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Tuesday, 14 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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9 Simple Ways to Effectively use Less Command in Linux

Filed under
Linux

Learn to use less command in Linux for viewing large files and tracking log files. Most common usage of the less command explained in this tutorial.
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Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Women in IT Awards USA winner: Margaret Dawson, Red Hat

    Margaret has led teams at companies ranging from startups to Fortune 500 firms including Amazon, Microsoft and HP. She grew up in Detroit and began her career in the automotive industry, an experience that helped her feel at home in the similarly male-dominated technology sector.

    She has a passion for mentoring women in technology and has made it her mission to share the lessons she has learned with others and to mentor them in their own journeys.

  • How do tools affect culture?

    Most of the DevOps community talks about how tools don’t matter much. The culture has to change first, the argument goes, which might modify how the tools are used.

    I agree and disagree with that concept. I believe the relationship between tools and culture is more symbiotic and bidirectional than unidirectional. I have discovered this through real-world transformations across several companies now. I admit it’s hard to determine whether the tools changed the culture or whether the culture changed how the tools were used.

  • GPU Accelerated SQL queries with PostgreSQL & PG-Strom in OpenShift-3.10

    In the OpenShift 3.9 GPU blog, we leveraged machine learning frameworks on OpenShift for image recognition. And in the How To Use GPUs with DevicePlugin in OpenShift 3.10 blog, we installed and configured an OpenShift cluster with GPU support. In this installment, we will create a more sophisticated workload on the cluster – accelerating databases using GPUs.

    One of the key parts of any machine learning algorithm is the data (often referred to as the data lake/warehouse, stored as structured, semi-structured or unstructured data).

    A major part of machine learning pipelines is the preparation, cleaning, and exploration of this data. Specifically removing NAs (missing values), transformations, normalization, subsetting, sorting, and a lot of plotting.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock returned -15.52% negative Quarterly performance
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) CEO & President James M Whitehurst Sold $6.3 million of Shares
  • Sigma Planning Corp Increases Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • PHPUnit 7.3

    RPM of PHPUnit version 7.3 are available in remi repository for Fedora ≥ 25 and for Enterprise Linux (CentOS, RHEL...).

  • Reducing the use of non-glibc allocators in Fedora

    Memory allocation for applications is a bit of a balancing act between various factors including CPU performance, memory efficiency, and how the memory is actually being allocated and deallocated by the application. Different programs may have diverse needs, but it is often the kind of workload that the application is expected to handle that determines which memory allocator performs best. That argues for a diversity of memory allocators (and allocation strategies) but, on the other hand, that complicates things for Linux distributions. As a result, Fedora is discussing ways to rein in the spread of allocators used by its packages.

  • Copr has a brand new API

    New Copr version is here and after several months of discussions and development, it finally brings a brand new API. In this article, we are going to see why it was needed, how it is better than previous API versions (i.e. why you should be happy about it) and try some code samples.

Games and Wine

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Extreme downhill freeriding game 'Descenders' updated with the Ring of Fire update

    The latest update to Descenders adds in the fifth environment to play through named Volcano, which gives you a different way to play. The interesting thing about the Volcano environment, is that you have to unlock it in a very specific way with the developer teasing that "it involves fiery rings of fire". Instead of stunts, this environment uses tectonics instead. In other words, you're in for a bumpy ride.

    In addition to the new environment, which is pretty darn tough to actually reach, they've also added in more new stuff. Along with now having a Linux version that works properly.

    In this update there's also another new bonus level for you to find, they've expanded the "Freeride" mode where you tweak the settings to build your own track to add in the special build crew feature, which gives you certain modifiers like smoother curves or reducing speed wobble. There's also new items for you to unlock as well.

  • It Looks Like A Steam 64-Bit Client Could Finally Be Near

    It looks like Valve could be prepping to finally ship a 64-bit Steam client, possibly coinciding with their long talked about Steam UI/UX overhaul.

    Valve today shipped a new beta release with just one listed change, "Added support for shipping different binaries to 64bit vs 32bit operating systems in Steam self-updater. This support is being added in preparation for future updates."

