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Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2018 - 2:09pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2018 - 9:36am
Story Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese? Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2018 - 2:16am
Story Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded) Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2018 - 2:02am
Story FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs) Roy Schestowitz 18/02/2018 - 1:59am
Story Linux: To recurse or not Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 7:50pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 5:32pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:54am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:30am
Story Logstash 6.2.0 Released, Alfresco Grabbed by Private Equity Firm Roy Schestowitz 17/02/2018 - 8:27am

Canonical: Ubuntu 18.04 Will Collect Data, Adds 'Minimal iInstall', MAAS, Mesa, GLVND

Filed under
Ubuntu

Graphics: Wayland Protocols 1.13, Mesa, AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • wayland-protocols 1.13

    wayland-protocols 1.13 is now available.

  • Wayland Protocols 1.13 Introduces New Input Timestamp Protocol

    Jonas Ådahl on Wednesday announced Wayland-Protocols 1.13, the collection of stable and unstable protocols to Wayland.

    The single major change to Wayland Protocols 1.13 is the introduction of the input-timestamps protocol. This protocol extension is for providing high resolution timestamps for input events.

  • Intel's Mesa Driver Gets Patches For New EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch

    Open-source Intel driver developer Francisco Jerez has sent out a set of 15 patches implementing a new version of the EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch OpenGL extension.

    EXT_shader_framebuffer_fetch in its current form on the OpenGL registry is for OpenGL ES 2.0+ and allows a fragment shader to read existing frame-buffer data as input. This is intended to allow for more advanced compositing operations.

  • Marek Updates OpenGL 3.1 ARB_compatibility Support For Mesa

    Last October well known open-source AMD driver developer Marek Olšák began work on OpenGL compatibility profile support for Mesa. This work is about OpenGL 3.1 with ARB_compatibility support, something generally relevant for workstation OpenGL users and one of the few remaining advantages of AMD's current proprietary OpenGL driver.

  • AMDVLK/XGL Gets Vega Enhancements, LLPC Optimizations

    AMD developers working on their official, cross-platform XGL/AMDVLK driver code have pushed out another batch of changes for benefiting their official AMD Vulkan Linux driver.

    The first noted change is "enhance GFX9 support", in other words, the Vega GPU support should be in better shape but they didn't provide any specifics. This is good news considering my latest AMDVLK vs. RADV Vulkan driver testing from this weekend still showed several areas where the AMDVLK driver was lagging behind RADV in Radeon RX Vega 64 performance or even not working for some games.

Linux: CI Testing, seL4, Meltdown and Spectre Mitigations, and More LWN Coverage (Now Outside Paywall)

Filed under
Linux
  • Initial Icelake Support Heading To Linux 4.17, Many Bug Fixes Thanks To CI Testing
  • Mixed-criticality support in seL4

    Linux tries to be useful for a wide variety of use cases, but there are some situations where it may not be appropriate; safety-critical deployments with tight timing constraints would be near the top of the list for many people. On the other hand, systems that can run safety-critical code in a provably correct manner tend to be restricted in functionality and often have to be dedicated to a single task. In a linux.conf.au 2018 talk, Gernot Heiser presented work that is being done with the seL4 microkernel system to safely support complex systems in a provably safe manner.

    The world contains an increasing number of "cyberphysical systems" implementing various types of safety-critical functionality. Fly-by-wire systems for aircraft and factory automation systems are a couple of examples. These systems are subject to an expensive safety-assurance process with costs that scale linearly (at least) with each line of code. When one considers that an Airbus A380 jetliner contains around 120 million lines of code, one can understand that developing that code can be a costly business.

  • Meltdown and Spectre mitigations — a February update

    The initial panic over the Meltdown and Spectre processor vulnerabilities has faded, and work on mitigations in the kernel has slowed since our mid-January report. That work has not stopped, though. Fully equipping the kernel to protect systems from these vulnerabilities is a task that may well require years. Read on for an update on the current status of that work.

  • 4.16 Merge window part 1

    As of this writing, just over 6,700 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 4.16 development cycle. Given that there are a number of significant trees yet to be pulled, the early indications are that 4.16 will be yet another busy development cycle. What follows is a summary of the significant changes merged in the first half of this merge window.

