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Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: AMDGPU, Mesa 17.3.7, RADV Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 3:27am
Story Server: Containers, Kubernetes, Varnish 6.0, HHVM 3.25.0, 3.24.4, and 3.21.8 Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 3:25am
Story Linux Foundation: Ads, CNCF, P4 Language Consortium, ACRN, Open Networking Summit Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 3:23am
Story Canonical/Ubuntu: Mir, Ubuntu Core, Desktop Report, and OpenStack Upgrades Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 3:21am
Story Government of Jamaica to Actively Pursue Greater Use of Open Source Software – Wheatley Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 2:47am
Story 3D Printing and Open Source Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 9:24pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 9:23pm
Story Private Internet Access releases software as open source Roy Schestowitz 2 16/03/2018 - 8:59pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 7:27pm
Story Security: 17 Things Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 7:17pm

Mozilla Development/News

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  • Making WebAssembly better for Rust & for all languages

    One big 2018 goal for the Rust community is to become a web language. By targeting WebAssembly, Rust can run on the web just like JavaScript. But what does this mean? Does it mean that Rust is trying to replace JavaScript?

    The answer to that question is no. We don’t expect Rust WebAssembly apps to be written completely in Rust. In fact, we expect the bulk of application code will still be JS, even in most Rust WebAssembly applications.

    This is because JS is a good choice for most things. It’s quick and easy to get up and running with JavaScript. On top of that, there’s a vibrant ecosystem full of JavaScript developers who have created incredibly innovative approaches to different problems on the web.

  • March Add(on)ness: Video Download Helper (1) Vs Cookie AD (4)

    Video DownloadHelper is the easy way to download and convert Web videos from hundreds of YouTube-like sites.

    Video DownloadHelper is a strong contender, giving users the ability to snag videos from virtually any site. The add-on automatically finds videos on a webpage. What users do with those videos is nobody’s business and anyone’s guess.

    Fun Fact: 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute and almost 5 billion videos are watched on Youtube every single day. If you tried to download all of them, your computer would explode.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 225
  • The new Firefox lets you stop websites from asking to send you notifications

    The Mozilla Foundation released a new version of Firefox this week—release number 59. It treads further down the performance improvement path that November's Quantum release began, but its most interesting feature is a quality-of-life one: Firefox 59 users can prevent some websites from popping up requests to send notifications to your device or from requesting to use your camera unexpectedly.

  • Things Gateway, Part 7 - IKEA TRÅDFRI

    In this series of postings, I've been setting up, configuring, and playing with IoT devices through the experimental Things Gateway from Mozilla. I've covered the generic Zigbee and Z-Wave devices, the Philips Hue devices, and the TP-Link WiFi devices. Today, I add IKEA TRÅDFRI to this circus.

    Of course, in this series, I've also been doing a bit of editorializing. I was critical of the TP-Link devices because their security model requires the end user to just trust them. I'm critical of the IKEA TRÅDFRI for a physical safety reason. What does the word TRÅDFRI mean? I'm assuming it is a Swedish word that means "severe blood loss from slashed wrists" because that is what is likely to happen when opening the package. The clamshell plastic that entombs their products is difficult to open with anything short of a chainsaw. My kitchen scissors wouldn't do the job and I had to resort to garden pruning shears and that left dangerously sharp pieces that drew blood. Be careful.

  • Firefox Performance Update #3

    Hi! I’ve got another slew of Firefox performance work to report today.

    Special thanks to the folks who submitted things through this form to let me know about performance work that’s taken place recently! If you’ve seen something fixed lately that’ll likely have a positive impact on Firefox performance, let me know about it!

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.4 MR

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Team LibreELEC celebrates its second birthday (and international Pi-Day) with the release of LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.4 which brings minor bug-fixes and new firmware to support the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ hardware announced this morning.

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With this operating system you can have privacy and anonymity

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With the popularity of social media, it would seem as though people are not all that concerned with their privacy. Some like to share updates about pretty much anything they do, and while no one really cares about what anyone else had for lunch, the point is if you want to know what someone is up to, you may just have to look online.