    The ability for the Steam update to ship different binaries depending upon architecture would be a prerequisite for being able to introduce a 64-bit Steam client while retaining the 32-bit client too... They don't explicitly say it's for shipping a 64-bit Steam client soon, but it's 2018 after all, and there wouldn't be much of a reason to otherwise be adding this capability to the Steam updater...

  • DXVK Introducing Per-Game Configuration Files

    While DXVK is capable of running a great deal of Direct3D 11 games via Vulkan within Wine, a number of games have required various workarounds for either getting the game to properly work in the first place or to run efficiently. Those per-game settings are now being punted off into a per-game configuration system.

  • VK9 - Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan - Completes 27th Milestone

    It's not nearly as far along as DXVK that is allowing D3D11-over-Vulkan and already running great numbers of games in a performant manner under Wine, but the VK9 project for implementing Direct3D 9 over Vulkan has now hit its twenty-seventh milestone.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Voting By Cell Phone Is A Terrible Idea, And West Virginia Is Probably The Last State That Should Try It Anyway

    So we've kind of been over this. For more than two decades now we've pointed out that electronic voting is neither private nor secure. We've also noted that despite this several-decade long conversation, many of the vendors pushing this solution are still astonishingly-bad at not only securing their products, but acknowledging that nearly every reputable security analyst and expert has warned that it's impossible to build a secure fully electronic voting system, and that if you're going to to do so anyway, at the very least you need to include a paper trail system that's not accessible via the internet.

  • Dell EMC Data Protection Advisor Versions 6.2 – 6.5 found Vulnerable to XML External Entity (XEE) Injection & DoS Crash

    An XML External Entity (XEE) injection vulnerability has been discovered in Dell’s EMC Data Protection Advisor’s version 6.4 through 6.5. This vulnerability is found in the REST API and it could allow an authenticated remote malicious attacker to compromise the affected systems by reading server files or causing a Denial of Service (DoS crash through maliciously crafted Document Type Definitions (DTDs) through the XML request.

  • DeepLocker: Here’s How AI Could ‘Help’ Malware To Attack Stealthily

    By this time, we have realized how artificial intelligence is a boon and a bane at the same time. Computers have become capable of performing things that human beings cannot. It is not tough to imagine a world where you AI could program human beings; thanks to sci-fi television series available lately.

  • DeepLocker: How AI Can Power a Stealthy New Breed of Malware

    Cybersecurity is an arms race, where attackers and defenders play a constantly evolving cat-and-mouse game. Every new era of computing has served attackers with new capabilities and vulnerabilities to execute their nefarious actions.

  • DevSecOps: 3 ways to bring developers, security together

    Applications are the heart of digital business, with code central to the infrastructure that powers it. In order to stay ahead of the digital curve, organizations must move fast and deploy code quickly, which unfortunately is often at odds with stability and security.

    With this in mind, where and how can security fit into the DevOps toolchain? And, in doing so, how can we create a path for successfully deterring threats?

  • Top 5 New Open Source Security Vulnerabilities in July 2018 [Ed: Here is Microsoft's partner WhiteSource attacking FOSS today by promoting the perception that "Open Source" = bugs]
  • DarkHydrus Relies on Open-Source Tools for Phishing Attacks [Ed: I never saw a headline blaming "proprietary tools" or "proprietary back door" for security problems, so surely this author is just eager to smear FOSS]
  • If for some reason you're still using TKIP crypto on your Wi-Fi, ditch it – Linux, Android world bug collides with it [Ed: Secret 'standards' of WPA* -- managed by a corporate consortium -- not secure, still...]

    It’s been a mildly rough week for Wi-Fi security: hard on the heels of a WPA2 weakness comes a programming cockup in the wpa_supplicant configuration tool used on Linux, Android, and other operating systems.

    The flaw can potentially be exploited by nearby eavesdroppers to recover a crucial cryptographic key exchanged between a vulnerable device and its wireless access point – and decrypt and snoop on data sent over the air without having to know the Wi-Fi password. wpa_supplicant is used by Linux distributions and Android, and a few others, to configure the Wi-Fi for computers, gadgets, and handhelds.