Mozilla News: Performance, Marnie Pasciuto-Wood, Tracking Protection, CSS Grid, Firefox 59 Beta 10 Testday Today

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Performance Update #1

    In an attempt to fill the shoes of Ehsan’s excellent Quantum Flow Newsletters1, I’ve started to keep track of interesting performance bugs that have been tackled over the past little while.

    I don’t expect I’ll be able to put together such excellent essays on performance issues in Firefox, but I can certainly try to help to raise the profile of folks helping to make Firefox faster.

  • Welcome Marnie to the Test Pilot Team!

    Late last year, the Test Pilot team welcomed a new engineering program manager, Marnie Pasciuto-Wood. In this post, Marnie talks about what it’s been like joining Mozilla and what keeps her busy and inspired outside of work.

  • A Perspective: Firefox Quantum’s Tracking Protection Gives Users The Right To Be Curious

    In the physical world, we don’t wear our ID on our foreheads. This is convenient because we can walk around with a reasonable expectation of privacy and let our curiosity take us to interesting places. That shoe store you sauntered into because they had a pair that caught your eye has no idea who you are, where you live, or anything about you. More importantly, any attempt by that shoe store to have an employee follow you around would not only be impractical, but would be met with some serious side-eye from potential customers.

  • CSS Grid for UI Layouts

    CSS Grid is a great layout tool for content-driven websites that include long passages of text, and it has tremendous value for a variety of traditional UI layouts as well. In this article I’ll show you how to use CSS Grid to improve application layouts that need to respond and adapt to user interactions and changing conditions, and always have your panels scroll properly.

  • Firefox 59 Beta 10 Testday, February 16th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, February 16th, we are organizing Firefox 59 Beta 10 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on Find Toolbar and Search Suggestions.

AMD Ryzen 3 2200G + Ryzen 5 2400G Linux CPU Performance, 21-Way Intel/AMD Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I posted some initial Linux benchmarks of the Ryzen 5 2400G Raven Ridge APU when looking at the Vega 11 graphics, but for those curious about the CPU performance potential of the Ryzen 5 2400G and its ~$100 Ryzen 3 2200G sibling, here are our first CPU benchmarks of these long-awaited AMD APUs. These two current Raven Ridge desktop APUs are compared to a total of 21 different Intel and AMD processors dating back to older Kaveri APUs and FX CPUs and Ivy Bridge on the Intel side.

Read more

Also: Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 Officially Released For Open-Source, Cross-OS Benchmarking

Jupyter and Junior Developers

Filed under
Development
  • Jupyter: notebooks for education and collaboration

    The popular interpreted language Python shares a mode of interaction with many other languages, from Lisp to APL to Julia: the REPL (read-eval-print-loop) allows the user to experiment with and explore their code, while maintaining a workspace of global variables and functions. This is in contrast with languages such as Fortran and C, which must be compiled and run as complete programs (a mode of operation available to the REPL-enabled languages as well). But using a REPL is a solitary task; one can write a program to share based on their explorations, but the REPL session itself not easily shareable. So REPLs have gotten more sophisticated over time, evolving into shareable notebooks, such as what IPython, and its more recent descendant, Jupyter, have. Here we look at Jupyter: its history, notebooks, and how it enables better collaboration in languages well beyond its Python roots.

  • Who Killed The Junior Developer?

    I’m not sure what the industry-wide solution is. I’m not sure whether companies that lack junior devs are unbalanced or smart. The reality is that most software developers don’t stay one place very long, so maybe it doesn’t make sense to invest a lot in training someone? Or maybe the industry should ask itself why people keep hopping jobs? Maybe it’s because a lot of them suck, or for a lot of us it’s the only way to advance our salary. I can either wait for a stupid, meaningless yearly “performance review” to bump me up 1% or take my resume and interview elsewhere and get 10% or more.

    It’s not just a sign that an individual company is broken, it’s a sign the entire industry is broken.

Security: Salon 'Malware', Georgia's Plan, Let's Encrypt, USB, and Hardware Bugs

Filed under
Security
  • Salon Offers To Remove Ads If Visitors Help Mine Cryptocurrency

    As we've been discussing, the rise of stealth cryptocurrency miners embedded on websites has become a notable problem. In some instances, websites are being hacked and embedded with stealth cryptocurrency miners that quickly gobble up visitors' CPU cycles without their knowledge. That's what happened to Showtime recently when two different domains were found to be utilizing the Coinhive miner to hijack visitor broswers without users being informed. Recent reports indicate that thousands of government websites have also been hijacked and repurposed in this fashion via malware.

