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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion Roy Schestowitz 25/05/2018 - 6:01am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 25/05/2018 - 5:02am
Blog entry Tux Machines Privacy Statement Roy Schestowitz 25/05/2018 - 4:59am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 8:10pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 8:09pm
Story Games and Wine: Hacknet - Deluxe, Full Metal Furies and More Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 8:06pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 7:53pm
Story Graphics: XWayland and Mesa Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 7:39pm
Story Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone? Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 7:39pm
Story How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2018 - 7:30pm

Kata Containers 1.0

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Kata Containers 1.0

    The 1.0 release of Kata Containers is here! Thank you to the more than 40 individuals who have contributed to the first release of Kata Containers and to developing the Kata community.

  • VM-container chimera Kata Containers emerges from lab

    The open source Kata Containers project, an effort to combine the security advantages of virtual machines with the deployment and management advantages of software-based containers, hit its 1.0 milestone on Tuesday.

    Forged from a merger of Intel’s Clear Containers and Hyper’s runV announced last December, Kata Containers delivers an Open Container Initiative (OCI)-compatible runtime that addresses the downside of traditional container architecture, a shared kernel.

  • Kata Containers Project Releases 1.0 to Build Secure Container Infrastructure
  • Kata Containers 1.0
  • OpenStack Makes its Open Source CI/CD Platform Available to the Wider World

    The OpenStack Foundation made Zuul, an open source continuous integration/continuous development (CI/CD) platform, into an independent project. Zuul also released version 3 of its software.

    Zuul was originally developed for OpenStack CI testing and has since attracted contributors and users across many different organizations, including BMW, GoDaddy, OpenLab, and Wikimedia. It’s the third project to be managed by the OpenStack Foundation, joining OpenStack and Kata Containers.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • efail: Outdated Crypto Standards are to blame

    I have a lot of thoughts about the recently published efail vulnerability, so I thought I'd start to writeup some of them. I'd like to skip all the public outrage about the disclosure process for now, as I mainly wanted to get into the technical issues, explain what I think went wrong and how things can become more secure in the future. I read lots of wrong statements that "it's only the mail clients" and the underlying crypto standards are fine, so I'll start by explaining why I believe the OpenPGP and S/MIME standards are broken and why we still see these kinds of bugs in 2018. I plan to do a second writeup that will be titled "efail: HTML mails are to blame".

    I assume most will have heard of efail by now, but the quick version is this: By combining a weakness in cryptographic modes along with HTML emails a team of researchers was able to figure out a variety of ways in which mail clients can be tricked into exfiltrating the content of encrypted e-mails. Not all of the attack scenarios involve crypto, but those that do exploit a property of encryption modes that is called malleability. It means that under certain circumstances you can do controlled changes of the content of an encrypted message.

    [...]

    Properly using authenticated encryption modes can prevent a lot of problems. It's been a known issue in OpenPGP, but until know it wasn't pressing enough to fix it. The good news is that with minor modifications OpenPGP can still be used safely. And having a future OpenPGP standard with proper authenticated encryption is definitely possible. For S/MIME the situation is much more dire and it's probably best to just give up on it. It was never a good idea in the first place to have competing standards for e-mail encryption.

    For other crypto protocols there's a lesson to be learned as well: Stop using unauthenticated encryption modes. If anything efail should make that abundantly clear.

  • Comcast Leaked Customer Wi-Fi Logins in Plaintext, Change Your Passcode Now

    A Comcast Xfinity website was leaking Wi-Fi names and passwords, meaning now is a good time to change your Wi-Fi passcode.

    The site, intended to help new customers set up new routers, could easily be fooled into revealing the location of and password for any customer’s Wi-Fi network. A customer ID and a house or apartment number was all would-be attackers needed to get full access to your network, along with your full address.

  • Update Fedora Linux using terminal for latest software patches
  • Patch for New Spectre-Like CPU Bug Could Affect Your Performance
  • container_t versus svirt_lxc_net_t

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • “Ultimate Private Cloud” Demo, Under The Hood!

    At the recent Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, and more recently the OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, the OpenStack engineering team worked on some interesting demos for the keynote talks.

    I’ve been directly involved with the deployment of Red Hat OpenShift Platform on bare metal using the Red Hat OpenStack Platform director deployment/management tool, integrated with openshift-ansible. I’ll give some details of this demo, the upstream TripleO features related to this work, and insight around the potential use-cases.

  • Discover the possibilities of hybrid cloud during a joint virtual event with Red Hat & Microsoft [Ed: [Ed: When Red Hat pus Microsoft executives at top positions inside Red Hat...]
  • Red Hat OpenStack Customer Survey 2018: containers, technical support top of mind

    In 2016, we surveyed our customer base on their use of OpenStack in production, getting a pulse-check on the top considerations, expectations, and benefits of a Red Hat OpenStack Platform deployment. With 2018 marking five years of Red Hat OpenStack Platform, we checked back in with our customers to see if their experiences or expectations of OpenStack have changed. Our survey found:

  • Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst On How He Plans To Win The Container Market
  • Juniper, Red Hat Tighten Integration to Fend Off VMware

    Juniper Networks and Red Hat have tightened their integration efforts in a move to help ease enterprise adoption of cloud-native platforms and bolster their own offerings against the likes of VMware and Cisco.