Just because people aren't bashful about their lives does not mean they want everything they do online to be recorded, yet with the way browsers and operating systems are set up, there is a record of a lot of what we do. Unless you are a programmer, you may not see much of a way around it.

But there is a way, actually. An operating system that is designed to start on almost any computer from a DVD or USB drive exists and, best of all, it is free.

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Also: Tails 3.6 Anonymous OS Released with Linux Kernel 4.15, Latest Tor Updates

The Register Looks at *Ubuntu 18.04 Beta

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  • 18.04 beta is as good a time as any to see which Ubuntu flavour tickles your Budgie, MATE

    The first beta of Ubuntu 18.04 is here. The finished article, due next month, will be a long-term support release and, for those who stick with LTS, the first time many see the new GNOME-based Ubuntu.

    This beta, however, does not include the main GNOME-based release. Instead this is more a community release with most of the Ubuntu flavours participating. This particular test build is slightly more noteworthy than usual since, thanks to the havoc wreaked by Spectre and Meltdown, which limited the use of many distros' build systems, it is really the first milestone for most of the flavours. It also came a couple of days late, which is unusual for an Ubuntu beta.

    As the Xubuntu developers note: "The ISO Tracker has seen little activity for the last few development cycles. We know we have some excited users already using and testing 18.04. But without testing results being recorded anywhere, we have to assume that nobody is testing the daily images and milestones. And this has major implications for both the 18.04 release and the project as a whole."

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver Beta 1 Released

    Many of the popular flavours of the famous Ubuntu Linux system such as Kubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu MATE and Xubuntu, have released beta downloads for the upcoming Long-Term Support release of Ubuntu 18.04.

    Typically, the Ubuntu team releases an LTS edition of the OS, every two years, which will carry major security updates and patches, as well as full support, for five years.

Games: Life is Strange, Unreal Engine 4.19, Slime Rancher and More

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  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm Is Coming to Linux and Mac This Spring

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced today that it would port the standalone adventure story Life is Strange: Before the Storm to the Linux and macOS platforms this spring.

    Feral Interactive already brought Linux gamers the episodic graphic adventure video game Life Is Strange developed by Dontnod Entertainment and published by Square Enix, and they now plan to bring the new, three-part standalone story Life is Strange: Before the Storm, which is developed by Deck Nine.

  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm is officially coming to Linux, port from Feral Interactive

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm [Steam], the standalone story adventure set three years before the original is officially heading to Linux! Feral Interactive have today announced that it will arrive sometime this Spring.

    Feral Interactive ported the original Life is Strange episodes to Linux, so I’m not surprised they’re teaming up again to bring Before the Storm to Linux. I think they did a very good job of the port before and I certainly enjoyed it a lot. Life is Strange: Before the Storm - Deluxe Edition for Linux will include all three episodes along with the bonus episode, "Farewell".

  • Feral Bringing Life is Strange: Before the Storm To Linux

    hile still working on A Total War Saga: THRONES OF BRITANNIA and Rise of The Tomb Raider to Linux this spring, Feral Interactive has now confirmed another port coming to Linux (and macOS).

    This spring Feral will also be delivering Life is Strange: Before the Storm to Linux and macOS. This adventure story game is being ported to Linux/macOS by Feral while they haven't yet announced the system requirements nor confirming yet if it will be an OpenGL or Vulkan port.

  • Unreal Engine 4.19 Brings Resonance Audio, AR Improvements & Better Landscape Rendering

    As a nice Pi Day surprise and a week ahead of the Game Developers' Conference (GDC 18) is a new Unreal Engine 4 release from Epic Games.

    Unreal Engine 4.19 has over one hundred improvements compared to UE 4.18 and a wealth of fixes. Among the highlights of Unreal Engine 4.19 include temporal upsampling support, a unified AR framework, physical light units, sequencer improvements, HTC VIVE Pro VR headset support, landscape rendering optimizations, an experimental proxy LOD system, experimental material layering support, and more.