    But numerous websites are also now exploring such miners voluntarily as an alternative revenue stream. One major problem however: many aren't telling site visitors this is even happening. And since some implementations of such miners can hijack massive amounts of CPU processing power while sipping a non-insubstantial amount of electricity, that's a problem.

  • Georgia Senate Thinks It Can Fix Its Election Security Issues By Criminalizing Password Sharing, Security Research

    When bad things happen, bad laws are sure to follow. The state of Georgia has been through some tumultuous times, electorally-speaking. After a presidential election plagued with hacking allegations, the Georgia Secretary of State plunged ahead with allegations of his own. He accused the DHS of performing ad hoc penetration testing on his office's firewall. At no point was he informed the DHS might try to breach his system and the DHS, for its part, was less than responsive when questioned about its activities. It promised to get back to the Secretary of State but did not confirm or deny hacking attempts the state had previously opted out of.

    To make matter worse, there appeared to be evidence the state's voting systems had been compromised. A misconfigured server left voter records exposed, resulting in a lawsuit against state election officials. Somehow, due to malice or stupidity, a server containing key evidence needed in the lawsuit was mysteriously wiped clean, just days after the lawsuit was filed.

  • Let's Encrypt Hits 50 Million Active Certificates and Counting

    In yet another milestone on the path to encrypting the web, Let’s Encrypt has now issued over 50 million active certificates. Depending on your definition of “website,” this suggests that Let’s Encrypt is protecting between about 23 million and 66 million websites with HTTPS (more on that below). Whatever the number, it’s growing every day as more and more webmasters and hosting providers use Let’s Encrypt to provide HTTPS on their websites by default.

  • Linux systems can still be hacked via USB sticks

    Linux systems could be a risk from malware on USB memory sticks, according to security researchers.

    The bug affects users running the KDE Plasma desktop environment, which is widely used in GNU/Linux distributions. The issue was discovered in soliduiserver/deviceserviceaction.cpp in KDE Plasma Workspace before 5.12.0.

  • Spectre & KPTI Get More Fixes In Linux 4.16, Offsets Some KVM Performance Losses

    While we are past the Linux 4.16 merge window, more Spectre and Meltdown related improvements and changes are still being allowed into the kernel, similar to all the KPTI/Retpoline work that landed late in Linux 4.15. On Wednesday was another big batch of KPTI and Spectre work that has already been merged.

  • Kali Linux Ethical Hacking OS Getting Fix for Meltdown & Spectre with Linux 4.15

IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 118 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

this is the official release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 118. It comes with a number of security and bug fixes as well as some new features. Please note the that we are dropping support for some add-ons.

Read more

Min: An Open Source Web Browser for Minimalists

Filed under
Software

Min is an open source web browser with a clean UI and minimalist look. Despite being minimal, Min packs enough features for a standard web browsing experience.
Read more

Servers? We don't need no stinkin' servers!

Filed under
Server

OK, so we'll always need some servers.

But with the rise of virtual machines (VM)s and container technologies such as Docker, combined with DevOps and cloud orchestration to automatically manage ever-larger numbers of server applications, serverless computing is becoming real.

Read more

Understanding SELinux labels for container runtimes

Filed under
Linux
Server

SELinux provides great filesystem separation for your container runtimes, but you need to be careful when running multiple container runtimes on the same machine at the same time, and also careful to clean up any content left on a host when you remove a container.

Read more

Canonical Wants to Collect Some Data from Ubuntu Users to Improve New Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

The information Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop engineers need to improve certain aspects of the Linux-based operating system about includes users' setups, installed software, Ubuntu flavor and version, network connectivity, CPU family, RAM, disk size, screen resolution, GPU vendor and model, as well as OEM manufacturer.

In addition, the company says that it needs to know your location, yet it promises to not store IP addresses of users. Other information that would be collected includes total installation time, automatic login info, selected disk layout, LivePatch enablement, and if you choose to install updates or third-party software during installation.