  • Linux vulnerability could lead to DDoS attacks

Graphics: Libinput, Mesa and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • How the 60-evdev.hwdb works

    libinput made a design decision early on to use physical reference points wherever possible. So your virtual buttons are X mm high/across, the pointer movement is calculated in mm, etc. Unfortunately this exposed us to a large range of devices that don't bother to provide that information or just give us the wrong information to begin with. Patching the kernel for every device is not feasible so in 2015 the 60-evdev.hwdb was born and it has seen steady updates since. Plenty a libinput bug was fixed by just correcting the device's axis ranges or resolution. To take the magic out of the 60-evdev.hwdb, here's a blog post for your perusal, appreciation or, failing that, shaking a fist at. Note that the below is caller-agnostic, it doesn't matter what userspace stack you use to process your input events.

  • Mesa 18.2-RC2 Released With 17 Fixes So Far

    One week after branching Mesa 18.2 and issuing the first release candidate, the second weekly RC is now available for testing.

    Mesa 18.2-RC2 has 17 patches queued, including several V3D (formerly "VC5") Broadcom driver fixes, build system updates, fixing the DRISW compilation for Android Nougat, and other small fixes.

  • Mesa 18.2.0-rc2

    The second release candidate for the Mesa 18.2.0 is now available.

  • AMDGPU LRU Bulk Move Functionality Increases Performance In OpenCL And Vulkan
  • AMD Releases 18.Q3 Linux Drivers for Radeon Pro, Including Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Support

    This update also brings Vulkan 1.1 support, and initial support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS – which is great news for those who recently upgraded to the latest Ubuntu 18.04 LTS package.

    The package is mainly intended for Vega Frontier, Radeon Pro, Radeon Pro WX, and FirePro S/W graphics cards, and the entire driver stack is derived from the 18.20 driver branch which includes both PRO and All-Open driver options.

ZX Spectrum Vega+ blows a FUSE: It runs open-source emulator

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets

The ZX Spectrum Vega+ is running open-source Spectrum emulator software FUSE, The Register has confirmed while carrying out a hands-on review of the handheld console.

As regular readers know, the Vega+ is the flagship product of Retro Computers Ltd, the company which took £513,000 in crowdfunded cash from members of the public to produce handheld ZX Spectrum-themed gaming consoles. It failed to deliver any for two years and then belatedly emitted what appear to be several dozen of the devices last week.

With public interest at an all-time high in what the company has actually produced during the ongoing scandal, El Reg acquired one from an RCL customer for review purposes.

No instructions were supplied with the console. In time-honoured retro gaming fashion, The Register’s crack review team resorted to button-mashing to figure out what did what.

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KDE GSoc and Akademy

Filed under
KDE

Linux Foundation and Kernel Development

Filed under
Linux
  • Containers Microconference Accepted into 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference

    The Containers Micro-conference at Linux Plumbers is the yearly gathering of container runtime developers, kernel developers and container users. It is the one opportunity to have everyone in the same room to both look back at the past year in the container space and discuss the year ahead.

    In the past, topics such as use of cgroups by containers, system call filtering and interception (Seccomp), improvements/additions of kernel namespaces, interaction with the Linux Security Modules (AppArmor, SELinux, SMACK), TPM based validation (IMA), mount propagation and mount API changes, uevent isolation, unprivileged filesystem mounts and more have been discussed in this micro-conference.

  • LF Deep Learning Foundation Advances Open Source Artificial Intelligence With Major Membership Growth

    The LF Deep Learning Foundation, an umbrella organization of The Linux Foundation that supports and sustains open source innovation in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning, today announced five new members: Ciena, DiDi, Intel, Orange and Red Hat. The support of these new members will provide additional resources to the community to develop and expand open source AI, ML and DL projects, such as the Acumos AI Project, the foundation's comprehensive platform for AI model discovery, development and sharing.

  • A quick history of early-boot memory allocators

    One might think that memory allocation during system startup should not be difficult: almost all of memory is free, there is no concurrency, and there are no background tasks that will compete for memory. Even so, boot-time memory management is a tricky task. Physical memory is not necessarily contiguous, its extents change from system to system, and the detection of those extents may be not trivial. With NUMA things are even more complex because, in order to satisfy allocation locality, the exact memory topology must be determined. To cope with this, sophisticated mechanisms for memory management are required even during the earliest stages of the boot process.