  • Slime Rancher's big Mochi's Megabucks update is out, fixes Linux blackscreen issues

    Slime Rancher [GOG, Steam], the game about running around sucking up cute (and some not so cute) slimes and running a farm is easily one of the sweetest games available on Linux and the Mochi's Megabucks update is rather good.

    Firstly, you no longer need to tweak anything to get around the old Unity3D bug where on Linux you would get a blackscreen, as they've updated Unity for this release and it works perfectly now!

  • Serious Sam's Bogus Detour is being pirated with permission from the developer

    According to TorrentFreak, Serious Sam's Bogus Detour [Steam] is being pirated by Voksi, one of the people known for cracking Denuvo.

  • KING Art have remastered their 'whodunit' adventure The Raven – Legacy of a Master Thief and it's out now
  • Citra, the work in progress Nintendo 3DS emulator now has a much improved OpenGL renderer

    For those who love emulation, you might want to know about Citra [Official Site], a work in progress Nintendo 3DS emulator that we've never written about here before. It seems they've been hard at work too!

    Unlike the Dolphin emulator for the GameCube and the Wii, Citra is not currently moving towards Vulkan. Instead, they've poured a lot of work into their current OpenGL renderer to improve performance and fix rendering issues and from what they've shown, it's getting quite impressive.

LLVM Clang 6.0 vs. 5.0 Compiler Performance On Intel/AMD Linux

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Since last week's big release of LLVM 6.0 along with Clang 6.0, I have been carrying out some fresh compiler benchmarks of the previous Clang 5.0 to this new stable release that switches to C++14 by default, among many other changes to LLVM itself and this C/C++ compiler front-end.

For your compiler benchmark viewing pleasure today are results of LLVM Clang 5.0 vs. 6.0 on four distinctly different systems: two Intel, two AMD, for getting a glimpse at how the Clang 6.0 compiler performance is looking at this time. For those wondering how Clang 6.0 is stacking up compared to the soon-to-be-released GCC 8.1 compiler, those benchmarks will come when GCC 8.1 is officially available.

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Meet the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

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Raspberry Pi just celebrated its sixth birthday—that's six years since the launch of the original Raspberry Pi. Since then, it has released various new models, including the Pi 2, Pi 3, and Pi Zero. So far, 9 million Raspberry Pi 3s have been sold—and over 18 million Pis in total—and those numbers are likely to grow following today's announcement of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+.

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Also: Raspberry Pi 3B+ Launches With Faster CPU, Dual-Band 802.11ac, Faster Ethernet

Introducing GNOME 3.28: “Chongqing”

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GNOME 3.28 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 25832 changes, made by approximately 838 contributors.

3.28 has been named “Chongqing” in recognition of the team behind GNOME.Asia 2017. GNOME.Asia is GNOME’s official annual summit in Asia, which is only possible thanks to the hard work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Chongqing, China, and we’d like to thank everyone who contributed to its success.

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Also: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

GNOME 3.28 'Chongqing' Linux and BSD desktop environment is here

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Officially Released

Raspberry Pi 3 gets rev’d to B+ with 1.4GHz, WiFi-ac, and GbE with PoE

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The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ has gone on sale for $35, boosting the Model B’s quad -A53 SoC to 1.4GHz, speeding the WiFi to precertified, dual-band 802.11ac, and adding USB-based GbE with PoE support.

Two years after the arrival of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, which brought wireless and 64-bit ARMv8 computing to what was already the most popular Linux hacking platform of all time, Raspberry Pi Trading and the Raspberry Pi Foundation have delivered a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with a faster processor, WiFi, and Ethernet.

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Airbus ditches Microsoft, flies off to Google

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The “decision that will shape our company” was confirmed by Airbus CEO Tom Enders in a memo to staff – seen by The Register – who said the business is gearing up for the next phase of “digital transformation”.