Read more

Also: Canonical Plans to Release Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS (Xenial Xerus) on March 1, 2018

Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Planned For Release 1 March

Ubuntu Wants To Collect Data About Your System–Starting From 18.04 LTS

Solus 4 Is Coming Soon with Experimental Wayland Session for GNOME, Linux 4.15

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Solus Project's Joshua Strobl posted today more details about the upcoming Solus 4 desktop operating system and some of the new features that will be integrated. These include a revamped Software Center with the latest Linux Driver Management for better hardware driver support, Hotspot support, Budgie 10.4.1, MATE 1.20, and an experimental Wayland session for the GNOME edition.

"Wayland will not be the default for Solus Budgie or Solus GNOME, however GNOME users will be able to install a separate session package if they wish to test and experiment with Wayland support," says Joshua Strobl. "During my testing, I have not found the quality of the GNOME + Wayland to be sufficient enough to be provided as a default experience for our users."

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A look at Linux Mint 18.3 KDE – The Last KDE Linux Mint

Filed under
KDE
Linux

I wrote an article a while ago about how KDE was being removed as an official flavour of Linux Mint past 18.3, and so I thought perhaps a quick review of 18.3 KDE was in order. Linux Mint 18.3 KDE is based on Ubuntu 16.06 LTS.

Read more

i.MX6 UL based COM/SBC hybrid has FPGA with programmable ZPU core

Filed under
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

Technologic’s rugged, open-spec “TS-4100” COM/SBC hybrid runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL, and offers a microSD slot, 4GB eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port, optional WiFi/BT and baseboard, and an FPGA with a programmable ZPU core for offloading real-time tasks.

Technologic Systems has begun sampling its first i.MX6 UL (UltraLite) based board, which is also its first computer-on-module that can double as an SBC. The 75 x 55mm TS-4100 module features a microSD slot, onboard eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port with power support, and optional WiFi and Bluetooth. Like most Technologic boards, such as the popular, i.MX6-based TS-4900 module, it offers long-term support and -40 to 85°C support, and ships with schematics and open source Linux images (Ubuntu 16.04 and Debian Jesse).

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Security: Windows, Salon, Fraud. Skype and More

Filed under
Security
  • Critical Telegram flaw under attack disguised malware as benign images [Ed: Windows]

    The flaw, which resided in the Windows version of the messaging app, allowed attackers to disguise the names of attached files, researchers from security firm Kaspersky Lab said in a blog post. By using the text-formatting standard known as Unicode, attackers were able to cause characters in file names to appear from right to left, instead of the left-to-right order that's normal for most Western languages.

  • Salon to ad blockers: Can we use your browser to mine cryptocurrency?

    Salon explains what's going on in a new FAQ. "How does Salon make money by using my processing power?" the FAQ says. "We intend to use a small percentage of your spare processing power to contribute to the advancement of technological discovery, evolution, and innovation. For our beta program, we'll start by applying your processing power to help support the evolution and growth of blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies."

  • Why children are now prime targets for identity theft [sic] [iophk: "the real name for this is "fraud" and there are already existing laws on it"]

    SSA believed this change would make it more difficult for thieves to “guess” someone’s SSN by looking at other public information available for that person. However, now that an SSN is not tied to additional data points, such as a location or year of birth, it becomes harder for financial institutions, health care providers, and others to verify that the person using the SSN is in fact the person to whom it was issued.

    In other words: Thieves now target SSNs issued after this change as they know your 6-year-old niece or your 4-year-old son will not have an established credit file.

  • Microsoft won't plug a huge zero-day in Skype because it'd be too much work

    The bug in the automatic updater (turd polisher) for the Windows desktop app has a ruddy great hole in it that will let dodgy DLLs through.

  • ‘I Lived a Nightmare:’ SIM Hijacking Victims Share Their Stories

    The bug itself didn’t expose anything too sensitive. No passwords, social security numbers, or credit card data was exposed. But it did expose customers’ email addresses, their billing account numbers, and the phone’s IMSI numbers, standardized unique number that identifies subscribers. Just by knowing (or guessing) customer’s phone numbers, hackers could get their target’s data.

    Once they had that, they could impersonate them with T-Mobile’s customer support staff and steal their phone numbers. This is how it works: a criminal calls T-Mobile, pretends to be you, convinces the customer rep to issue a new SIM card for your number, the criminal activates it, and they take control of your number.