    One could ask: "so why not use the same allocator that Linux uses normally from the very beginning?" The problem is that the primary Linux page allocator is a complex beast and it, too, needs to allocate memory to initialize itself. Moreover, the page-allocator data structures should be allocated in a NUMA-aware way. So another solution is required to get to the point where the memory-management subsystem can become fully operational.

    In the early days, Linux didn't have an early memory allocator; in the 1.0 kernel, memory initialization was not as robust and versatile as it is today. Every subsystem initialization call, or simply any function called from start_kernel(), had access to the starting address of the single block of free memory via the global memory_start variable. If a function needed to allocate memory it just increased memory_start by the desired amount. By the time v2.0 was released, Linux was already ported to five more architectures, but boot-time memory management remained as simple as in v1.0, with the only difference being that the extents of the physical memory were detected by the architecture-specific code. It should be noted, though, that hardware in those days was much simpler and memory configurations could be detected more easily.

  • Teaching the OOM killer about control groups

    The kernel's out-of-memory (OOM) killer is summoned when the system runs short of free memory and is unable to proceed without killing one or more processes. As might be expected, the policy decisions around which processes should be targeted have engendered controversy for as long as the OOM killer has existed. The 4.19 development cycle is likely to include a new OOM-killer implementation that targets control groups rather than individual processes, but it turns out that there is significant disagreement over how the OOM killer and control groups should interact.

    To simplify a bit: when the OOM killer is invoked, it tries to pick the process whose demise will free the most memory while causing the least misery for users of the system. The heuristics used to make this selection have varied considerably over time — it was once remarked that each developer who changes the heuristics makes them work for their use case while ruining things for everybody else. In current kernels, the heuristics implemented in oom_badness() are relatively simple: sum up the amount of memory used by a process, then scale it by the process's oom_score_adj value. That value, found in the process's /proc directory, can be tweaked by system administrators to make specific processes more or less attractive as an OOM-killer target.

    No OOM-killer implementation is perfect, and this one is no exception. One problem is that it does not pay attention to how much memory a particular user has allocated; it only looks at specific processes. If user A has a single large process while user B has 100 smaller ones, the OOM killer will invariably target A's process, even if B is using far more memory overall. That behavior is tolerable on a single-user system, but it is less than optimal on a large system running containers on behalf of multiple users.

Debian: DebConf 18, nacho and Tomu

Filed under
Debian
  • DebConf 18 – Day 2

    Although I have already returned from this year’s DebConf, I try to continue to write up my comments on the talks I have attended. The first one was DebConf 18 – Day 1, here we go for Day 2.

  • Final GSOC 2018 Report

    This is the final report of my 2018 Google Summer of Code project. It also serves as my final code submission.

    ...]

    The main project was nacho, the web frontend for the guest accounts of the Debian project. The software is now in a state where it can be used in a production enviroment and there is already work being done to deploy the application on Debian infrastructure. It was a lot of fun programming that software and i learned a lot about Python and Django. My mentors gave me valuable feedback and pointed me in the right direction in case i had questions. There are still some ideas or features that can be implemented and i’m sure some feature requests will come up in the future. Those can be tracked in the issue tracker in the salsa repository. An overview of the activity in the project, including both commits and issues, can be seen in the activity list.

    The SSO evaluations i did give an overview of existing solutions and will help in the decision making process. The README in the evaluation repository has a table taht summarizes the findings of the evaluations.

  • I am Tomu!

    While I was away for DebConf18, I received the Tomu boards I ordered on Crowdsupply a while ago while the project was still going through crowdfunding.

Absolute Linux: Testing Snapshot/15.0 Based on Slackware Current

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Reviews
Slack

More Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Google Pixel 3 Complete Leak Reveals A Massive Notch And Full Specs
  • Android Pie: 5 features to check out first

    Google has just launched Android Pie, aka Android 9.0. As usual, the latest and greatest version of Android will only be on a short list of devices at first—Pixels, and a handful of Android One and Project Treble phones—but the release signals big things for Android. Here are the five new Android features you should check out first once your phone gets a piece of the pie.