    The latest platform integration includes the Red Hat OpenStack Platform; Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform running as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) on top of or next to the OpenStack platform depending on deployment architecture; and Juniper’s Contrail Enterprise Multi-Cloud platform running as the networking and security layer to unify those together. This integration is designed as a managed system to help deploy and run applications and services on any virtual machine (VM), container platform, and any cloud environment.

  • Red Hat OpenStack HCI Targets Telco Hybrid Cloud, 5G Deployments

    Red Hat today rolled out a hyperconverged infrastructure (HCI) platform based on OpenStack compute and Ceph storage. The new product targets service providers looking to deploy virtual network functions (VNFs) and 5G technologies on top of open source software.

    Launched at this week’s OpenStack Summit, the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud combines Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 and Red Hat Ceph Storage 3 into one product. Red Hat says it is the largest contributor to both open source projects.

  • Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud Bridges Datacenters and Edge Deployments
  • GSoC 2018: Week 1

    This time, I am working on improving the Fedora Community App with the Fedora project. It’s been a week since we started off our coding on may 14.

    The Fedora App is a central location for Fedora users and innovators to stay updated on The Fedora Project. News updates, social posts, Ask Fedora, as well as articles from Fedora Magazine are all held under this app.

Ubuntu's Mark Shuttleworth pulls no punches on Red Hat and VMware in OpenStack cloud

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

At OpenStack Summit in Vancouver, Canada, the opening keynote speeches started out the way they usually do. There were demos, there were companies saying how their latest release was the best thing since sliced bread... and then, there was Canonical CEO and Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth. Shuttleworth came out firing at two of his major enterprise OpenStack competitors: Red Hat and VMware.

Shuttleworth opened quietly enough, saying, "Mission is to remove all the friction from deploying OpenStack. We can deliver OpenStack deployments with two people in less two weeks anywhere in the world." So far, so typical for a keynote speech.

Read more

The Top 10 Endless Runner Games

Filed under
Reviews

Endless running has always been a favorite for hardcore as well as casual gamers. Creating a high score while running endlessly through various traps, hurdles and scenes. You receive various power-ups and boosters on your way and most probably there is someone trying to catch you

Read<br />
more

Here Is What's New In Fedora 28

Filed under
Linux

For those who don't know about this Linux distro, Fedora is one of those Linux distributions that comes released with cutting-edge software rather than staying on the same boat with other distributions that prefers stability. Fedora comes in three flavors: Workstation, Server, and Atomic. I'll be reviewing Fedora Workstation; used by many developers and users as their general purpose computing platform.

Read<br />
more

Stable kernels 4.16.11, 4.14.43 and 4.9.102

Filed under
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

Filed under
Software
  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring

    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few.

    It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen

  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release

    Better memory profiling on Linux

    After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!

  • Ten Years of Vim

     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

  •  

GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

Filed under
Linux
  • Parrot 4.0 is out

    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.

  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV

    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.

  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices

    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too.

    When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.

  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel

    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth takes aim at VMware and Red Hat at OpenStack Summit

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Ubuntu

“Google, IBM, Microsoft [are] all investing and innovating to drive down the cost of infrastructure. Every single one of those companies engages with Canonical to deliver public services,” he said.

“Not one of them engages with VMware to offer those public services – they can’t afford to. Clearly they have the cash, but they have to compete – and so does your private cloud.”

To capitalise on this trend, the firm is in the throes of rolling out a migration service to help users shift from VMware to a “fully managed” version of Canonical’s Ubuntu OpenStack distribution, which Shuttleworth said costs half as much to run.

“When we take out VMware, and displace VMware, we are regularly told that a fully managed OpenStack solution costs half of the equivalent VMware estate [to run],” he added.

Read more

Tidelift Backed by Former Red Hat Chairman and CEO Matthew Szulik

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source startup Tidelift snags $15 mln Series A

    Boston-based Tidelift, an open source startup, has secured $15 million in Series A funding. General Catalyst, Foundry Group and former Red Hat Chairman and CEO Matthew Szulik led the round. In conjunction with the funding, Larry Bohn, managing director at General Catalyst, Ryan McIntyre, co-founder and managing director at Foundry Group and Szulik have all joined Tidelift’s board of directors.

  • Tidelift raises $15M to find paying gigs for open-source developers maintaining key projects

    Tidelift wants to give open-source developers a way to earn some money for contributing to important open-source projects and while helping the companies that are using those projects in key parts of their business, and it just raised $15 million to build those connections.

    General Catalyst, Foundry Group, and former Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik co-led the Series A founding round into the Boston-based startup, the first time the 17-person company has taken financing, said Donald Fischer, co-founder and CEO of Tidelift. The other co-founders — Havoc Pennington, Jeremy Katz, and Luis Villa — share a wealth of open-source experience across companies like Red Hat and organizations like The Wikimedia Foundation and the Mozilla Foundation.