AMD Vega 8 Graphics Performance On Linux With The Ryzen 3 2200G

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I posted the initial Ryzen 5 2400G Vega 11 Linux graphics benchmarks while for your viewing please today -- as well as this morning's 21-way Intel/AMD CPU Linux comparison that featured these new Raven Ridge APUs -- the results now completed are initial OpenGL and Vulkan performance figures for the Vega 8 graphics found on the Ryzen 3 2200G.

Read more

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Software and Games Leftovers

  • LXD Weekly Status #35
    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while. We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week. On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.
  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released
    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!
  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade
    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.
  •  
  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience
    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.
  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price
    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.
  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th
    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.

KDE and GNOME Leftovers

  • Kdenlive Café tonight and beta AppImage
    The last months for Kdenlive have been very quiet from the outside – we were not very active on the bugtracker, did not make a lot of announcements, and the 17.12.x release cycle only contained very few minor bugfixes. The main reason for this was the huge work that went behind the scenes for a major code refactoring that was required to allow further developments. So after more than a year working on it, we hope to get ready for the 18.04 release!
  • [Krita] Interview with Christine Garner
    I did Archaeology in University and I love history, mythology, folklore and nature. I’ve always been drawing from an early age. I graduated in 2003 with an archaeology degree. I taught myself digital art and web coding skills for fun and practical reasons. I used to do self-employed web design and admin type jobs, but in 2013 I became disillusioned with my life and had depression. I took a Foundation art course in 2013 deciding to pursue my artistic passions instead.
  • Qt 5.11 Brings New Accessibility Backend on Windows
    Accessibility technology encompasses assistive tools such as screen readers, magnifiers and braille displays, as well as APIs and frameworks that allow applications to expose elements of their UI to such tools.
  • CSS Grid
    This would totally have been a tweet or a facebook post, but I’ve decided to invest a little more energy and post these on my blog, accessible to everybody. Getting old, I guess. We’re all mortal and the web isn’t open by its own. In the past few days I’ve been learning about CSS grid while redesigning Flatpak and Flathub sites (still coming). And with the knowledge of really grokking only a fraction of it, I’m in love.

