing the case as a victory for those who want to convince companies to mend their ways and honour their GPLv2 legal requirements.

    Normally if a developer is hacked off with an outfit ignoring the GPU legal arrangements he or she asks the Free Software Foundation, Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC), and the Software Freedom Law Center to approach violators. But these groups tend to lean on companies to get their act together rather than suing them for lots of cash.

    McHardy, however, after talking with SFC, dropped out from this diplomatic approach and went his own way. In fact, McHardy was accused of seeking financial gain by approaching numerous companies in German courts.

  • The Noble Volunteer (Again)

    I have written about how the Python Software Foundation raises and spends money before. For the most part, nothing has changed since then: the PSF appears to raise and then spend hundreds of thousands of dollars every year (apparently down from over $300000 in 2016 to under $250000 in 2017, though), directing this money mostly towards events and promotion. In fact, the largest contribution to core-related Python software development in 2017 was actually from the Mozilla Open Source Support programme, with a $170000 grant to fix up the Python Package Index infrastructure. So the PSF is clearly comfortable leaving it to others to fund the P in PSF.

    Lots of people depend on the Python Package Index, but like with Free Software in general, the people making good money while leaning on these common, volunteer-run resources never seem to pitch in significantly themselves. It is true that the maintainer of this resource was allowed to work on it as his day job, but then got “downsized”, and now works in a role where he can work on it again but only as part of his day job. But I imagine that the people at Mozilla, some of whom have connections to the world of Python packaging, quite possibly relying on the package infrastructure to get their own stuff done, were getting fed up with “volunteers” as being the usual excuse for nothing getting done.

SparkyLinux 5.3 Rolling Linux OS Debuts Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

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SparkyLinux currently comes in two flavors, Stable and Rolling, and while the former is based on the most recent stable release of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system, the latter is usually using the software repositories of Debian Testing. In this case, SparkyLinux 5.3 is based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" OS.

The SparkyLinux 5 Rolling series hasn't been updated since last December, and the new release brings a recent kernel from the Linux 4.15 series, namely version 4.15.4, the latest stable Calamares 3.1.12 graphical installer, support for the Btrfs and XFS filesystems, and all the latest updates from the Debian Buster repos as of March 7, 2018.

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More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 10 Hello World programs for your Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:28am
Story Graphics Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:22am
Story New in LWN About Linux (Now Outside Paywall) Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:02am
Story LLVM Release Schedules and DragonFFI Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 10:01am
Story ​Linus Torvalds slams CTS Labs over AMD vulnerability report Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:12am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 1:19am
Story Open source project aims to build embedded Linux hypervisor Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 1:12am
Story Microsoft is Still Evil and Dangerous Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 12:46am
Story Sound Open Firmware (SOF) and Nvidia-Docker Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:10pm
Story Software: AMP, GCompris, Terminus, PyCharm, Rcpp, Curl Roy Schestowitz 14/03/2018 - 11:09pm