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Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Image Processing on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 3:47pm
Story 4MRecover 23.0 Data Recovery Linux Live System Enters Beta, Based on 4MLinux 23 Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 3:43pm
Story Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and elementary OS All Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 3:42pm
Story Pixel 2 and 2 XL review—The best Android phone you can buy Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 3:39pm
Story 6 Best Open Source Alternatives to Microsoft Office for Linux itsfoss 17/10/2017 - 2:13pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 1:23pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 10:46am
Story Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 10:45am
Story Software and howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 10:44am
Story GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Devices Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2017 - 10:43am

Linux 4.13.7

Filed under
Android

I'm announcing the release of the 4.13.7 kernel.

All users of the 4.13 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.13.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.13.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Raspberry Pi 3 based laptop features DIY hacking bay

Filed under
Linux

Pi-top has revised its RPi based laptop with a 14-inch HD screen and a slide-off keyboard that reveals a cooling unit and DIY space for a breadboard kit.

Pi-top’s Raspberry Pi driven laptop has received a major upgrade with a new model with a slightly larger 14-inch, HD screen and a 6 to 8 hour battery. The 2017 edition of the education-focused Pi-top features a modular design with a larger keyboard that slides forward to reveal a Raspberry Pi 3 with a new heatsink. It also includes an empty bay for DIY hacking, which can be filled with components from a free Inventor’s Kit. This DIY kit includes a breadboard, a motion sensor, LEDs, and a microphone, all mounted on a magnetic sliding rail.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM

Filed under
Development
GNOME
BSD
  • Modern Text Editor Design

    .

    Gtk4 development is heating up, and we are starting to see a toolkit built like a game engine. That’s pretty cool. But how will that change how we write editors? Should it?

    In the Gtk3 cycle, I added support to GtkTextView that would render using Alex’s GtkPixelCache. It helped us amortize the cost of rendering into mostly just an XCopyArea() when drawing a frame. It’s why we have that nice 60fps two-finger-scrolling.

  • Policy hacking

    The hackfest was part of an effort to redefine how the GNOME Foundation operates and is perceived.

    [...]

    Until now, the board has largely operated in an executive mode: each meeting we decide on funding requests, trademark questions and whatever other miscellaneous issues come our way. While some of this decision-making responsibility is to be expected, it is also fair to say that the board spends too much time on small questions and not enough on bigger ones.

  • Coda revival

    Coda is a distributed file system developed as a research project at Carnegie Mellon University, descended from a older version of the Andrew File System. It got dropped from FreeBSD some five years ago, due to not having been adopted for a MPSAFE world. The focus for this current project is to bring it back into sufficiently workable shape that it could return to the kernel. It is currently in a working condition. Work is underway to test it better, fix whatever issues are found, and commit it to 12-CURRENT.

  • Google's Learning Software Learns to Write Learning Software

    In a project called AutoML, Google’s researchers have taught machine-learning software to build machine-learning software. In some instances, what it comes up with is more powerful and efficient than the best systems the researchers themselves can design. Google says the system recently scored a record 82 percent at categorizing images by their content. On the harder task of marking the location of multiple objects in an image, an important task for augmented reality and autonomous robots, the auto-generated system scored 43 percent. The best human-built system scored 39 percent.

  • Intel Begins Working On "Knights Mill" Support For LLVM/Clang

    Intel compiler engineers have begun mainlining "Knights Mill" enablement within the LLVM compiler stack.

    Knights Mill is the codename for an upcoming Xeon Phi expected for release later this quarter. Details on Knights Mill are relatively light but it will cater to deep learning / AI use-cases and more efficient than Knights Landing (KNL).

    Intel has previously said Knights Mill is capable of twice the performance of Knights Landing for floating point operations per cycle and there are also new/optimized instructions for 8-bit and 16-bit arithmetic.

KDE Celebrates Its 21st Birthday

Filed under
KDE

Today marks twenty-one years since the KDE project was founded.

It was on 14 October 1996 that the "Kool Desktop Environment" was founded by Matthias Ettrich. At the time he wanted KDE to be a "consistent, nice looking free desktop-environment."

