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About Tux Machines

Friday, 15 Oct 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux Users Have Had Enough...Here We Come

Filed under
Linux

WE push a product or pull it. Sure, they advertise like hell and try to sway us this way or that...but the ultimate choice lies with US...you and I. The ball is in our court.

Hackers aren't just picking on Microsoft - study

Filed under
Security

While hackers continued to poke new holes in Microsoft Corp.'s popular Windows operating system, they increasingly exploited flaws in software made by other companies as well, the nonprofit SANS Institute found.

n/a

Apple's Tiger vs. Windows XP 64-Bit Edition vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

With servers, where there is a good economic model, Linux would clearly remain favored over Apple because of much deeper support from companies like HP and IBM. But on the desktop, for most users, Tiger is the clear winner. It has better desktop application bundles, better customer support, better hardware, good value and is easier to use.

First Look at a Distro Changed: Mandriva LE 2005

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

If there is indeed a desktop Linux market, Mandrake Linux was one of the founding fathers, and up until their recent purchase of Conectiva Linux (and subsequent name change to Mandriva), they've reigned right along side other big-name contenders such as Novell/SUSE, Red Hat, Linspire, and Xandros... and you know what? They've done damn well, even surviving near extinction at one point when they filed "declaration de cessation des paiements" which is the French equivalent of Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the USA. How does the future of their desktop look? Stick around. We're about to find out.

Opera browser hasn't got its act all together

Filed under
Software

Opera's new Web browser responds to commands you speak into a microphone. It rearranges pages to fit narrower windows. It adds a security bar to help reduce the risk of fraud. But when it comes to the basics, too many Web sites simply don't work as well with Opera when compared with rival browsers from Microsoft Corp. and the Mozilla Foundation.

TUX Issue #2 Available

Filed under
Linux

Issue number two, May 2005, of TUX is now available.

This issue features:

*From the Publisher: Can Anyone Use Linux?
*From the Editor: Viva La Linux Desktop Revolucion
*The Light and Dark Side of Linux Multimedia
*Movies and More - Life with Xine

Ubuntu Linux backer tackles collaboration

Filed under
Linux

The company behind Ubuntu Linux is set to unveil ambitious plans to improve collaboration among the Linux community.

Scientists: Life on Mars Likely

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Not so long ago it was unthinkable for respectable scientists to talk about life on Mars, but now evidence is mounting to suggest biological processes and even life might be operating on the red planet.

Surprising 'Galaxy' hitchhikes to No. 1

Filed under
Movies

This weekend was to be the start of the summer movie season. But audiences must have been spring cleaning. Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy topped box office charts and pushed the XXX sequel to No. 3.

Latest Secunia Security Advisories

Filed under
Security
  • Mandriva updates for perl, xpm, and squid

  • Gentoo updates for pound and horde

  • Gentoo phpmyadmin Installation Script Insecure Permissions

Lenovo completes acquisition of IBM

Filed under
Hardware

China's Lenovo Group has completed its $1.75 billion purchase of IBM PC division, creating the world's third-largest PC maker, the companies said Sunday.

Inaction Could Lead to Cybersecurity Law

Filed under
Web
Legal

U.S. businesses for years have urged the government to let them set computer-security standards of their own, but their inability to do so could now prompt Congress to step in, experts say.

Playing catch on tiny scale

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The neutrino, a seemingly magical, highly elusive particle, may hold clues to the Big Bang. A $55 million particle physics experiment in the abandoned Soudan mines of Duluth, Minn. is part of a worldwide effort to unravel it's secrets.

Inmates find ways to go online

Filed under
Web

Keith Maydak's jail cells are roomier than most. Must be all that cyberspace. Thousands of inmates access the Internet indirectly using inmate telephone and mail privileges and a network of family, friends or activists. Once on the Web, they enlist celebrities like Susan Sarandon to plead their case, pillory the prosecutors who imprisoned them, or simply find pen pals.

Ad Rev Surpasses Dotcom Boom Levels

Filed under
Web

U.S. Internet advertising surged 33 percent in 2004 to a record $9.6 billion, surpassing levels seen during the early Web boom, and will grow at a similar rate in 2005, according to data released on Thursday.

Online gaming costs set to rise

Filed under
Gaming

Downloadable content is becoming an established part of online console gaming, but what will gamers see in the next round of consoles?

The top semiconductor companies

Filed under
Hardware

Every year at this time, ELECTRONIC BUSINESS publishes a list of the top semiconductor companies. It's an indication of the maturity of the electronics industry that most companies in the top 20 positions or so place at or around the same position they held the preceding year. But over the last five years, from boom to bust to now, there has been some intriguing shuffling.

Review: Mac Os X steps ahead of Windows

Filed under
Mac
Reviews

Tired of waiting while your PC slowly scours its hard drive for a document you stashed somewhere six months ago? Sick of having to change how you work to conform with the computer's rigid way of organizing files? Bored with the flat look of the desktop's graphics?

wanna try linux but dont know how?