  • Tidelift Raises $15M Series A To Make Open Source Work Better--For Everyone
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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.17-rc7

So this week wasn't as calm as the previous weeks have been, but despite that I suspect this is the last rc. This week we had the whole "spectre v4" thing, and yes, the fallout from that shows up as part of the patch and commit log. But it's not actually dominant: the patch is pretty evenly one third arch updates, one third networking updates, and one third "rest". The arch updates are largely - although not exclusively - spectre v4. The networking stuff is mostly network drivers, but there's some core networking too. And "the rest" is just that - misc drivers (rdma, gpu, other), documentation, some vfs, vm, bpf, tooling.. The bulk of it is really pretty trivial one-liners, and nothing looks particularly scary. Let's see how next week looks, but if nothing really happens I suspect we can make do without an rc8. Shortlog appended as usual. Go out and test. Read more

Today in Techrights

Libre Hardware

  • Flash your Libre Firmware with a Libre Programmer
    Whether or not you personally agree with all the ideals of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), you’ve got to give them credit: they don’t mess around. They started by laying the groundwork for a free and open source operating system, then once that dream was realized, started pushing the idea of replacing proprietary BIOS firmware with an open alternative such as Libreboot. But apparently, even that’s not enough, as there’s still more freedom to be had. We’re playing 4D Libre Chess now, folks. [...] Luckily, the FSF has just awarded the Zerocat Chipflasher their “Respects Your Freedom” certification, meaning every element of the product is released under a free license for your hacking enjoyment.
  • Coreboot Picks Up Support For Another Eight Year Old Intel Motherboard
    If by chance you happen to have an Intel DG41WV motherboard, it's now supported by mainline Coreboot so you can free the system down to the BIOS. The DG41WV motherboard comes from the LGA-775 days with an Intel G41 Eaglelake chipset back when DDR3-1066 was great, motherboards topped out with 4GB of RAM, four USB 2.0 ports were suitable, and motherboard PCBs were much less fashionable. The DG41WV was a micro-ATX board and a decent choice for the times to pair with a CPU like the Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad.

Events: KubeCon, openSUSE Conference 2018 and Hacker Summer Camp 2018

  • Diversity, education, privilege and ethics in technology
    And that is the ultimate fraud: to make the world believe we are harmless little boys, so repressed that we can't communicate properly. We're so sorry we're awkward, it's because we're all somewhat on the autism spectrum. Isn't that, after all, a convenient affliction for people that would not dare to confront the oppression they are creating? It's too easy to hide behind such a real and serious condition that does affect people in our community, but also truly autistic people that simply cannot make it in the fast-moving world the magical rain man is creating. But the real con is hacking power and political control away from traditional institutions, seen as too slow-moving to really accomplish the "change" that is "needed". We are creating an inextricable technocracy that no one will understand, not even us "experts". Instead of serving the people, the machine is at the mercy of markets and powerful oligarchs. A recurring pattern at Kubernetes conferences is the KubeCon chant where Kelsey Hightower reluctantly engages the crowd in a pep chant: When I say 'Kube!', you say 'Con!' 'Kube!' 'Con!' 'Kube!' 'Con!' 'Kube!' 'Con!' Cube Con indeed... I wish I had some wise parting thoughts of where to go from here or how to change this. The tide seems so strong that all I can do is observe and tell stories. My hope is that the people that need to hear this will take it the right way, but I somehow doubt it. With chance, it might just become irrelevant and everything will fix itself, but somehow I fear things will get worse before they get better.
  • openSUSE Conference 2018
    This year openSUSE conference was held in Prague and, thanks to both my employer and openSUSE conference organizers, I've been able to spend almost a full day there. I've headed to Prague with a Fleet Commander talk accepted and, as openSUSE Leap 15.0 was released Yesterday, also with the idea to show an unattended ("express") installation of the "as fresh as possible" Leap 15.0 happening on GNOME Boxes. The conference was not so big, which helped to easy spot some old friends (Fridrich Strba, seriously? Meeting you after almost 7 years ... I have no words to describe my happiness on seeing you there!), some known faces (as Scott, with whom I just meet at conferences :-)) and also meet some people who either helped me a lot in the past (here I can mention the whole autoyast team who gave me some big support when I was writing down the autoinst.xml for libosinfo, which provides the support to do openSUSE's express installations via GNOME Boxes) or who have some interest in some of the work I've been doing (as Richard Brown who's a well-know figure around SUSE/openSUSE community, a GNOME Boxes user and also an enthusiastic supporter of our work done in libosiinfo/osinfo-db).
  • Hacker Summer Camp 2018: Prep Guide
    For those unfamiliar with the term, Hacker Summer Camp is the combination of DEF CON, Black Hat USA, and BSides Las Vegas that takes place in the hot Las Vegas sun every summer, along with all the associated parties and side events. It’s the largest gathering of hackers, information security professionals and enthusiasts, and has been growing for 25 years. In this post, I’ll present my views on how to get the most out of your 2018 trip to the desert, along with tips & points from some of my friends.