Read more

Graphics and Games: AMDGPU DC, Vulkan, GOG

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • More Pre-4.15 AMDGPU DC Patches To Test Out This Weekend

    For Radeon RX Vega Linux users or those with newer Radeon GPUs and just wanting to make use of HDMI/DP audio, there are some new "AMDGPU DC" patches ready for testing this weekend.

    While AMDGPU DC is being staged as a pull request finally for Linux 4.15, the work hasn't yet settled down as AMD developers continue taming this massive code-base of more than 120,000 lines of code. Just recently in fact were another 100+ patches for this display code that allows Vega/Raven display support, HDMI/DP audio, atomic mode-setting, and other display feature updates long sought after by Radeon users.

  • Vulkan 1.0.63 Introduces Global Priority Support

    Vulkan 1.0.63 is now available as the latest minor update to this high performance graphics/compute API.

    As usual, Vulkan 1.0.63 is mostly made up of document corrections and clarifications. There is though one new extension.

  • Humble Bundle has been acquired by IGN

    This is rather unsettling to see, Humble Bundle has now officially joined with the massive media site IGN.

Haiku OS Is Still Chugging Along To Get Its First Official Release Out

Filed under
OS

The BeOS-inspired Haiku OS has been around since 2002 and its alpha release came out five years ago while the beta and first "R1" stable release are still being pursued.

This week the open-source operating system project published a new report entitled Where is Haiku R1?

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Microsoft Breaking the Law and Computer Security Woes

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

Mozilla 'Freemium' and Visual Impairment Simulator

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla might offer Freemium services in the future

    The whole idea seems to be in an early stage and it is quite possible that it won't come to fruition after careful examination. When asked what kind of services Mozilla was considering, Beard answered that the organization was exploring that. This is all the information that is available at this point in time.

  • Mozilla CEO says new Firefox browser delivers 'a big bang'

    There's another side as we start to look at products that we could potentially offer. Some of them start to look like services, exploring the freemium models. There'd be a free level always, but also some premium services offering.

  • NoCoffee: Visual Impairment Simulator

    Four years ago, on a snowy February day, Aaron Leventhal huddled in his unheated home and created a Chrome extension called NoCoffee. This extension allows users to experience web content through different lenses of visual impairments*.

Nokia and Apple Lost in Android Era

Filed under
Android

10 open source Linux robots from car-bots to humanoids

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linux robots come in all shapes and sizes from rovers to chatty humanoids. Here are 10 intriguing terrestrial robot kits with open software and hardware.

Back in 2014, we struggled to fill out our top 10 roundup of Linux-based robots and padded the list with conceptually similar autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In addition, many of those robots were proprietary or open source only on the software side. Today, however, it’s easy to fill out a top 10 list of Linux-based terrestrial robots that are open source in both software and hardware. In fact, we were forced to leave a number of worthy projects waiting in the wings.

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How do you dump the firmware from a "secure" voting machine? With a $15 open source hardware board

Filed under
Hardware
Security

One of the highlights of this year's Defcon conference in Vegas was the Voting Machine Hacking Village, where security researchers tore apart the "secure" voting machines America trusts its democracy to.

The Voting Machine Hacking Village just released its master report on the vulnerabilities they found, and the participants are talking about it on Twitter, including Joe Fitz's note that he dumped the firmware off a Accuvote TSX with one of Adafruit's $15 open source hardware FT232h breakout boards.

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Debian, Ubuntu, elementary OS, pfSense and Windows

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Free Software Activities in Jul-Sep 2017

    If you read Planet Debian often, you’ve probably noticed a trend of Free Software activity reports at the beginning of the month. First, those reports seemed a bit unamusing and lengthy, but since I take the time to read them I’ve learnt a lot of things, and now I’m amazed at the amount of work that people are doing for Free Software. Indeed, I knew already that many people are doing lots of work. But reading those reports gives you an actual view of how much it is.

  • OpenStack Development Summary – October 13, 2017

    Welcome to the seventh Ubuntu OpenStack development summary!