Filed under
Linux

Another one a couple days old, but hey, it's a slow news day.

"Tired of not able to know how to install Linux
Tired of getting called nOOb by so called experts
Tired of just downloading Linux but not able to install it.

Well.......

you have some place to look now and get help without being called noob or any other name."

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Sourcing a file in Linux: Here are the basics of this important concept - TechRepublic

    Open source expert Jack Wallen explains the Linux source command and offers an example.

  • How to play Legion TD 2 on Linux

    Legion TD 2 is a tower defense game for Windows. It was developed and published by AutoAttack Games. Thanks to Proton, you’ll be able to play this game on Linux. Here’s how.

  • How to play Stick Fight: The Game on Linux

    Stick Fight: The Game is a physics-based online fighting game for PC. It was developed by Landfall West and published by Landfall. Here’s how you can enjoy Stick Fight: The Game on Linux.

  • Setting up a ThinkPad x250 with Linux

    Two chapters in this article are Debian-specific, the rest is more or less Archlinux-specific. It never grew into the device-specific alround tutorial I envisioned and has been partially superseded by this article. The ThinkPad itself is in daily use. No regrets there!

  • How to Install Fish Shell on CentOS 8 and Rocky Linux 8 – VITUX

    Fish Shell also known as ‘Friendly interactive shell’ used for Unix/Linux-like operating distributions. It provides a smart, fully equipped, and user-friendly command-line environment for all Linux users. Fish shell supports various features unlike any other shell such as autosuggestion, Tab completion, syntax highlighting, Sane Scripting, Glorious VGA Color, and web-based configuration. Using this interactive shell environment, you do not need to remember a bunch of Linux commands because it is more productive and comes with various handy features. We will talk about the installation of interactive Fish Shell on CentOS 8 in this tutorial. The same steps apply to Rocky Linux and AlmaLinux too.

  • How to disable Special keys Windows 10 (Sticky keys) | ITIGIC - TechStony

    They are keys that exist since the first versions of Windows and continue in the most recent versions, including Windows 10. Therefore, we are going to tell you what the special keys or Sticky Keys consist of and how to deactivate them because you have already tired of having them in your computer (or because they hinder you).

  • How to install Devuan(II) - Unixcop

    In this article I show how to install Devuan using the installer included in the desktop-live iso, refractainstaller. In a previous article I’ve showed how to install it using the net-install ISO. From the devuan site: Devuan GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd that allows users to reclaim control over their system by avoiding unnecessary entanglements and ensuring Init Freedom.

  • How to install and configure NextCloud on Centos 8 and LEMP

    In this guide, we are going to set up NextCloud on a Centos 8 server hosted with Nginx and php (LEMP stack). We will be using Mysql 8 and PHP 7.4 for this guide.This will also work for RHEL derivatives like Alma Linux 8, Rocky Linux 8 and RHEL 8. Nextcloud is an Open Source suite of client-server software for creating and using file hosting services. It is a a free self-hosted cloud storage solution similar to Dropbox, Google Drive, etc. With Nextcloud, you don’t have to worry about the pricey alternatives and since you will host your own files, you don’t have to worry about privacy or someone collecting your data.

Kernel: Paul E. Mc Kenney and New Stuff in Linux

  • Paul E. Mc Kenney: TL;DR: Memory-Model Recommendations for Rusting the Linux Kernel

    These recommendations assume that the initial Linux-kernel targets for Rust developers are device drivers that do not have unusual performance and scalability requirements, meaning that wrappering of small C-language functions is tolerable. (Please note that most device drivers fit into this category.) It also assumes that the main goal is to reduce memory-safety bugs, although other bugs might be addressed as well. Or, Murphy being Murphy, created as well. But that is a risk in all software development, not just Rust in the Linux kernel. Those interested in getting Rust into Linux-kernel device drivers sooner rather than later should look at the short-term recommendations, while those interested in extending Rust's (and, for that matter, C's) concurrency capabilities might be more interested in the long-term recommendations.

  • Verification Challenges

    You would like to do some formal verification of C code? Or you would like a challenge for your formal-verification tool? Either way, here you go!

  • Cluster Scheduler Support Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    Cluster scheduler support has been queued up for landing in the Linux 5.16 kernel for AArch64 and x86_64 systems for improving the CPU scheduler behavior for systems that have clusters of CPU cores. The cluster scheduler support in this context is about enhancing the Linux kernel's scheduler for systems where sets of CPU cores share an L2 cache or other mid-level caches/resources. This cluster scheduler work stems from work by HiSilicon and Huawei aiming to improve the Linux performance for the Kunpeng 920 server chip. That HiSilicon SoC has six or eight clusters per NUMA node with four CPU cores per cluster and a shared L3 cache. With the cluster scheduler patches they were able to enhance the overall performance of the system and also improve the efficiency.