  • Jeff Bailey Takes Over As Head Of Android Open Source Project
  • Google appoints Jeff Bailey as new head of AOSP

    Android P was officially given a version number and tasty nickname this week. To go along with the big announcement of Android 9 Pie, Google pushed the source code to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). That wasn’t the only new thing in AOSP this week. Google also named Jeff Bailey as the new lead for AOSP.

  • Android 9.0 Pie Officially Released, Rolling Out Now to Google Pixel Devices

    Google released today the final release of the Android 9.0 Linux-based mobile operating system for all supported Google Pixel devices, finally revealing the codename of the Android P release as Pie.

    Tailored for long-time and new Android users alike, the Android 9 Pie operating system release adapts to your needs every single day, learning your preferences and providing you with the best Android mobile experience possible. It comes with numerous new features and improvements that you can discover in the next paragraphs.

    "Android 9 adapts to you and how you use your phone, learning your preferences as you go. Your experience gets better and better over time, and it keeps things running smoother, longer," says Google. Android 9 harnesses the power of artificial intelligence to give you more. It’s smarter, faster and adjusts as you go for a better fit."

Chrome OS 68 for Chromebooks Brings Material 2.0 Design, PIN Sign-In Support

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Google today promoted the Chrome OS 68 Linux-based operating system for Chromebooks to the Stable channel as version 68.0.3440.87 (Platform version: 10718.71.2/3) for most devices, a release that brings numerous new features, improvements, and security updates.

Highlights of the Chrome OS 68 release include a brand-new Material 2.0 design for dialogs and secondary UI on Chrome OS, 802.11r fast BSS transition (FT) support for fast roaming, new Display Size settings for setting the size of a connected display, PIN sign-in support to allow users to use a PIN to sign into Chrome OS.

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OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Guest View: In praise of open source

    When you think of little social movements that bring about big societal shifts, the first thing that comes to mind probably isn’t open source. But maybe it should be.

    The technological revolution that is steadily digitizing every nook and cranny of human activity obviously relies on code, and open-source code underpins much of the recent surge in innovation. Streaming movies? Digital Assistants? Autonomous cars? All made possible to some degree by the open-source movement and the rapid evolution it has enabled. Access to open-source code lets us reversion, refine, enhance, and scale programs quickly and exponentially — it’s a font of collective knowledge that fuels a whirlwind of computational advancement.

  • OpenStack and Open Source MANO: Technologies for NFV Deployment

    We have experienced how open source software technologies revolutionized the application development process, which ultimately resulted in digital transformation across various industry verticals. Open source technologies now are disrupting the telecom sector for building 5G internet, which will be powered by network functions virtualization (NFV) and software defined networking (SDN). With NFV and SDN, multiple network functions and control and management operations in telecom networks will be software-driven; enabling the cloud-native and DevOps approach.

  • 5 golden rules for working openly with difficult people

    Sometimes these personalities can rub each other the wrong way, generate conflict, and be difficult to work with. Some of these people can be unclear in their expectations, overreact to relatively benign scenarios, and be unreliable. They can be your founders, executives, team-mates, other team members, or people who report to you. In many cases, people handle these challenging personalities in a sub-optimal way. They get distracted by the ego and emotion in the situation as opposed to focusing on clear, productive outcomes and building lasting trust.

  • Engaging young people: How to include positive youth participation in our free software community
  • OSCON's 20th anniversary and more

    The O'Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON) returned to Portland, Oregon this July for the 20th convocation of this venerable gathering. While some of the program focused on retrospectives, there were also talks and tutorials on multiple technical topics and open-source community management. To give you a feel for the whole conference, we will explore it in a two-part article. This installment will cover a retrospective of open source and some presentations on releasing projects as open source at your organization. A second article will include a few of the technical topics at the conference.

  • Open Source Visual Studio Code Extension Helps Create Alexa Skills [Ed: Microsoft propagandist (for at least a decade)  David Ramel does openwashing for Microsoft and surveillance in the listening device (bug) sense]
  • Guy Martin: Open Source Strategy at Autodesk [Ed: You know that Autodesk, a proprietary software giant, has paid some 'slush funds' to Zemlin's LF. Why else would Swapnil Bhartiya do an openwashing piece for them? Using the money they funnel to Zemlin?]