    This summary is intended to be a regular communication of activities and plans happening in and around Ubuntu OpenStack, covering but not limited to the distribution and deployment of OpenStack on Ubuntu.

    If there is something that you would like to see covered in future summaries, or you have general feedback on content please feel free to reach out to me (jamespage on Freenode IRC) or any of the OpenStack Engineering team at Canonical!

  • elementary OS 0.5 "Juno" GNU/Linux Distro Could Use Ubuntu's Snappy Technologies

    The guys over elementary OS, the popular GNU/Linux distribution based on Ubuntu, were interviewed recently by Canonical's Sarah Dickinson about upcoming integration of Snap packages into their infrastructure.

    As you are aware, there are three main universal binary packages available for GNU/Linux distributions, Snappy, Flatpak, and AppImage, and OS maintainers are free to implement which one they think it's best for their users, or even more of them.

    In the interview, elementary's devs revealed the fact that they want to go with Ubuntu's Snappy technologies to provide their users with a modern and secure confined app format because of the extra layer of security Snaps provide by design.

  • pfSense 2.4 BSD Operating System Debuts with New Installer, Drops 32-Bit Images

    Rubicon Communications' Jim Pingle announced the release of the pfSense 2.4.0 operating system, a major release that introduces support for new devices, new features, and numerous improvements.

    Based on the latest FreeBSD 11.1 operating system, the pfSense 2.4 release comes with an all-new installer based on bsdinstall and featuring support for the ZFS file system, UEFI machines, as well as multiple types of partition layouts, including the widely used GPT and BIOS.

  • Dutch privacy regulator says Windows 10 breaks the law

    The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law.

    To comply with the law, the DPA says that Microsoft needs to get valid user consent: this means the company must be clearer about what data is collected and how that data is processed. The regulator also complains that the Windows 10 Creators Update doesn't always respect previously chosen settings about data collection. In the Creators Update, Microsoft introduced new, clearer wording about the data collection—though this language still wasn't explicit about what was collected and why—and it forced everyone to re-assert their privacy choices through a new settings page. In some situations, though, that page defaulted to the standard Windows options rather than defaulting to the settings previously chosen.

Security: Australia, IRS, and Grafeas

Filed under
Security
  • Australian defense firm was hacked and F-35 data stolen, DOD confirms

    The Australian Cyber Security Centre noted in its just-issued 2017 Threat Report that a small Australian defense company "with contracting links to national security projects" had been the victim of a cyber-espionage attack detected last November. "ACSC analysis confirmed that the adversary had sustained access to the network for an extended period of time and had stolen a significant amount of data," the ACSC report stated. "The adversary remained active on the network at the time."

    More details of the breach were revealed on Wednesday at an IT conference in Sydney. ASD Incident Response Manager Mitchell Clarke said, "The compromise was extensive and extreme." The attacker behind the breach has been internally referred to at the Australian Signals Directorate as "APT Alf" (named for a character in Australia's long-running television show Home and Away, not the US television furry alien). Alf stole approximately 30 gigabytes of data, including data related to Australia's involvement in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, as well as data on the P-8 Poseidon patrol plane, planned future Australian Navy ships, the C-130 Hercules cargo plane, and the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) bomb. The breach began in July of 2016.

  • After second bungle, IRS suspends Equifax’s “taxpayer identity” contract

    The tax-collecting agency is now temporarily suspending the contract because of another Equifax snafu. The Equifax site was maliciously manipulated again, this time to deliver fraudulent Adobe Flash updates, which, when clicked, infected visitors' computers with adware that was detected by just three of 65 antivirus providers. The development means that at least for now, taxpayers cannot open new Secure Access accounts with the IRS. Secure Access allows taxpayers to retrieve various online tax records and provides other "tax account tools" to those who have signed up.

  • Google, IBM Partner to Tighten Container Security
  • Grafeas, new open-source API for the software supply chain, released

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Weblate 2.17
  • 7 Best eBook Readers for Linux

    Lately, the demand for digital books has increased as people find it more comfortable in reading a book on their handheld devices, Kindle or PC. When it comes to the Linux users, there are various ebook apps that will serve your purpose in reading and organizing your ebook collections.