“We need technology that actively supports our new ways of working, modern digital tools that allow us to be fully collaborative, to work across our many different team, across border and time zones - to truly be one.”

With this in mind, “Airbus has decided to take a major transformative step by moving from the Microsoft Office environment to Google Suite,” Enders said.

“Choosing G-Suite is a strategic choice, a clean break with the past while assuring business continuity. Let’s embark together on this journey towards a truly collaborative enterprise,” he said.

For anyone living under a rock for years, G-Suite is a line of web-based computing, productivity and collaboration tools that were initially launched under the Google Apps for Your Domain brand in 2006.

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Security: AMD and Samba Flaws

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IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 119 released

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This is the release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 119. It updates the toolchain of the distribution and fixes a number of smaller bug and security issues. Therefore this update is another one of a series of general housekeeping updates to make IPFire better, faster and of course more secure!

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Also: NuTyX 10.1 available with cards 2.4.0

Adelaide Uni open sources venerable Ludwig editor

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The University of Adelaide will release the source code of the Ludwig editor, originally developed for use on VAX minicomputers.

Ludwig’ source code will be published on GitHub under the MIT Open Source Licence, the university announced today.

DEC’s first VAX system, the VAX-11/78, was unveiled in 1977. Adelaide Uni purchased three of the minicomputers in 1979.

The computers supported interaction through video terminals and replaced punch-card-driven systems that only offered batch processing and printed output,

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Also: 4 reasons enterprise open source works best

5 open source card and board games for Linux

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Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but many of those games are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

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What legal remedies exist for breach of GPL software?

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Last April, a federal court in California handed down a decision in Artifex Software, Inc. v. Hancom, Inc., 2017 WL 1477373 (N.D. Cal. 2017), adding a new perspective to the forms of remedies available for breach of the General Public License (GPL). Sadly, this case reignited the decades-old license/contract debate due to some misinterpretations under which the court ruled the GPL to be a contract. Before looking at the remedy developments, it’s worth reviewing why the license debate even exists.

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i.MX8M SBC on pre-order for $165

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Boundary Devices has launched a $165 “Nitrogen8M” SBC that runs Linux or Android on a quad-core i.MX8M with GbE, WiFi, BT, HDMI 2.0, mini-PCIe, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 4x USB 3.0, and optional -40 to 85°C support.

Boundary Devices has updated its Nitrogen line of NXP i.MX based SBCs with a Nitrogen8M model that runs Android, Yocto, Ubuntu, Buildroot, or Debian based Linux on NXP’s i.MX8M. Available on pre-order starting at $165 with 2GB RAM, the SBC will ship this Spring.

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Arduino Create expands to run Arduino on BeagleBone and Raspberry Pi

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Arduino announced an expansion of its Arduino Create development platform for deploying Arduino sketches on Linux systems to support Arm boards like the the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone in addition to Intel boards like the UP Squared.

In November, Arduino announced a version of its Arduino Create toolkit that supports Intel-based systems running Linux, with specific support for a new UP Squared IoT Grove Development Kit. Today at the Embedded Linux Conference in Portland, where Arduino co-founder and CTO Massimo Banzi is a keynote speaker, Arduino announced an expansion of Arduino Create to support Arm boards. The platform provides optimized support for the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone boards.

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Neptune 5.0 Linux OS Released with KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS, Based on Debian Stretch

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Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14 kernel ported from Debian Stretch's Backports repository, Neptune 5.0 uses the latest KDE Plasma 5.12 desktop environment along with the KDE Applications 17.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.43.0 software suites. It also promises new ways to run the latest software versions.

"This version marks a new iteration within the Neptune universe. It switches its base to the current Debian Stable "Stretch" version and also changes slightly the way we will provide Updates for Neptune. We will no longer strive to bring in more recent versions of Plasma, Kernel or other software on our own," reads the release announcement.

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