Programming: State of Rust Survey and Python Development

Filed under
Development
  • Launching the 2018 State of Rust Survey

    It’s that time again! Time for us to take a look at how the Rust project is doing, and what we should plan for the future. The Rust Community Team is pleased to announce our 2018 State of Rust Survey! Whether or not you use Rust today, we want to know your opinions. Your responses will help the project understand its strengths and weaknesses and establish development priorities for the future.

    Completing this survey should take about 10 to 15 minutes and is anonymous unless you choose to give us your contact information. We will be accepting submissions until September 8th, and we will write up our findings a month or so afterwards to blog.rust-lang.org. You can see last year’s results here.

  • Perform robust unit tests with PyHamcrest

    At the base of the testing pyramid are unit tests. Unit tests test one unit of code at a time—usually one function or method.

    Often, a single unit test is designed to test one particular flow through a function, or a specific branch choice. This enables easy mapping of a unit test that fails and the bug that made it fail.

    Ideally, unit tests use few or no external resources, isolating them and making them faster.

  • Adding None-aware operators to Python?

    A PEP that has been around for a while, without being either accepted or rejected, was reintroduced recently on the python-ideas mailing list. PEP 505 ("None-aware operators") would provide some syntactic sugar, in the form of new operators, to handle cases where variables might be the special None value. It is a feature that other languages support, but has generally raised concerns about being "un-Pythonic" over the years. At this point, though, the Python project still needs to figure out how it will be governed—and how PEPs can be accepted or rejected.

  • The Grumpy Editor's Python 3 experience

    LWN has been running articles for years to the effect that the end of Python 2 is nigh and that code should be ported to Python 3 immediately. So, naturally, one might expect that our own site code, written in Python, had been forward-ported long ago. Strangely enough, that didn't actually happen. It has mostly happened now, though. In the process of doing this work, your editor has noticed a few things that don't necessarily appear in the numerous porting guides circulating on the net.

    One often-heard excuse for delaying this work is that one or more dependencies have not yet been ported to Python 3. For almost everybody, that excuse ran out of steam some time ago; if a module has not been forward-ported by now, it probably never will be and other plans need to be made. In our case, the final dependency was the venerable Quixote web framework which, due to the much appreciated work of Neil Schemenauer, was forward-ported at the end of 2017. Quixote never really took the world by storm, but it makes the task of creating a code-backed site easy; we would have been sad to have to leave it behind.

    Much of the anxiety around moving to Python 3 is focused on how that language handles strings. The ability to work with Unicode was kind of bolted onto Python 2, but it was designed into Python 3 from the beginning. The result is a strict separation between the string type (str), which holds text as Unicode code points, and bytes, which contains arbitrary data — including text in a specific encoding. Python 2 made it easy to be lazy and ignore that distinction much of the time; Python 3 requires a constant awareness of which kind of data is being dealt with.

Reporting Metrics Back to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

After some time on Kubuntu on this new laptop, I just re-discovered that I did not want to live in the Plasma world anymore. While I do value all the work the team behind it does, the user interface is just not for me as it feels rather busy to my liking.

In that aforementioned post I wrote about running the Ubuntu Report Tool on this system, it is not part of the Kubuntu install or first boot experience but you can install it by running apt install ubuntu-report followed by running ubuntu-report to actually create the report and if you want, send it too.

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Getting started with Postfix, an open source mail transfer agent

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

Postfix is a great program that routes and delivers email to accounts that are external to the system. It is currently used by approximately 33% of internet mail servers. In this article, I'll explain how you can use Postfix to send mail using Gmail with two-factor authentication enabled.

Before you get Postfix up and running, however, you need to have some items lined up. Following are instructions on how to get it working on a number of distros.

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LibreOffice 6.1 "Fresh" Arrived with iconic changes! A Quick Look.

Filed under
News

A spotlight on fresh LibreOffice 6.1 which arrived recently.

LibreOffice 6.1 released with major changes that impacts day-to-day working of users. A highlights of the changes follows.

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More in Tux Machines

Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal. Read more

5 open source strategy and simulation games for Linux

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist. So, can someone who only uses free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely ever to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it. Read more

Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released
    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release. This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes. Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.
  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update
    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms. The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.
  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements
    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.
  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November
    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date. This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.
  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options
    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems. The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018. Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”
  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support
    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier. Read more