    In this article, we have compiled seven best ebook readers for Linux. These ebook readers are best suited for pdf, epubs and other ebook formats.

  • How to write/create a Ubuntu .iso to a bootable USB device on Linux using dd command
  • Check disk usage at the command line with du
  • Install Redis and Redis PHP on cPanel
  • Qt 4 and 5 and OpenSSL1.0 removal
  • GLib tools rewrite

    If you’re still stuck with Autotools, though, you may also want to consider dropping glib-genmarshal, and use the FFI-based generic marshaller in your signal definitions — which comes at a small performance cost, but if you’re putting signal emission inside a performance-critical path you should just be ashamed of yourself.

    For enumerations, you could use something like this macro, which I tend to employ in all my projects with just few, small enumeration types, and where involving a whole separate pass at parsing C files is kind of overkill. Ideally, GLib would ship its own version, so maybe it’ll be replaced in a new version.

Red Hat's Growth and New Fedora Packages

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat continues steady march toward $5 billion revenue goal

    The last time I spoke to Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, in June 2016, he had set a pretty audacious goal for his company to achieve $5 billion in revenue. At the time, that seemed a bit far-fetched. After all, his company had just become the first open-source company to surpass $2 billion in revenue. Getting to five represented a significant challenge because, as he pointed out, the bigger you get, the harder it becomes to keep the growth trajectory going.

    But the company has continued to thrive and is on track to pass $3 billion in revenue some time in the next couple of quarters. Red Hat is best known for creating a version of Linux designed specifically for the enterprise, but it has begun adapting to the changing world out there with cloud and containers — and as its RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) customers start to change the way they work (ever so slowly), they are continuing to use Red Hat for these new technologies. As Whitehurst told me, that’s not a coincidence.

  • New packages in Fedora: rtags, renderdoc

Kdenlive 17.08.2 and Krita 3.3.1

Filed under
KDE
  • Kdenlive 17.08.2 released

    The second minor release of the 17.08 series is out adding a rotate from image center option in the Transform effect among other usability improvements. In other news the dev team continues making progress for the much anticipated 17.12 release. Start the countdown!

  • Krita 3.3.1 Brings Fixes for Important Regressions to the Digital Painting App

    Only two weeks after the release of the significant Krita 3.3 update, the popular open-source and cross-platform digital painting app received a bug fix release that addresses some important regressions.

    Krita 3.3.1 is a minor maintenance update that fixes two important regressions, including a crash that occurred when restarting Krita after closing it with the reference images docker set to floating, and a bug that won't allow users to import unzipped .kra backup files or .kra files which were then archived manually as a zip file.

Pi-Top updates its modular, Raspberry Pi-powered laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi’s single-board computers are surprisingly versatile devices that can be used for all sort of things ranging from desktop PCs to game consoles to smart speakers. Hackers have also been building Raspberry Pi-powered laptops for years, and back in 2014 a UK-based team launched one of the more interesting versions, since the Pi-Top allowed you to modify the case designs yourself using a 3D printer.

Now company is updating its hardware with a new modular Pi-Top model that features a bigger, better display, a sliding keyboard that makes it easy to access the system’s insides, and an “inventor’s kit” to get you started with developing hardware projects.

Read more

Also: 21-inch capacitive panel PC taps quad-core Bay Trail SoC

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Budgie 17.10 Releases with Budgie Desktop 10.4, Night Light, and More

Ubuntu Budgie is a more recent officially recognized flavor of the popular and free Ubuntu operating system, and today it has been updated to version 17.10 as part of the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) release. Read more

BeagleBone based 3D printer focuses on ease of use

The “Voladd 3D Printer” features a Linux-driven BeagleBone SBC that connects to a cloud-based sharing site, plus a unique cartridge and cooling system. San Sebastián, Spain based Voladd has won Kickstarter funding for a Voladd 3D printer that runs Debian Linux on a BeagleBone Black single board computer. Like several other Linux-based printers we’ve seen (see farther below) the Voladd connects to a cloud service, and does not require an attached computer. The printer stands out with its mobile app remote control, as well as a streamlined cloud interface that lets you download one of thousands of free designs in 25 categories and share designs and printer access with others. Kickstarter pricing starts with early bird packages of 499 Euros ($591), with shipments due in December. Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 Released! See What's New in Ubuntu 17.10

