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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 27 Nov 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Phoronix on Linux 4.4., Graphics Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 2:22pm
Story Leftovers: Servers Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 2:19pm
Story Torvalds and Kernel Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:59pm
Story Fedora 23: In The Ocean Again Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:45pm
Story Linux 4.4 Features Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:32pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:29pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:19pm
Story Mom & Me Grows Its Business With SUSE Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 1:13pm
Story October Plasma on Wayland Update: all about geometry Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 12:51pm
Story pfSense 2.2.5-RELEASE Now Available! Roy Schestowitz 07/11/2015 - 12:44pm

Experiences of a Linux Newbie

Filed under
Linux

This post recounts the experiences of a newbie's first install and use of a Linux distribution. It seem aimed at the windows user, but a nice heart-warming little read. I think he hits on a good point, one which I tried to make to a co-worker just tonight, Linux isn't just commandline anymore.

Hey Coool, a Virtual Tour

Filed under
Web

The Detroit News is carrying all the news of the entries in this year's Detroit Auto Show. In fact they even have virtual tour. Shooo, saves me a trip to Michigan! Tongue

Typing Style Can Be Password

Filed under
Security

"The way you type is as unique as your eye color or speech patterns and can be used instead of a password to protect your computer, researchers at Louisiana Tech and Penn State say."

New Robots More Humanlike

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"Scientists have developed three new robots that walk a lot like humans do. The androids, unveiled yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., are extremely efficient, using about the same amount of energy as a person out for a stroll does."

Brightest Galactic Flash Ever Detected Hits Earth

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"A huge explosion halfway across the galaxy packed so much power it briefly altered Earth's upper atmosphere, astronomers said Friday. No known eruption beyond our solar system has ever appeared as bright upon arrival."

Legislation to regulate games

Filed under
Gaming

Gamespot is running a story reporting that proposed legislation would make it illegal for retailers in the state to sell or rent violent games to children under 17. Initially that sounds like it might be a good idea, but I can't help but to cringe each time another area of life becomes over-regulated.

Tex Says It's Ready

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

Texstar's PCLinuxOS pre-8.1 is going to the mirrors soon. He is quoted as saying...

Latest On the Browser Wars

Filed under
Web

Charles Cooper at news.com shares some of his experiences at the RSA Conference and thoughts on the IE - Firefox war. He says, "So there I was trying my best to get a midlevel Microsoft manager to take the bait. 'Does Microsoft now feel confident it's found a way to slow the rise of Firefox--maybe even win back some lost customers?' Instead I was left high and dry."

IBM Pledges $100 Million for Linux

Filed under
Linux

IBM announced today that it will spend $100 million over the next several years developing linux applications for it's enterprize desktop offerings. vnunet is quoted as saying, "According to Big Blue, its expanded Linux support will help customers build Linux-based enterprise infrastructures. It aims to enable products and applications to run on a variety of operating systems, including Linux."

This Week at the Movies: Hitch & The Aviator

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

Martin Scorsese's The Aviator turned out to be an insightful look into passions and madness of millionaire and self-proclaimed aviator Howard Hughes. The movie starts...

Is PCLOS 8.1 Close?

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

A little birdie told me that PCLinuxOS pre-8.1 might be getting real close to being released.

Do You Have an Xbox?

Filed under
Microsoft

If you own a M$ Xbox you may want to read this article from the Chicago Tribune summarizing a power cord failure that could cause injury and even fire. This article includes a phone number to get your replacement cord. I'm more glad than ever we use a Playstation2. Big Grin

A Week with KDE 3.4beta2

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
-s


Amidst all the interest in kde's 3.4beta2, introductions and screenshots were popping up all over the net, including my own. The latest from osnews is giving a quick overview of some of the newer features and their preliminary experiences. However after running the beta for about a week I must say

Security Showdown: Back & Forth

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Battles continue today in the M$ security war. Yesterday news began circulating that M$ Windows2003 server was found to be more secure than Redhat Enterprise. I'm skeptical until details of the study are released, as apparently they used the criteria of

Interview with Bill Gates

Filed under
Microsoft

abcnews has a transcript of the Peter Jennings interview with Sat^H^HBill Gates. I'd like to throw in some clever jabs and sarcastic remarks, but truth is I couldn't make it past the "Security is,

Study Find Open Source More Secure

Filed under
OSS

Well, duh? ACM Queue has published a summary of a study on open source vs. proprietary software. The study finds that the open source projects are advantageous due to "the existence of a large pool of testers and developers facilitates debugging and the true peer review of the code results in better code." On the down side

Whoops: KDE fliccd Buffer Overflow Vulnerabilities

Filed under
KDE
Security

"Erik Sjölund has reported some vulnerabilities in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to gain escalated privileges and potentially by malicious people to compromise a vulnerable system."

M$ Plans more Secure Browser :roll:

Filed under
Microsoft

This story has been all over the internet, and one can't seem to click a newsite anywhere without seeing it. Seems microsoft has changed it's mind in it's previous announcement of not offering an upgrade/update to it's browser until the release of it's new Windows version in last 2006 or 2007.