  • AMD Finally Enabling PSR By Default For Newer Hardware With Linux 5.16 - Phoronix

    With it getting late into the Linux 5.15 kernel cycle, the focus is shifting by the Direct Rendering Driver maintainers from new feature work targeting the next cycle (5.16) to instead on bug fixes. AMD sent out a pull request of new AMDGPU Linux 5.16 material this week that is primarily delivering bug fixes but one notable addition is finally enabling PSR by default for newer GPUs.

  • Intel Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 Ships Updated DG1 Support - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source engineers have shipped Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 as the newest version of this Linux compute stack enabling OpenCL and Level Zero support with their graphics processors. Intel Compute-Runtime 21.41.21220 is the latest weekly update for this compute stack. New this week is updated DG1 platform support and Level Zero support for SPIR-V static module linking.

OpenSSH, Squid, PostgreSQL Update in Tumbleweed

Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released this week have brought updates for text editors, browsers, emails clients, database management systems and many other pieces of software. Mozilla Firefox, Thunderbird, nano, and PostgreSQL were all in the latest 20211012 snapshot. A new major version of Firefox 93.0 added support for the optimised image format AVIF, which offers a significant file size reduction as opposed to other image formats. The browser also improved web compatibility for privacy protections and fixed more than a handful of Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures. Thunderbird 91.2.0 addressed many of the same CVEs, fixed some issues with the calendar and fixed the new mail notifications that did not properly take subfolders into account. The 5.9 version of text editor nano added syntax highlighting for YAML files and fetchmail 6.4.22 added a few patches, addressed a CVE related to an IMAP connections and now highlights being compatible with OpenSSL 1.1.1 and 3.0.0. The new major version of postgresql 14 provided improvements for heavy workloads, enhanced distributed workloads and added a couple more predefined roles like pg_read_all_data, pg_write_all_data and pg_database_owner. Other packages to update in the snapshot were GNOME’s document viewer evince 41.2, Flatpak 1.12.1, graphics library gegl 0.4.32, glusterfs 9.3 and many RubyGems and YaST package updates. Read more Also: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the weeks 2021/40 & 41

Games: Dystopian Army Builder, Hellraid DLC, and More

  • Uh oh, looks like Despot's Game: Dystopian Army Builder is going to suck all my time away | GamingOnLinux

    Despot's Game: Dystopian Army Builder is a brand new release from Konfa Games and tinybuild that sees you command a bunch of naked people and send them through a strange post-apocalyptic labyrinth. Note: personal purchase. Like it Loop Hero, you have no direct control during combat you just watch it play out and hope for the best. Here though you're running through some kind of maze-like dungeon full of strange machines, with multiple people you need to look after. They'll likely die a lot though, don't get too attached, you can buy more naked people. Eventually you might come across the nefarious d’Spot who runs the show and perhaps destroy them to earn your freedom. It blends together quite a few different genres and it feels totally unique. The structure is a bit like The Binding of Isaac with you going from room to room, it's also a strategy game with you buying people and equipping them with various weapons you buy from shops spread throughout the maze and then there's the fusion of auto battling so you can sit back and watch the mess unfold.

  • Techland continue expanding the Hellraid DLC as they try to improve reviews | GamingOnLinux

    When Techland released the Hellraid DLC in August 2020 inspired by their unreleased dark fantasy slasher Hellraid the reviews were not kind, as it was very basic but they've kept at it and another big update is out now.

  • Brawlhalla to get Easy Anti-Cheat, dev puts up Beta with EAC working on Linux with Proton | GamingOnLinux

    Blue Mammoth Games announced that later in October that the platform-fighter Brawlhalla will be getting Easy Anti-Cheat. Thankfully, they've put up a Beta for Linux users playing it on Steam Play Proton and it works.

  • Apple is now funding Blender development joining many big names | GamingOnLinux

    There's apparently absolutely no stopping the Blender train, with the developer announcing that Apple has now joined their development fund.

  • Valve banning games that allow exchanging cryptocurrencies or NFTs | GamingOnLinux

    It seems Valve aren't a big fan of cryptocurrencies or NFTs as they've updated their onboarding guide with a new point about disallowing games that allow you to exchange them. Under the Rules and Guidelines heading where it mentions "What you shouldn’t publish on Steam" there's a new line that states "Applications built on blockchain technology that issue or allow exchange of cryptocurrencies or NFTs".

  • Check out this crowdfunding campaign to learn Godot Engine from GDQuest | GamingOnLinux

    GDQuest, a well-known name in the free and open source Godot Engine land has launched a new crowdfunding campaign aiming to get you to go from zero to hero with Godot programming. A course aimed at anyone and everyone who fancies getting into making games with Godot. The founder of GDQuest, Nathan Lovato, emailed in a little info about it: " Learn to Code From Zero is a course for everyone who wants to learn development. With it, you will learn programming from the very basics to creating a complete video game inspired by the hectic action game Enter the Gungeon. Game development courses typically consist of hours of step-by-step tutorials. They feel nice while you follow along, but as soon as you're left alone, working on your game, you get stuck.