OSS: Project Names, Events, NSF and Mozilla, ArangoDB, Oracle, Bitcoin and More

  • Choosing project names: 4 key considerations
    Working on a new open source project, you're focused on the code—getting that great new idea released so you can share it with the world. And you'll want to attract new contributors, so you need a terrific name for your project. We've all read guides for creating names, but how do you go about choosing the right one? Keeping that cool science fiction reference you're using internally might feel fun, but it won't mean much to new users you're trying to attract. A better approach is to choose a name that's memorable to new users and developers searching for your project. Names set expectations. Your project's name should showcase its functionality in the ecosystem and explain to users what your story is. In the crowded open source software world, it's important not to get entangled with other projects out there. Taking a little extra time now, before sending out that big announcement, will pay off later.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Community DevRoom Recap: Simon Phipps & Rich Sands
    It’s been a few weeks now since FOSDEM and if you didn’t have a chance to attend or watch the  livestream of the FOSDEM 2018 Community DevRoom, Leslie my co-chair, and I are doing a round up summary on posts on each of the talks to bring you the video and the highlights of each presentation. You can read the preview post of Rich Sands and Simon Phipps pre FOSDEM blog post here.
  • Scheduling Voxxed Days Zurich 2018 with OptaPlanner
    My name is Mario Fusco and I’m honored to be the Program Committee Lead of Voxxed Days Zurich for the third year in a row. Reading, evaluating, discussing, and selecting from the 200+ proposals that arrive every year is a long and challenging process. I must admit, I largely underestimated the task the first year I started doing it. It’s necessary to evaluate not only the quality of every submission, but also how they fit together. In the end, the worst part is having to reject so many incredible proposals because there are a limited number of slots. However, once all the talks have been selected and all the approval and rejection emails have been sent, the process is still not complete. Now it is time to take all the accepted talks and schedule the actual program. Even for a moderate sized event like Voxxed Days Zurich (the conference lasts only one day and we have four parallel tracks), this is not a trivial task. There are many constraints and nice-to-haves that you may need to consider. For example, some speakers will arrive late in the morning or will have to leave early in the afternoon.  Some talks require different room capacities.  Two talks belonging to the same track must not be scheduled at the same time. There are many more variables to this process.
  • 20 Big Ideas to Connect the Unconnected
    Last year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Mozilla announced the Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges: $2 million in prizes for big ideas to connect the unconnected across the U.S. Today, we’re announcing our first set of winners: 20 bright ideas from Detroit, Cleveland, Albuquerque, New York City, and beyond. The winners are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack. Winning projects were developed by veteran researchers, enterprising college students, and everyone in-between. What do all these projects have in common? They’re affordable, scalable, open-source, and secure.
  • ArangoDB publishes industry-wide open source NoSQL performance benchmark
    ArangoDB, a provider of native multi-model NoSQL database solutions, announced the latest findings of its open source NoSQL performance benchmark series. To enable vendors to respond to the results and contribute improvements, ArangoDB has published the necessary scripts required to repeat the benchmark.
  • Can one 'multi-model' database rule them all?
    ArangoDB open source NoSQL performance benchmark series is one such open study.
  • Oracle-Supported Port of DTrace?, Linux Foundation Announces Akraino, New Feral Interactive Game and Qt 5.11 Alpha
    For those of us who have been holding out to see an Oracle-supported port of DTrace on Linux, that time is nearly here. Oracle just re-licensed the system instrumentation tool from the original CDDL to GPLv2.
  • Kernel patch releases, WineHQ, OpenIndiana project, FreeBSD Unix distribution, Xubuntu community contest
    The OpenIndiana project is still alive and well with a recent announcement of migrating the project to GCC 6.4. Unfortunately, this version does not cover the Spectre/Meltdown vulnerabilities, although the next version planned is 7.3 which will cover these hot issues.
  • Satoshi’s Vision? Bitcoin Cash Gets It Wrong, Says Max Keiser
    The movement was formally founded in 1983 by Richard Stallman with the launch of the GNU Project, which was founded on the idea that proprietary software harms users to the benefit of large corporations.
  • Bitcoin's Developers Are Debating A Change To Its Open License
    Ever since its launch last August, bitcoin has had an antagonistic relationship with its offshoot, bitcoin cash. But their battle may have provided a trigger to seek ways to protect bitcoin’s core code from indiscriminate use.
  • A new Maryland bill would allow students to buy textbooks tax-free twice a year [Ed: This is a reaction to open-source (Open Access) books and maybe an attempt to extinguish such state-level initiatives]
    University of Maryland student Kayla Little has wanted to be a doctor since she was 11 years old — but a nationwide rise in textbook prices has proved to be an obstacle to her success. "I've wanted to go into medicine for the longest [time], and I really don't want to give that up for books," said Little, who hopes to go to medical school and become an orthopedic surgeon for a professional sports team.
  • How the Grateful Dead were a precursor to Creative Commons licensing
    From its founding in 1965, the Grateful Dead was always an unusual band. Rising amidst the counterculture movement in the San Francisco Bay Area, the Grateful Dead’s music had roots in multiple styles and genres but did not lend itself to easy categorization. Was it psychedelic? Folk? Blues? Country? Yes, it was all of these and more. The band frequently performed well-known public domain songs, but they made the songs their own. Members of the band could effortlessly play across traditional and diverse styles. At concerts, they often performed songs that sounded familiar at first but grew and evolved across styles and genres. Songs often turned into lengthy jam sessions in which musicians played off one another, discovering new musical motifs and expanding them together.

Rust things I miss in C and learning to program is getting harder

  • Rust things I miss in C
    Librsvg feels like it is reaching a tipping point, where suddenly it seems like it would be easier to just port some major parts from C to Rust than to just add accessors for them. Also, more and more of the meat of the library is in Rust now. I'm switching back and forth a lot between C and Rust these days, and C feels very, very primitive these days.
  • Learning to program is getting harder

    I have written several books that use Python to explain topics like Bayesian Statistics and Digital Signal Processing. Along with the books, I provide code that readers can download from GitHub. In order to work with this code, readers have to know some Python, but that's not enough. They also need a computer with Python and its supporting libraries, they have to know how to download code from GitHub, and then they have to know how to run the code they downloaded.

    And that's where a lot of readers get into trouble.