Ubunt 17.10 has been released. Check out the new features in Ubuntu 17.10 and see how to upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10. Read more

OSS: Open Source Initiative, Open Xchange, OpenOffice, MakerBot

  • Open Source Initiative Welcomes Cumulus Networks As Premium Sponsor
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the internationally recognized home of the open source software movement working to raise awareness and adoption of open source software, announced today the generous sponsorship of Cumulus Networks. Cumulus joins OSI's growing community of corporations that recognize the importance of not only investing in open source software projects and development, but also building a diverse ecosystem that promotes collaboration, enables innovation, and ensures quality. Cumulus Networks has a strong tradition of internally-driven development of original open source software, including most notably, contributions to the Linux kernel that complete the data center feature set for Linux such as Virtual Routing and Forwarding (VRF), MPLS, MLAG infrastructure, multicast routing features, etc. Cumulus' most recent open source effort is FRRouting, co-developed by a group of contributing companies in the open networking space, to enhance routing protocols. Cumulus Networks has also been a key driving member of the Open Network Install Environment (ONIE) with contributions to the Open Compute Project, Prescriptive Topology Manager--which simplifies the deployment of large L3 networks--and ifupdown2, a rewrite of Debian's tool for configuring networks that greatly simplifies large, complicated networking configurations.
  • Let's dig into how open source could KO the Silicon Valley chat silos
    There's never been a better opportunity for the world to start untangling itself from the giant Silicon Valley data harvesters than now. Last week, we revealed a plan to embed open-source chat into three quarters of the world's IMAP servers. And this may be an important development. Maybe. Google, Yahoo!, Apple and Microsoft handle around half the world's email, some 2.5 billion users, while open-source IMAP servers handle the rest, around 2.5-3 billion. Of these the Dovecot open-source server, part of the German business Open Xchange, is installed on 75 per cent of boxes. Quietly drop IM into the mix, and you've given the world a reason to leave WhatsApp.
  • Open source, agility powering enterprise IT
    Looking back over the past decade, history has certainly demonstrated that trying to predict the pace and nature of technology development is a near impossible task, writes Quentin Barnard, lead architect at redPanda Software. While analysts, business leaders and policymakers have certainly made wise predictions, businesses and individuals have to remain agile, responsive and open-minded to a wide possibility of outcomes and developments. It is also helpful, however, to reflect on key trends that have emerged in recent times — and to use this information to prepare for the years ahead. For software developers and development houses, several prominent themes emerged in 2017.
  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Five Years of Apache® OpenOffice™ as a Top-Level Project
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the five-year anniversary of Apache® OpenOfficeTM, the leading Open Source office document productivity suite.
  • MakerBot Labs: new experimental 3D printing platform is MakerBot's olive branch to open source community
    New York 3D printing company MakerBot has launched MakerBot Labs, an experimental platform with open APIs, custom print modes, and an online resource-sharing site. The platform purportedly allows users to “push the limits” of 3D printing.
  • MakerBot attempts to embrace the open-source community with its new Labs platform
    The topic of open source has been a touchy one for MakerBot over the past decade. The one-time 3D-printing darling was the subject of some serious smack talk among the maker community when it stopped disclosing machine design in 2012 — a departure from the company’s roots as in the open-source Rep-Rap community. Announced this week, MakerBot Labs doesn’t mark a full return to those roots, but it does find the company carving out a niche for the DIY community that was once a driving force in its rapid growth. “I understand the history,” CEO Nadav Goshen told TechCrunch during a phone call this week, “This is one step in the direction. It’s a step to understand that there are limitations to openness. Openness for us doesn’t mean we have to compromise on quality or ease of use. We’re trying to take responsibility for both.”