The Myth of Linux Security

Filed under
Linux

Tony Lock has written an article quoting Nick McGrath's allegations that Linux security is a myth. McGrath states that the lack of viruses for Linux is also a myth. Lock agrees that there has been malicious code released against Linux lately, but doesn't cite his source or give examples. In the end Lock writes, "Security and Linux may be a myth, but no more so than for any other operating system" but then concludes

Review of PCLOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

guiLINUX is running a review of the much admired and trusted PCLinuxOS complete with beautiful screenshots detailing how easy the harddrive installation and complete the default install is. Gabbman concludes, "My hope is that I have inspired someone to have the freedom of choice to find a Desktop that works for them in a easy to use manor as it does for me. That is the power of Linux, the freedom to choose."

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: RenderDoc, Mesa, and Vulkan

  • RenderDoc 1.17 Released For This Leading Open-Source Graphics Debugging Tool - Phoronix

    RenderDoc 1.17 released this week as the newest version of this leading cross-platform, cross-API graphics debugging utility. RendertDoc 1.17 continues to be a gem for developers working with Vulkan and OpenGL along with Direct3D 11/12. RenderDoc as the MIT-licensed frame-capture-based graphics debugger works extremely well for game/engine developers as well as GPU driver developers in working through different issues.

  • DMA-BUF Feedback Support For Wayland Lands In Mesa 22.0's EGL Code - Phoronix

    Landing in Mesa on Black Friday was DMA-BUF Feedback support within the EGL code as another important step forward for Wayland. Introduced earlier this week was Wayland Protocols 1.24 and the primary addition to that collection of protocols is DMA-BUF feedback support. The DMA-BUF "feedback" support is important for Wayland multi-GPU systems where needing to know more information about the GPU device used by the compositor and for being able to efficiently exchange buffers between the secondary and primary GPUs.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Finally Adds VK_KHR_synchronization2 Support - Phoronix

    The Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has added support for the prominent VK_KHR_synchronization2 extension introduced earlier this year. Added back in February with Vulkan 1.2.170 was VK_KHR_synchronization2 for simplifying the core synchronization APIs of this industry-standard graphics API. VK_KHR_synchronization2 makes Vulkan synchronization handling easier to deal with Those interested in the changes with the "synchronization2" revision can see this Khronos blog post going over the Vulkan synchronization handling in detail along with the changes from this extension.

Kernel: Futex2, Fixes, and Other New Features for Linux 5.16

  • Futex2 Brings Linux Gaming To The Next Level - Invidious

    Futex2 has been a work in progress by Valve and collabora for a very long time and it seems like it's finally going to make it's way into the kernel.

  • Patch out for Alder Lake Linux bug that reminds of the Windows 11 Ryzen CPPC issue - Neowin

    Linux boss Linus Torvalds merged earlier today several important patches for Intel CPU generally related to performance states (P-states) on Linux.

  • Linux 5.16 Merges Fix For One Of The Intel Alder Lake Issues - Phoronix

    Merged this Friday afternoon into the Linux 5.16 development kernel is fixing a performance issue affecting some Intel Alder Lake motherboards. The fix merged a short time ago is the item previously covered within Linux ITMT Patch Fixes Intel "Alder Lake" Hybrid Handling For Some Systems. As explained in that prior article, TurboBoost Max 3.0 / ITMT (Turbo Boost Max Technology) code within the kernel isn't being enabled for some systems, particularly if overclocking or even any memory XMP / optimal settings. The ASUS Z690 board I've been primarily using for the i9-12900K was affected as are numerous other boards. I've also heard reports of some motherboards running purely stock are even having this issue.

  • Intel Preparing USI Stylus Support For Linux - Phoronix

    Intel open-source driver engineers have been working on USI stylus support for the Linux kernel. The Universal Stylus Initiative (USI) aims to offer interoperability of active styluses across touchscreen devices. The Universal Stylus Initiative has a goal of allowing all styluses that comply with USI to work across devices. USI is backed by the likes of Google who wants to see USI working uniformally across Chromebooks, Dell and other hardware vendors, Intel is also involved and leading the upstream Linux support patches, and peripheral vendors like Logitech are also supporting the standard. Other big names like Wacom, Samsung, and many other players from desktop to laptops to mobile.

Open Hardware/Modding With LineageOS and Arduino

  • Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant | Hackaday

    Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

  • My phone - November 2021

    My current phone is the Google Pixel 3a from 2019. It’s running the LineageOS operating system without the Open GApps stack (GApps is short for “Google Apps”). This means there’s no proprietary software or tracking from Google on the phone by default.

  • PiGlass V2 Embraces The New Raspberry Pi Zero 2 | Hackaday

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long. It’s been just about a month since the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 hit the market, and we’re already seeing folks revisit old projects to reap the benefits of the drop-in upgrade that provides five times the computational power in the same form factor. Take for example the PiGlass v2 that [Matt] has been working on. He originally put the Pi Zero wearable together back in 2018, and while it featured plenty of bells and whistles like a VuFine+ display, 5 MP camera, and bone conduction audio, the rather anemic hardware of the original Zero kept it from reaching its true potential.

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more